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Special Interest => Gulching/Self-Sufficiency => Food, Cooking, Brewing, Vinting, Distilling => Topic started by: crepemyrtle357 on March 09, 2009, 11:24:52 am

Title: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on March 09, 2009, 11:24:52 am
Hope no one minds, but thought a new gardening thread was needed. If anyone does mind just merge with one of the others.

I have a question. Can't remember who, but one of us, not me, planted garlic in the spring or summer of last year. Wanted to know how it did. I had bulbs for late fall planting but unfortunately didn't get it in.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: NuclearDruid on March 09, 2009, 11:38:42 am
Mutti and I planted a bed of garlic in the Fall. They're peeking their little leaves through the mulch now.

ND
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: fred.greek on March 09, 2009, 08:26:20 pm
My gardening research notes are online at:

http://sca21.wikia.com/wiki/Mess

Suggested sample list of books:

Gardening for Maximum Nutrition, Jerry Minnich
The Postage Stamp Garden Book, Duane Newcomb
How to Grow more Vegetables Than You Ever Thought Possible on Less Land Than You Can Imagine, John Jeavons
Carrots Love Tomatoes, Louise Riotte
One Circle, How to Grow a Complete Diet in Less than 1,000 Square Feet, David Duhon
Secrets to Great Soil, Elizabeth P. Stell
Future Fertility, Transforming Human Waste Into Human Wealth, John Beeby
Test Your Soil With Plants, John Beeby
The Humanure Handbook:  A Guide to Composting Human Manure, by Joseph Jenkins

Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Mr. Dare on March 09, 2009, 08:44:46 pm
We planted a dozen garlic bulbs back in November. They are all up and running now. No idea about planting later in the year, but they might not get finished if planted too late. The sooner the better I'm guessing.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: padre29 on March 09, 2009, 09:31:12 pm


Last year's small bucket garden showed me that there is simply not enough space available to grow foodstuffs in sufficient quantity to make it pay off.

So this year my garden shall be herbs like Basil and Thyme and jalapenos and maybe a nice high yielding tomato plant or three.

Field onions work well as well, and they are great in scrambled eggs.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: kirgi07 on March 10, 2009, 05:54:51 am


Last year's small bucket garden showed me that there is simply not enough space available to grow foodstuffs in sufficient quantity to make it pay off.

So this year my garden shall be herbs like Basil and Thyme and jalapenos and maybe a nice high yielding tomato plant or three.

Field onions work well as well, and they are great in scrambled eggs.

They are called ramps. Ought 7.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on March 10, 2009, 10:34:45 am
Quote
So this year my garden shall be herbs like Basil and Thyme and jalapenos and maybe a nice high yielding tomato plant or three.

When you plant your Thyme put it in its own container, it will come back the next year.  Minr id planted in a defunct wringer washer.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Texasbound on March 19, 2009, 09:29:26 pm
One thing I always have had is an area that I grow mint.  It's like a weed, hard to kill and spreads like wildfire.  We use it to make tea and for cooking all the time.   Can't seem to have enough of it.  You can grow it darn near anywhere is seems.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Who...me? on March 19, 2009, 09:42:49 pm


Last year's small bucket garden showed me that there is simply not enough space available to grow foodstuffs in sufficient quantity to make it pay off.

So this year my garden shall be herbs like Basil and Thyme and jalapenos and maybe a nice high yielding tomato plant or three.

Field onions work well as well, and they are great in scrambled eggs.

If you build an "A" frame rack you can put many more plants in a smaller area. I had one years ago and just built a new one this year. My mother in law asked if she could put a "few" plants in our garden last year and darned near took over. So this year I doubled the garden area and a new "A" frame so I would have the space I need and make her happy also. Because allowing her to take up so much garden made my wife happy. And as all me know....If momma ain't happy...ain't nobody  happy...LOL

Quote
It's like a weed, hard to kill and spreads like wildfire.

TB I know just what you mean. When we bought this house the fence line had mint growing down it's length. I wanted to put in raspberry plants instead. It took me 4 years to get rid of the mint plants.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Canadian Mamma on March 19, 2009, 09:58:47 pm
One thing I always have had is an area that I grow mint.  It's like a weed, hard to kill and spreads like wildfire.  We use it to make tea and for cooking all the time.   Can't seem to have enough of it.  You can grow it darn near anywhere is seems.


Sadly I've manged to kill it, I planted it a bed sort of under a tree.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: padre29 on March 19, 2009, 10:18:18 pm


Last year's small bucket garden showed me that there is simply not enough space available to grow foodstuffs in sufficient quantity to make it pay off.

So this year my garden shall be herbs like Basil and Thyme and jalapenos and maybe a nice high yielding tomato plant or three.

Field onions work well as well, and they are great in scrambled eggs.

If you build an "A" frame rack you can put many more plants in a smaller area. I had one years ago and just built a new one this year. My mother in law asked if she could put a "few" plants in our garden last year and darned near took over. So this year I doubled the garden area and a new "A" frame so I would have the space I need and make her happy also. Because allowing her to take up so much garden made my wife happy. And as all me know....If momma ain't happy...nobody is happy...LOL


Space is a bit too limited to do that, but that does have me thinking a bit.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Texasbound on March 20, 2009, 07:58:52 am
Does anyone have a solution to keeping local cats out of your garden, other than a .22??
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on March 20, 2009, 08:22:32 am
Moved Strawberries (about 300) to permanent bed, Artichokes (both globe and Jerusalem) are returning, Cardoon (for cheesemaking) as well,  ND started tomatoes, DD set up sweet potato slips, ND sorted through for seed potatoes, uncovered perennial herbs/greens (pro sorrel made it fine not sure on other variety), asparagus beds cleaned/filled/mulched, pear trees grafted or moved to permanent location - spring is coming!
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Who...me? on March 20, 2009, 10:56:54 am
Does anyone have a solution to keeping local cats out of your garden, other than a .22??

My cousin got one of these http://www.critterridders.com/scarecrow.htm ans swears by it. Good for any animal and it's also funny as all get out when used as a joke to surprise the kids.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Texasbound on March 20, 2009, 12:53:00 pm
Does anyone have a solution to keeping local cats out of your garden, other than a .22??

My cousin got one of these http://www.critterridders.com/scarecrow.htm ans swears by it. Good for any animal and it's also funny as all get out when used as a joke to surprise the kids.

Not a bad idea.... I hate it when they crap in the garden....
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Hollywoodgold on March 20, 2009, 10:07:12 pm
My gardening research notes are online at:

http://sca21.wikia.com/wiki/Mess

Suggested sample list of books:

Gardening for Maximum Nutrition, Jerry Minnich
The Postage Stamp Garden Book, Duane Newcomb
How to Grow more Vegetables Than You Ever Thought Possible on Less Land Than You Can Imagine, John Jeavons
Carrots Love Tomatoes, Louise Riotte
One Circle, How to Grow a Complete Diet in Less than 1,000 Square Feet, David Duhon
Secrets to Great Soil, Elizabeth P. Stell
Future Fertility, Transforming Human Waste Into Human Wealth, John Beeby
Test Your Soil With Plants, John Beeby
The Humanure Handbook:  A Guide to Composting Human Manure, by Joseph Jenkins



Fred:

Thanks for the list. I am thinking we should have a "Lists" thread from which to build great resources.

DS


Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Hollywoodgold on March 20, 2009, 10:11:37 pm
A cheap and simple soils additive is coffee grounds. The local Starbucks abounds with this additive.

I decided to buy fruit trees today. Bought 2 pears, 2 plums, 2 apples and 2 figs. Unlike vegetables, they take a couple of years to generate significant fruit. A long term investment.

DS
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on March 20, 2009, 10:16:35 pm
Quote
Thanks for the list. I am thinking we should have a "Lists" thread from which to build great resources

Use the wolfekipedia.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Hollywoodgold on March 20, 2009, 10:25:57 pm
Quote
Thanks for the list. I am thinking we should have a "Lists" thread from which to build great resources

Use the wolfekipedia.

Crepe:

I have but with little value resulting. Have a link??

Thanks
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on March 22, 2009, 10:37:00 pm
Friend I know who has a "garden type" commercial operation has passed this on:

1. Wholesale seed sales of fresh greens seed has dropped 20-25% due to concerns over liability (i.e. consumers who depend on box stores for fresh greens might be short later in the summer)

2. Demand for "plants" up about 45%.

Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Lisa Aenne on March 24, 2009, 01:25:41 am
Mutti, what is the potential liability with seeds for greens? 

I did some weeding yesterday and noticed that the little oregano plants I transplanted last year are starting to grow and spread.  Yum!  I need to begin work on a terracing project I have planned and I need to move some strawberry plants.

Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on March 24, 2009, 08:12:09 pm
Mutti, what is the potential liability with seeds for greens? 

I did some weeding yesterday and noticed that the little oregano plants I transplanted last year are starting to grow and spread.  Yum!  I need to begin work on a terracing project I have planned and I need to move some strawberry plants.

According to Paul, many growers will be avoiding the "fresh greens" due to the spinach/mixed greens scare last year.So they are ordering less see to grow the greens. From my understanding liability insurance prices are inhibiting the "smaller farmers" from providing this product due to cost constraints. But - I don't grow for sale so I don't follow it closely. Thankfully I have his "heads up" JIC. mutti

Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: NuclearDruid on March 26, 2009, 09:39:20 am
1 in 7 Americans plan to have a garden this year, up from 1 in 8 last year.

Survey: Big increase in US food gardening for 2009 (http://www.greenrightnow.com/kabc/2009/02/26/survey-big-increase-in-us-food-gardening-for-2009/)

Quote
The National Gardening Association’s new survey, “The Impact of Home and Community Gardening in America,” finds a 19 percent increase from 2008 in the number of Americans planning to grow their own food.

In addition to cost savings, the survey found that Americans are looking for better taste and safer foods.

ND
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Lisa Aenne on March 26, 2009, 10:59:53 am
Thank you for the information, Mutti.  I've not had much success at growing greens.  I don't know if I wait too long, or don't pull enough out when thinning, but they are usually scrawny.  All the more incentive to try again for better success this year; it sounds like availability will definitely be compromised this summer.  We eat a lot of veggies, especially greens.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on April 01, 2009, 02:24:29 pm
Well, I did it again... My tomato plants are already a foot tall and it will be weeks before they can be planted outside. sigh

I did borrow some "wall o water" thingies from a neighbor who isn't going to have a garden this year. They are used, so no instructions come with them, naturally. Does anyone have experience with these things? She described how to set them up, but I think I need to be an octopus first... or recruit at least three other people to help with it. Also, she indicated they are fairly fragile and she didn't have any "repair kits." Can they be repaired like a plastic swimming pool or ???

How much earlier can tomatoes be put out with these things? She wasn't clear on that either.

Any ideas gratefully received.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on April 03, 2009, 01:48:14 pm
Quote
Well, I did it again... My tomato plants are already a foot tall and it will be weeks before they can be planted outside. sigh

I've been fighting the urge to start my tomatoes yet. I think will wait til around April 15th. Suppose to snow sometime soon.

I planted some lettuce seed in a long planter, can't remember if they are real old or not lost label off the jar. But pretty sure some will germinate. But lettuce can take the snow just not hard freezes.

Been to friggin wet to do much outside. Like walking on a sponge.

Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Jebur27 on April 05, 2009, 06:22:04 am
Well, we have our most successful garden yet. 

We have about a dozen tomato plants, some of which we started from seed.  This is the first time we've had success with seeds.  Interestingly, the tomatoes that we bought already started are an heirloom variety called Homestead, so I need to learn how to save the seeds.  The tomatoes from seed are a hybrid variety. 

We also have several sugar snap peas, onions, and Swiss chard, all of which are actually growing.  The peas and chard were started from seed and the onion from sets. 

We have musk melon & water melon, although the squirrels have gotten a few of them.  They are now caged. 

Until this year, the only things with which we have been successful has been tomatoes & peppers of various types. 
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: dogsledder54 on April 05, 2009, 08:13:50 am
My garden is on hold until it stops snowing.   :angry:
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Canadian Mamma on April 05, 2009, 08:28:20 am
My garden is on hold until it stops snowing.   :angry:

tell me about it, snowed yesterday, got some brown grass poking thru some places, but the ground is still frozen solid.  Not even the crocus are stirring yet.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on April 05, 2009, 09:33:16 am
Indeed... I'm getting whiplash. It gets warm and the grass is turning green - then it snows again!! The snow isn't as deep, melts faster, and the nights are not as cold anymore, but still freezing good and hard. The tulips were coming up last week, but now are under the snow again. I hope they are ok. No sign of the crocus yet, but there is a layer of ice on the ground where they come up.

I'm almost tired of winter this year...
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: padre29 on April 05, 2009, 09:39:15 am

WE've had a massivae amount of rain this year, so much so everything is Green already and the trees are close to blooming.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Jebur27 on April 05, 2009, 12:02:45 pm
...
Interestingly, the tomatoes that we bought already started are an heirloom variety called Homestead, so I need to learn how to save the seeds. 
...
Here's a question that someone may be able to help me answer. 

When I look up the Homestead tomato plant online, some say they are determinate and some say indeterminate.  Does anybody know how to tell from the way a tomato plant grows which it is? 
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Who...me? on April 05, 2009, 01:33:06 pm
Quote
When I look up the Homestead tomato plant online, some say they are determinate and some say indeterminate.  Does anybody know how to tell from the way a tomato plant grows which it is?

Generally  determinate tomatoes grow on a small bush and reach a height of about 4 feet or so. They also produce most of their fruit around the same time then are done.

Indeterminate Tomatoes grow on a vine and keep growing and producing fruit until the frost kills them.

So if you look at a plant and it is a bush in it determinate.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: amagi on April 05, 2009, 06:59:58 pm
Today I planted what I think are the last of the seedlings.  I hope they grow.  Brocoli and cabbage, yarrow, eccinacia,two kinds of melon.  and onions.  Does anyone know if melons like being started indoors and transplanted?  If they don't, I have plenty more seed to start direct.  Do cucumbers?  Other squash?
Then I tested our emergency reaction times by getting cut pretty bad while adjusting the grow lights.  We did great.  And I didn't even need stiches. :)
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on April 11, 2009, 02:04:17 pm
Quote
Does anyone know if melons like being started indoors and transplanted?  If they don't, I have plenty more seed to start direct.  Do cucumbers?  Other squash?

You should be able to plant them either way with success. It depends on where you live and your're preference.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Who...me? on April 11, 2009, 02:42:19 pm
For anyone that kinda new to gardening. Do not forget to give your plants plenty of room. Certain types get very large taking up allot of space.

Especially all types of squash, melons, cucumbers and some cabbages. Melons are a vine type plant and will spread out quite a bit. Like 150 square feet or more. Last year my zucchini plants were 6 feet across, plant them  at least 5 feet apart. You want to have some space so you can walk around your garden for weeding and harvesting. Also you don't want your plants choking out each other.

Anyway treat your garden just you would want to live. Give "everyone" plenty of elbow room.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Johann I on April 23, 2009, 07:26:04 am

.anyone have experience with these things? She described how to set them up, but I think I need to be an octopus first... or recruit at least three other people to help with it. Also, she indicated they are fairly fragile and she didn't have any "repair kits." Can they be repaired like a plastic swimming pool or ???

How much earlier can tomatoes be put out with these things? She wasn't clear on that either.

Any ideas gratefully received.

Use a small funnel; fill about 1/3 full then another third, etc.  If a tube leaks, sacrifice a unit.  Carefully slice out one tube, slip it into the leaking tube, and fill.  You can repair 9 or 10 units this way.  You can start about a month early using these;  snow and frost don't hurt unless it's a 3-4 day continuous thing.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on April 23, 2009, 07:46:15 am
Up: Potatoes, garlic, onions, strawberries, perennial herbs, rhubarb, fruit trees, berry canes, worm wood, bee balm, lettuce, sorrel, Globe Artichokes, Cardoon, sweet potatoes (slips)

Ladies in waiting (to be transferred to the garden): tomatoes, peppers, Poppy,

Waiting (Tapping foot): Jerusalem Artichokes, Sunflowers, Pro-sorrel, mint (?)

I missed a few - ND?

mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: amagi on April 23, 2009, 07:33:24 pm
I used toilet paper tubes to plant seedlings in.  I wasn't too surprised when they got white fuzz growing around the bottom. I didn't steralize the dirt or anything.  I just used comercial potting soil and compost.  My seedlings mostly came up.  The real surprise were the tiny brown MUSHROOMS that cam up a little later.  They ran thier life in about three days.  Probably will start another cycle I imagine.  They were terribly cute though.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on April 26, 2009, 09:47:49 am
Thanks, Johann I.

Here is the saga so far:

I knew it was too early, but around the first of March I put some of my saved tomato seed in a window box just to test germination. They grew like wildfire. By April 22 they were more than two feet tall and suddenly started to fall over. The temp outside had been in the 70s during the day for a week, nights about 40 - so, I got out the wall-o-water things and planted the tomatoes. I had no problem filling the tubes with the hose.

April 23 - rain
April 24 - snow, night temp. below freezing
April 25 - snow    "
April 26 - snow    "

When the time is right I'll probably buy some tomato plants like I did last year.

Maybe next year I'll get it right.  :rolleyes:
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Klapton Isgod on April 26, 2009, 10:20:54 am
A small, makeshift greenhouse, along with the wall o water thing might have done the trick.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on April 26, 2009, 10:38:14 am
Indeed, Klapton. Sure wish I was able to build such a thing. I can't put tinker toys together to any practical purpose. sigh... we all have our separate gifts. :) At times like these it is very frustrating to be a widow alone. My husband would have made a wonderful garden for me by this time. Oh well.

Actually, I want a greenhouse very badly, and some friends here are talking about going in with me to build one. I had one for more than 20 years and know well how to operate it... just can't build one. :)

If I can get some help, I'll move my tire container garden things to a side yard where they would be better protected from wind yet get full sun. I made a mistake of putting them in the front yard and now can't move them myself.

I'll get if figured out one of these days. :)
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: amagi on April 26, 2009, 09:39:06 pm
Two out of nine pea plants came up, probably today.  It has been warm and dry here, now it is raining.  YAY!  I watered, but it isn't the same.  Stinky city water.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on April 27, 2009, 08:06:01 am
Happy dance -

 Jerusalem Artichokes have decided to joint "Garden 2009", Mountain Mint is back strong, little walnut seedlings are leafing out, watched/assisted ND in grafting more walnuts (fascinating - used a different method this time), Comfry is about 12" tall (goats are happy about that),  Pro-Sorrel is finally joining the happy dance.

New things this year: Strawberry Spinach (http://www.victoriananursery.co.uk/vegetable_seeds/strawbini_seed_strawberry_spinach/) This is supposed to produce seed easy and it would be nice to have variety in our salads. (Note: I did not purchase them here, but this site has a nice image).

Trying again:  Purple Millet

Mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: dogsledder54 on April 27, 2009, 10:36:39 pm
HOPEFULLY, tonight's freeze will be the last of the year. Garden time !  Woo-hoo !  ^_^
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on April 28, 2009, 09:05:45 am
Purple Millet has decided to join the garden. As this was 3 yo seed I wasn't sure what would happen and so I used the triad method of planting. Now that most are up, I will have to send in ND to execute the "Coup de Grass" while I cower down stairs to not hear their squeaks of protest  ^_^.

I'm such a wuss! mutti
(edited for spelling)
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Who...me? on April 28, 2009, 10:31:57 pm
Came across this from a guy in Alaska. For those that are challenged by a lack of space.

Quote
How does your garden grow?
Former Iowa resident presents a different way to plant veggies

http://www.juneauempire.com/stories/072508/nei_309624417.shtml
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on April 29, 2009, 11:28:52 am
Well, there are still miracles sometimes. After a week of snow and below freezing night temps, the tomato plants are still alive and green inside the wall-o-water things! The tops that stuck out are dead, but the rest of the plants look fine. I'm sold on those water things and will buy some now.  :laugh:
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Nomads2 on May 01, 2009, 04:51:17 pm
I haven't been following this thread, so please forgive if this is a repeat.  I was researching herbs for colds and flu, echinacea among them, and found this info in a Wiki article:

Quote
Some species of echinacea, notably E. purpurea, E. angustifolia, and E. pallida, are grown as ornamental plants in gardens.[22] They tolerate a wide variety of conditions, maintain attractive foliage throughout the season, and multiply rapidly. Appropriate species are used in prairie restorations.

Might be a good addition to any survival garden.

Here's the article:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Echinacea
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on May 03, 2009, 07:04:15 pm
Started Melons (including Jenny Lind and another we swapped with the Dares last fall. ND specifically told me the names which I promptly forgot  ^_^)

Also started extra super secret seed for Fathers Day gift for ND - fill you in later!

Question - can anyone direct me to a site/book/information about how to properly braid garlic? None of them succumbed to the cold weather and we now have - well - a plethora of garlic.

Mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Canadian Mamma on May 03, 2009, 08:47:37 pm
Mama Liberty;

What are those garden things that you are talking about? If there was something that I could use to extend the growing season that would be great.


Also I feel a little foolish but has anybody tried those Topsy Turvy planters?  For tomatoes and perhaps peppers? 

 http://www.topsygardening.com/GalleryPages/82186051_4ad6ebdb3f.html (http://www.topsygardening.com/GalleryPages/82186051_4ad6ebdb3f.html)
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on May 04, 2009, 07:00:05 am
Mutti, to braid garlic you must start with the tops intact - just before they really get dried. The semi-dry tops are the part that are braided with three strings. If you try it when the tops are totally dry, they don't bend well and make a much thicker and ragged braid, but it might be done.

Canadian Mama, those things are called "Wall-o-water" and are available at Gurney's and Henry Fields, for sure. I suspect they are available at most nursery websites and probably some specialty outfits, but I don't know. They really do seem to work wonders. All of my tomato plants are still alive below the water line, even though we had a week of night temps in the low 20s - not to mention three days of snow! It's a bloomin' miracle! :)
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on May 04, 2009, 09:24:28 am
We've been working on getting the garden area prepared, not sure if I'm going to do anything with it other than plant a variety of green manure crops. We and a neighbor broke new ground on the top of the hill.  Our tractor is down so he is using his in exchange for a patch. It has been staying too moist for the most part to get things done quickly. Dries out enough gets plowed, rains a few days and then dries, first disking, then rain etc.

Had my mini greenhouse set up in living room to start plants but so overcast put it off. Would just ended up with super leggy plants. Probably buy some.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Canadian Mamma on May 04, 2009, 11:52:24 am
Mutti, to braid garlic you must start with the tops intact - just before they really get dried. The semi-dry tops are the part that are braided with three strings. If you try it when the tops are totally dry, they don't bend well and make a much thicker and ragged braid, but it might be done.

Canadian Mama, those things are called "Wall-o-water" and are available at Gurney's and Henry Fields, for sure. I suspect they are available at most nursery websites and probably some specialty outfits, but I don't know. They really do seem to work wonders. All of my tomato plants are still alive below the water line, even though we had a week of night temps in the low 20s - not to mention three days of snow! It's a bloomin' miracle! :)


When I googled this wall o water I came across a post where this guy made his own Wall o water from empty 2 liter bottles.:

I happen to have a sudden surplus of 2 liter bottles.
And suddenly, while wondering where to store them until next year, I saw The Light !

Take six or seven 2 liter bottles. Group them around one in the center so you have a circle of bottles.

Duct tape the group together at half-way up.

Now pull out the center bottle so you have a kind of 'donut'.

Put in the garden over a new tomato transplant. Fill with water from your hose.

Instant Wall-O-Water.

Cost, 10 cents deposit each in Michigan, plus duct tape.

Plants will get some light from through the 2 liter bottles and eventually grow above them.

The heat of the sun will warm the water in the bottles.

The post goes on to explain the math of the water, BTUs stored in the water etc.... Interesting.

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/lab/msg0516363918431.html
 
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on May 04, 2009, 12:05:39 pm
Checked out the two liter bottle aritcle. Might try to remember to do it next year. It would probably take me that long to get enough bottles for one.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on May 04, 2009, 12:36:10 pm
The bottles might be great for someone with more room than I have... and who has the bottles. I get maybe one a year left behind after Thanksgiving dinner. I garden in stacks of old tires, and even one or two bottles would be too many. The big black trash bags make great row covers for the tire stacks, but don't protect well enough for really tender things like tomatoes.

I've tried the gallon milk and water jugs for hotcaps too, but the plants always outgrow them long before they stop needing protection. I'm sure you could juggle the planting time to overcome that, but I always plant too early. Just can't help it!!  :laugh:
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on May 06, 2009, 09:42:21 am
Quote
but I always plant too early. Just can't help it!!  laugh

If it hadn't been ,and still is too wet, would have already started planting. I wanted to start in march, so I set up my mini greenhouses. According to the almanacs it looks like alot of rain this year, which we really do need. But its so hard to plant in mud.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Hill_Top_Gunner on May 06, 2009, 07:29:46 pm
we are just about ready for planting, the hothouse has plenty of starts but im being told to wait till the last week of may,, some are calling for a freak freeze comin thru, the new greenhouse is lookin good.. cant wait till i get it coverd
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: socalserf on May 06, 2009, 07:44:06 pm
Hey, I used to have a green house like this once.
It was made of pvc pipe that was bent in an arc and slipped over short pieces of rebar that were pounded into the ground.
We covered it with sheet plastic.
It worked great!
We used it to keep all the rain from destroying our young seedlings not for heat retention.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Zookeeper on May 07, 2009, 12:04:50 am
Hi everybody, Is there any special tips on growing Hubbard Squash? It gets pretty hot here during the summer.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on May 07, 2009, 07:39:37 am
I don't know how "hot" hot is - we frequently spend days over 100F with nights dipping to a cool 85F.

I would think that 3 m's should do it:

Mulch: at least 8" deep straw (with drip irrigation/soaker hose under the mulch if possible)

Mist: look for preditor insects and mist with soap/water mixture. Keep an eye out for fungal issues and spray with a mixture of:

Quote
Gallon jug full of water with 1 Tbs baking soda, and 2 1/2 Tbs vegetable oil added to it. Shake the jug well. After your done add 1/2 tsp of pure castile soap. pour the mixture into a spray bottle and your ready to go.  Keep shaking the bottle as you go to keep everything mixed
.

Marry: plant crops that encourage pollination by attracting bees near it. Honeybees are the main pollanator.

Also, give plenty of space as the vines grow up to 10' long and need room to stretch.

Good luck! mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: socalserf on May 09, 2009, 09:29:43 am
We got most of our tomato's from Laurel's Heirloom Tomato's.
http://www.heirloomtomatoplants.com/
We have been waiting on half a dozen plants that were too small to release, BTW, we pre-ordered last fall.
We have been waiting a while now and not getting any response.

My wife checked her web site and found this;

"VERY IMPORTANT: 

During March, April and May, call volume is huge, more then 30 calls per 5 minute period. (Our customers begin ordering in September and October for spring planting.) Our mailbox gets full within less than 10 minutes, so ordering this late means you may not get your order to us in time to get a spring delivery.

Please leave a brief message with your name and number. Please do not leave your plant order.

Emailed orders are answered first come first served -- there may be several hundred ahead of you -- and can take at least 15 days to answer. We get about 600 email inquiries per day during this time of year.  :(

If you are ordering later then March 15th, please call until you get through or you may not get your order in this season.

I do sincerely apologize to so many of you who were not able to get your orders in on time this season; we have been completely overwhelmed by the demand for plants. ~ Laurel"
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I guess that people alot of people either have recently got into heirloom tomato's or folks have recently started gardening.

 

Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on May 13, 2009, 08:00:09 am
Nothing planted yet. working on new plots in between the rains.  Raining and down in the low 40's. It didn't rain yesterday and not suppose to rain again til tomorrow.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on May 14, 2009, 07:49:41 am
Has anyone else noticed that their friends/family have begun asking serious questions about gardening/food preserving/livestock?

Last year we had a few "Could you start X for me?" - this year we have "I have started X - how can we make it grow like yours?"
We have had 2 individuals wanting to learn to preserve their goat through summer sausage.
We have had more interest in grafting, etc.

So - what is happening around your communities?

mutti
We have had such sloggy weather that our Tomatoes cannot be put in although the Potatoes, garlic, fruit trees, etc are appreciating the weather.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: knobster on May 14, 2009, 11:14:40 am
Has anyone else noticed that their friends/family have begun asking serious questions about gardening/food preserving/livestock?

Last year we had a few "Could you start X for me?" - this year we have "I have started X - how can we make it grow like yours?"
We have had 2 individuals wanting to learn to preserve their goat through summer sausage.
We have had more interest in grafting, etc.

So - what is happening around your communities?

mutti
We have had such sloggy weather that our Tomatoes cannot be put in although the Potatoes, garlic, fruit trees, etc are appreciating the weather.

Yup.  Our neighbors asked us where we got the containers for our back porch.  They picked up a half-dozen containers for their vegetable plants.  Last year I didn't hear of anyone talking about gardening.  We can't have livestock where we live but I have heard a number of neighbors this year wish they could get some chickens.  Interesting times we live in...
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Klapton Isgod on May 14, 2009, 11:35:29 am
Has anyone else noticed that their friends/family have begun asking serious questions about gardening/food preserving/livestock?

Last year we had a few "Could you start X for me?" - this year we have "I have started X - how can we make it grow like yours?"
We have had 2 individuals wanting to learn to preserve their goat through summer sausage.
We have had more interest in grafting, etc.

So - what is happening around your communities?

mutti
We have had such sloggy weather that our Tomatoes cannot be put in although the Potatoes, garlic, fruit trees, etc are appreciating the weather.

Yup.  Our neighbors asked us where we got the containers for our back porch.  They picked up a half-dozen containers for their vegetable plants.  Last year I didn't hear of anyone talking about gardening.  We can't have livestock where we live but I have heard a number of neighbors this year wish they could get some chickens.  Interesting times we live in...

You and those neighbors should get together and stage a "Chicken Rebellion" and just do it anyway.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on May 14, 2009, 11:53:06 pm
Fortunately everyone in our neighborhood has a garden or raises livestock.  Been so wet there hasn't been much planting done.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: knobster on May 15, 2009, 04:27:40 am
You and those neighbors should get together and stage a "Chicken Rebellion" and just do it anyway.

 ^_^
That would make for a fun time indeed.

"You can take my chicken eggs when you pry them from hot, scalding frying pan!"
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on May 21, 2009, 11:27:11 am
Potted up some Dill to share/relocate ( I may have mentioned this elsewhere), ND made a raised bed out of damp strawbales which I plan to put our purple millet and lavender in, tilled some of the garden for ND to put in stuff later.  Note: ND is the tiller in the family, so this was my first attempt. I sure hope I didn't mess it up!

June bearing Strawberries are coming in nicely, a handful of blueberries are setting, and enough sorrel now for dinner instead of a "treat" with dandelion/lettuce.

mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on May 23, 2009, 04:45:59 pm
Cabbage, Tomatoes, Peanuts (purple peruvian/del Negro), pole beans. mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on May 24, 2009, 06:17:16 am
gosh mutti, I'm still waiting to plant.  It takes two days of dry weather here to be able to work in the garden, then it rains and the temperature drops.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on May 24, 2009, 08:22:15 am
gosh mutti, I'm still waiting to plant.  It takes two days of dry weather here to be able to work in the garden, then it rains and the temperature drops.

I truly understand that. We have been lucky enough this week to have 3 days with no rain and have been going nuts trying to get stuff in. With projected rain coming again - I hope the corn, cucumbers, and transplants make it in today. After I clean the milk room, barn, laundry, and daily "stuff", I'll help get in what I can.

mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Mr. Dare on May 24, 2009, 09:20:31 am
Has anyone else noticed that their friends/family have begun asking serious questions about gardening/food preserving/livestock?

Last year we had a few "Could you start X for me?" - this year we have "I have started X - how can we make it grow like yours?"
We have had 2 individuals wanting to learn to preserve their goat through summer sausage.
We have had more interest in grafting, etc.

So - what is happening around your communities?
  I have noticed this a LOT. People you wouldn't expect at all are taking an interest. We have become the "garden gurus" at work, which would be a joke except that the people who are coming to us for advice are just starting out, so we can actually help them get something going.
  We got everything in the ground last week. Had to plant one day in the wet and gooey to get it done, but it was worth it (not at the time of course, but it is now). Our Cherokee Trail of Tears beans have already climbed over the "fence" we put up for them to climb on. Those have been a great success for us, good producers, and very easy to grow, a nice black bean. Last year when the first plant started looking "tired" I started just plugging a few beans from the harvest back into the ground (not sure if they would come up or if they needed to winter over or dry out or what). They all came up, and rapidly replaced the ones that were spent.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on May 24, 2009, 02:08:07 pm
Went out and put up a cattle panel to keep the goats and cow out of the garden. Laid out some plastic i've used before to put the tomatoes in.  Then I realized I had poison ivy after looking at some growing on a post.  I don't pay much attention to me, but had a rash and finally it dawned on me what it was.  Went and got jewel weed, put it in the blender with a little olive oil so i could mix it in with the soap i make. Great year for jewel weed very succulent. Put some in the freezer for later. I usually get poison ivy from hugging my goats. Anyway will try to put out the plants we bought this past week. But can't find my panty hose for my tomato plants.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: socalserf on May 25, 2009, 08:14:21 am
I usually get poison ivy from hugging my goats.

We were at the pet mega store the other day and a lady had two Nubian goats with her. They were so cool!

We just harvested our first squash of the season, a couple crocknecks and some zucchini. Tomato's are coming soon.
The weather here has been great!
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Bear on May 25, 2009, 10:36:27 am
Quote
So - what is happening around your communities?

We get a lot of curious looks, but so far, fewer questions than last year.
I guess that's because the novelty is gone - folks know what we're doing.

I did have a funny interaction yesterday. I was out turning the soil in
the last garden bed, and this guy stops by and says that he doesn't garden
anymore. He figures that the money they used to spend on the garden
would buy a lot nice dinners out.

I chuckled good naturedly. Were do you begin with a stranger who
Just Doesn't Get It?

Bear



Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Mr. Dare on May 25, 2009, 10:47:32 am
Quote
I chuckled good naturedly. Were do you begin with a stranger who
Just Doesn't Get It?

You did good, Arguing beyond his ability or willingness to understand would only reinforce the idea that "he" is different from "you" and force him yet again to the inevitable conclusion that  "he" is right and you are "wrong". As it is, he will probably only remember seeing a nice if a bit strange guy happily gardening, and totally unconcerned that he could be eating at a restaurant instead. That's a start.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on May 25, 2009, 12:48:07 pm
My youngest sister called yesterday to ask for some more of the liquid soap I make.  She is putting my other sister and I to shame.  Baby sis lives in Orlando and was talking about her garden, I think this is her first endeavor so far she has harvested okra.  Called my other sis and she is still putting stuff on her garden area to compost.  I have grand children to day may get their help to fix my plastic.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on May 27, 2009, 07:56:57 am
June bearing strawberries are coming in. We picked 10# yesterday, cleaned 2# for dinner and 8# for freezing. I see a handful or 2 of goose berries on the 1 yo plants, Salvia is in, peppers, melons have their little heads up, and the mulberries have added to the mix. Now if we could have 2 days without rain....mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on May 27, 2009, 08:41:16 am
Quote
I see a handful or 2 of goose berries on the 1 yo plants

Just did a check gooseberries and currents are still banned in NC.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Klapton Isgod on May 27, 2009, 08:52:26 am
June bearing strawberries are coming in. We picked 10# yesterday, cleaned 2# for dinner and 8# for freezing. I see a handful or 2 of goose berries on the 1 yo plants, Salvia is in, peppers, melons have their little heads up, and the mulberries have added to the mix. Now if we could have 2 days without rain....mutti

What do you use Salvia for, Mutti?  I only recent heard about the stuff.  Does it have uses other than what most people are interested in using it for?
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on May 27, 2009, 09:19:27 am
Quote
What do you use Salvia for, Mutti?  I only recent heard about the stuff.  Does it have uses other than what most people are interested in using it for?

Salvia has many uses. Attracts butterflies and other beneficials to areas we want them to visit, eye candy, and as possible theraeputic herb. Not aware of the "other use" until this point. Mostly for pretty right now. mutti
(edited to fix link)
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Klapton Isgod on May 27, 2009, 09:28:02 am
Quote
What do you use Salvia for, Mutti?  I only recent heard about the stuff.  Does it have uses other than what most people are interested in using it for?

Salvia has many uses. Attracts butterflies and other beneficials to areas we want them to visit, eye candy, and as a possible theraeputic herb  (http://www.herbal-supplement-resource.com/sage-salvia-officinalis.html). Mostly for pretty right now. mutti

Ah, ok.  You didn't strike me as the type who was interested in its psychotropic effects.  Not that it's any of my business what people do to their own brains.  You just strike me as entirely too sensible and practical for such things.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on May 27, 2009, 09:57:46 am
Quote
Ah, ok.  You didn't strike me as the type who was interested in its psychotropic effects.  Not that it's any of my business what people do to their own brains.  You just strike me as entirely too sensible and practical for such things.

I have enough problems getting the Neurons to line up in  a reasonable fashion - no need to screw them up any further. I have heard that there are several good opportunities for anti-fungal properties, but I am still researching at this point. mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: kirgi07 on May 27, 2009, 02:22:53 pm


I have enough problems getting the Neurons to line up in  a reasonable fashion - no need to screw them up any further. I have heard that there are several good opportunities for anti-fungal properties, but I am still researching at this point. mutti
Quote

I ain't goin anywhere near that. Ought 7.   :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on May 27, 2009, 03:13:21 pm
Quote
ain't goin anywhere near that. Ought 7.   rolleyes rolleyes
- Great. Then you shouldn't need the Salvia!!! mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on May 28, 2009, 12:50:29 pm
Called daughter today to help get plants in before another deluge.  Planted oxheart, roma, mr. stripey, red brandywine, and beefsteak tomatoes. Also planted some peppers. I put powdered milk in the tomato holes, hope that works as good as pouring milk on them. Also put a penny in with each plant.  Got everything in and us off the hill before the lightening strike and a deluge. The straw for mulching is soaked took two of us to get a small bale up the hill.  also set out a rhubarb plant. Hope the torrential rain did not beat everything to death.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: FUBAR on May 28, 2009, 07:20:33 pm
I lucked out with 12 free strawberry plants yesterday, that I added to the 75 I put in a few weeks back.  ^_^ I've got more damn tomatoes than heinz this year...which is better than not enough last year when I figured out how many I "need" for canning sauce and chili...
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Jebur27 on May 28, 2009, 07:32:22 pm
We got nine (heirloom Homestead) tomatoes & three hybrids (started from seed [our first time, successfully]).  The Homesteads are about waist high & are doing surprisingly well considering that we were out of town for a month.  One of them has some tomatoes on it & the rest are budding. 

I'll get some practice saving the tomato seeds.  Apparently, for best results, it's not as easy as drying them out and stashing them. 
http://faq.gardenweb.com/faq/lists/seedsave/2002084456024410.html
http://www.victoryseeds.com/information/seedsave_tomato.html
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Mr. Dare on May 28, 2009, 07:46:16 pm
Great links Jebur, this is also the way we do it. Using a coffee filter instead of a paper towel is excellent advice since the seeds will tend to adhere to a paper towel. We prefer to paper envelopes to plastic bags since we have had less problems with mold as long as they are stored in a dry place. By all means though folks should use what works best for them. I imagine plastic might work better if humidity is a problem where you are.Just make sure the seeds are bone dry before you put them in. I have also found the sprayer attachment on our kitchen sink does a better job of rinsing than just running under the faucet. For a sieve, you can use one of those little screen types with a handle, or one of those drain screens they sell (usually a buck or two at most) in most grocery stores.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: synchro on May 28, 2009, 09:21:25 pm
Regds Salvia:

There are many types of Salvia in the garden center.
Most likely none of them is the one with properties.
I have experienced a few properties of plants over the years,
and that one was no big whoop.

Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: FUBAR on May 28, 2009, 11:30:36 pm
We got nine (heirloom Homestead) tomatoes & three hybrids (started from seed [our first time, successfully]).  The Homesteads are about waist high & are doing surprisingly well considering that we were out of town for a month.  One of them has some tomatoes on it & the rest are budding. 

I'll get some practice saving the tomato seeds.  Apparently, for best results, it's not as easy as drying them out and stashing them. 
http://faq.gardenweb.com/faq/lists/seedsave/2002084456024410.html
http://www.victoryseeds.com/information/seedsave_tomato.html

This is the first year planted all from seed.  So far not counting "volunteers" cropping back from last year we have 27 tomatoe plants, all doing well (NO JINX).  We put seed into our inside window boxes starting in late February.  (Lots of pots, and recyled trays with compost and potting soil) Thats how we started our peppers, squash, an cukes, also.  We seed planted outside our melons, pumpkins and corn.

NOTE: We have to re-seed this week some squash and zuch that "got ate but for the stem".

Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: FUBAR on May 28, 2009, 11:40:37 pm
on a side note....my mother in law and I (we live next door to one another and, contrary to popular culture, this is possible) put a tomato plant in one of those "Topsy turvy" upside down torture rack growing 'things" as advertised on TV.  (We found it at one of the few remaining Roses stores for $5) and hung it on an apple tree a scant few feet from the 3 gardens.

Why?

As an example to the other tomatoes.

Grow.  Produce. Or this is your fate! :laugh:
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Gypsy on May 28, 2009, 11:48:22 pm
tomato intimidation????? I wonder if that will work with jalapeno peppers?
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: FUBAR on May 29, 2009, 01:11:22 am
tomato intimidation????? I wonder if that will work with jalapeno peppers?

No, jalapenos work best with reverse psychology...
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: livinright on May 29, 2009, 02:25:04 am
Psssht, jalapenos are easy.........now how about those Hungarians?

(Actually one of my favorites for chili, but I use several)
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: socalserf on May 29, 2009, 02:39:50 am
Psssht, jalapenos are easy.........now how about those Hungarians?


Hungarians can be very difficult. Just ask the Russians about 1956!

 
But seriously, we are Pablaono pepper fans. And they are doing very well.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: livinright on May 29, 2009, 02:44:36 am
Ha, somehow I knew you'd bite. hehe

Pablanonos are very tasty too, I agree.  :drool:  Close to same flavor actually as I recall.

This garden thread always makes me hungry. I'm going back to the irritating stuff. :)
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on May 29, 2009, 06:25:40 am
Usually when I start seeds indoors they get too leggy. They come up with long skinny little stems and don't seem to put on any thickness and that is with bright sunny days. This year with little to no bright sunny days, I just bought my few plants.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on May 29, 2009, 07:02:14 am
Usually when I start seeds indoors they get too leggy. They come up with long skinny little stems and don't seem to put on any thickness and that is with bright sunny days. This year with little to no bright sunny days, I just bought my few plants.

You probably need grow lights. Leggy, thin stemmed plants will take longer to adjust to outdoor conditions - if they live at all - than it would take to just plant seeds outdoors (in a sheltered place) when the weather settles.

If tomato plants are long stemmed, however, you can plant them deep so that only the top four leaves are above the soil. They will make new roots all along the buried stem and grow even better than if they'd been put in as short plants the ordinary way. Or plant the root at slightly lower depth than normal more or less on its side, and then lay the stem in a shallow trench and bury all but the top four leaves. The plant will probably send up more than one stem as well as create more roots. This is a good way to increase your crop of a rare breed or if you only have a few plants to start with.

They are actually perennials in their native environment. If they are carefully nurtured and not allowed to get cold or dried out, a plant will live for years. They are simply not as productive after the first year, which is a good reason to continue to treat them as annuals. Tomatoes are remarkable plants.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on May 29, 2009, 08:27:39 am
Quote
Psssht, jalapenos are easy.........now how about those Hungarians?
(Actually one of my favorites for chili, but I use several)

Ever seen Seed Savers Yearbook? 12 pages of 8 font type packed with different Hot peppers - almost better than, well you never know who might be reading  :rolleyes: . Ancho's to smoke for red pepper jam, Big Jim for drizzling with olive oil/sea salt and oven roasting, Brazilian Rainbow - purty and hot, and the ubiquitous "Ouchie Mama's" (which are probably Jamaican Mushrooms). Yum Yum Yum!

Quote
If tomato plants are long stemmed, however, you can plant them deep so that only the top four leaves are above the soil. They will make new roots all along the buried stem and grow even better than if they'd been put in as short plants the ordinary way.

An excellent point ML. ND uses a post hole digger to get a good depth and tosses in some compost/goat berries at the bottom of the hole.

I really love this time of year!

mutti

Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on May 29, 2009, 08:56:53 am
Quote
If tomato plants are long stemmed, however, you can plant them deep so that only the top four leaves are above the soil. They will make new roots all along the buried stem and grow even better than if they'd been put in as short plants the ordinary way. Or plant the root at slightly lower depth than normal more or less on its side, and then lay the stem in a shallow trench and bury all but the top four leaves.

The plants I bought were tall, so used an ost planting bar to make a hole for them. worked out pretty good.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Jebur27 on May 29, 2009, 09:01:14 am
Great links Jebur, this is also the way we do it. Using a coffee filter instead of a paper towel is excellent advice since the seeds will tend to adhere to a paper towel. We prefer to paper envelopes to plastic bags since we have had less problems with mold as long as they are stored in a dry place. By all means though folks should use what works best for them. I imagine plastic might work better if humidity is a problem where you are.Just make sure the seeds are bone dry before you put them in. I have also found the sprayer attachment on our kitchen sink does a better job of rinsing than just running under the faucet. For a sieve, you can use one of those little screen types with a handle, or one of those drain screens they sell (usually a buck or two at most) in most grocery stores.

Yeah, vegetable products in contact with plastic is often a problem.  For instance, if I put a cut bell pepper in a plastic bag, it rots more quickly.  So I wrap it in a paper towel first & it lasts for a relatively long time (a week or more).  

What I think I'll try is putting the seeds in a paper towel or envelope & then putting that in a plastic bag.  The paper keeps the seeds from contact with the plastic but the plastic will better isolate them from the environment.  
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: padre29 on May 29, 2009, 09:47:16 pm


Need a bit of advice, my Tomato and Green Pepper plants are starting to lean over, I know I need to stake them in a upright position, but I have no idea what I should use to tie them off to the stakes?

Bread Ties? String? Zip ties?
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on May 29, 2009, 10:26:55 pm


Need a bit of advice, my Tomato and Green Pepper plants are starting to lean over, I know I need to stake them in a upright position, but I have no idea what I should use to tie them off to the stakes?

Bread Ties? String? Zip ties?

Nylons. Give in the wind, stretch to hold growing plants, do not produce contact wounds (such as the zip tie might). Why not just cage them? mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: padre29 on May 29, 2009, 11:20:24 pm


Need a bit of advice, my Tomato and Green Pepper plants are starting to lean over, I know I need to stake them in a upright position, but I have no idea what I should use to tie them off to the stakes?

Bread Ties? String? Zip ties?

Nylons. Give in the wind, stretch to hold growing plants, do not produce contact wounds (such as the zip tie might). Why not just cage them? mutti

Why not cage them...err...well...I'm a bit of a fatalist Mutti, they will live or die on their own....but leaning over on the ground...

Err...Tomatos and Peppers are vines at heart aren't they...?!?
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: livinright on May 29, 2009, 11:35:17 pm
Mutti is sooo right. I love using nylons, they have worked best. Ties and string cause too much stress. Cages are good too, but pricey.

This year, I'm using my hanging flower planters and growing them upside down. Our ground is VERY wet here, and the fungus is sure to be a problem, even if we do keep them off the ground.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: kirgi07 on May 30, 2009, 12:24:54 am
Dewd,Listen ta Mutti.They need support.Either strings ta climb or cages.Your call. Ought 7.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on May 30, 2009, 07:54:28 am
I used to make tomato "cages" out of old wood pallets. Three of them, tied together with baling wire in a triangle shape, protect the plants from wind and gives you something to tie them to. The old nylons work wonderfully for that, but so do strips of cloth cut from old sheets or whatever.  Tie loosely. Then just reach through the wide slats to harvest the fruit!

Peppers are not a vine type, however, and I've never needed to stake them. If the pepper plants are leggy and weak stemmed, you either started them in the house with insufficient light, or possibly have a mineral deficit in the soil.  Peppers, like tomatoes, can be planted much deeper than they stood in the nursery row or containers if you started them in the house. They will develop a stronger root system and won't need staking.

You might test your soil if things are coming up with weak stems.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Mr. Dare on May 30, 2009, 08:10:15 am
   We have made cages from chicken wire, and other fence wire. They may need to be staked down of otherwise supported though, if the plant wants to lean in one direction it will just pull a light cage with it. Nylons are the best once the plants are up and leaning everywhichaway, your plants do need some sort of support though if you want to eat tomatoes. The plant will reproduce just fine if the fruit rots on the ground (and evolution kind of stops there), but you will get no BLTs! :rolleyes:
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on May 30, 2009, 08:44:17 am
To cage or not to cage - that is the question  ^_^.

Why ND and I cage (and how):

Our tomatoes tend to hit the 5' - 6' mark about August. If we let them trail on the ground we lose space, tomatoes, and ability to dust with DE over the entire plant. 

It is easier to cage and pick/see the tomatoes when the plants are upright. Also, every year we have small birds take up residence and help with the insect control.

We use salvaged or purchase concrete wire. If you do have to purchase the wire, realize that you will be making an investment that over time will pay off. We have used the same cages for 6 years now. At the end of the year we stack them up, burn off the vines (and hence diseases that might decide to hang around), and wait until the next year to use them again.

1. Cut 4.5' - 5' of wire off of the roll ensuring to leave one end intact and the other with the horizontal members sticking out. Wrap the loose piece of wire around the other end forming a "cage".

2. Dig a hole 4" deep a bit larger than the diameter of the cage. Dig your tomato hole. Compost in the bottom of the hole. Pop in tomato. Place cage over hole. Water in. Place mulch/straw at base of cage, but not touching stem/leaves. (We cheat. We just pull back the mulch of a prepared bed, dig hole, put in tomato and cage. We used a mulching system for weed control).

3. Stake your cage if need be or pre-cut the bottom horizontal wire where you have "self staking" cages.

The only advice I can give besides the above is if you grow large slicers, etc - don't use chicken wire. The first year we grew some beauts - but we could not get them out of the cages through the sides and the cages were so tall we were unable to reach down in and get them out!

You can sort of see the cages here:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/22465254@N04/2731967758/

But just like any other piece of advice - here is some SALT! lol.

mutti

Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on May 30, 2009, 09:43:46 am
This year am reusing black plastic, straw mulch, stakes, nylons, powdered milk (it is just too wet to water with diluted milk), pennies, . trying to hit all bases.  If your tomatoes ever are black inside it is a calcium defiency. Calcium also helps the integrity of plants.

If you are in an early or late blight area you can spray the soil with 1% hydrogen peroxide. And the foliage.

Onion diseases, excellent pictures.

http://wihort.uwex.edu/fruitveggies/Diseases/OnionD_files/v3_document.htm



Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on May 30, 2009, 09:48:03 am
I've never found any kind of wire cage useful for tomatoes, simply because I've always lived where there was a LOT of wind and heat. The wind beats the plants against the wire, shredding them - or the wire gets so hot the plants touching it are cooked.

We burned the used pallets for firewood in the winter and always started out with new ones. We didn't really have problems with plant disease or mold there in the desert, so they were ideal for us.  Galvanized wire is certainly durable and clean, just has a few limitations like anything else.

But I had to laugh at the description of the lost tomatoes in the wire cage. The only time I tried to use wire cages, I had several tomatoes grow inside the mesh and were, of course, destroyed trying to remove them if I didn't see them in time. 

I'm curious why you would use milk on plants, crepemyrtle. If you need to add calcium, I'd think bone meal would be much less expensive. I've never lived where there was any sort of mineral deficiency - the problem usually being too much of certain minerals - calcium included.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on May 30, 2009, 10:08:04 am
Quote
I'm curious why you would use milk on plants, crepemyrtle. If you need to add calcium, I'd think bone meal would be much less expensive. I've never lived where there was any sort of mineral deficiency - the problem usually being too much of certain minerals - calcium included.

I usually have some sort of  milk. I may have bonemeal somewhere, but I usually know where regular milk is. I am still trying to find where I put my wettable sulphur.

When we moved here in 96 the garden area was about dead. Years of 10-10-10 and nothing put back to make the soil live. Could dig in it forever and not find an earthworm. Weve been putting back and there is plenty of life.

I doubt if I'll do it, but am always ready to get certifed organic. (more money to be made) . But way too much friggin paperwork involved.

Hydrogen peroide in the garden link:

http://www.using-hydrogen-peroxide.com/peroxide-garden.html
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Jebur27 on May 30, 2009, 12:28:56 pm
...

Err...Tomatos and Peppers are vines at heart aren't they...?!?
Tomatoes are.  Peppers are not (at least, in my experience). 
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: FUBAR on May 30, 2009, 11:46:00 pm



Nylons. Give in the wind, stretch to hold growing plants, do not produce contact wounds (such as the zip tie might). Why not just cage them? mutti

100% nylons...I had to do this 5 years ago after moving and not being able to find cages Anywhere...I still joke with my gardening partner (mother inlaw) when ever we see cages now..

"Hey look, tomato cages, hmmm...how bout that...."  Now the damn things are at the dollar store.   We were using chicken wire, bamboo and string. (once again, I go on a tomato torture tangent)
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: padre29 on May 31, 2009, 02:06:30 pm
I used to make tomato "cages" out of old wood pallets. Three of them, tied together with baling wire in a triangle shape, protect the plants from wind and gives you something to tie them to. The old nylons work wonderfully for that, but so do strips of cloth cut from old sheets or whatever.  Tie loosely. Then just reach through the wide slats to harvest the fruit!

Peppers are not a vine type, however, and I've never needed to stake them. If the pepper plants are leggy and weak stemmed, you either started them in the house with insufficient light, or possibly have a mineral deficit in the soil.  Peppers, like tomatoes, can be planted much deeper than they stood in the nursery row or containers if you started them in the house. They will develop a stronger root system and won't need staking.

You might test your soil if things are coming up with weak stems.

The pepper plant is actually doing fine, both of them are, the 'mater plant is drooopsssyyy but I staked it upright.

I doubt it will be very productive though, my space limitations means the pepper and tomato plants are sort of crowding together.

They are in a 36 inch around pot, but all the rain we've had has sort of kicked their growth into "overdrive".

The pepper plant is already producing green peppers...
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Mr. Dare on May 31, 2009, 02:09:29 pm
A 36 inch pot shouldn't crowd them overly. Glad you got the 'mater staked, it should do much better that way.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on May 31, 2009, 04:30:17 pm
Speaking of tomato cages you could make some kinghell ones with cattle panels and would probably last and last. Wish I had thought of that earlier, dang.  Would be really easy to put hands in and pick . They are also good for growing beans on.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: socalserf on May 31, 2009, 04:50:46 pm
Hey Mutti!
We use concrete re-enforcing wire too.
It's called Re-mesh at the hardware store.
We have been using it for years and it holds up well in our climate.
We have gone through two 50 ft. rolls. I'm not sure how many cages we have, 30 maybe?
Each cage has ten squares with the end wire bent back on the cage to keep it together.
We use them for tomato, peppers, and cucumbers

Yesterday we got the first two tomato's, a couple of 'Sweet Pea' currant types. TINY AS PEAS. But, sweet!
http://www.territorialseed.com/product/9924/230

We finally got our "trombetta" squash in the ground at last. These are one of our favorites, but we have to start them from seed.
http://www.reneesgarden.com/seeds/packpg/veg/squash-trombetta.htm

One more thing. Our soil doesn't have a lot of minerals, and sometimes the tomato plants don't set fruit.
They flower just fine, but no fruit.
So my wife looked it up and found that lack of calcium could be the problem.
Now when we plant tomato's each plant gets a couple of crushed Tums antacid tablets, no more problems.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Zookeeper on June 01, 2009, 12:37:37 am
Would that go for squash too? They flower fine but than dry up and fall off. I don't think its lack of bees cause theres a huge Bottle brush and a lot of Marigolds around.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on June 01, 2009, 06:45:09 am
Quote
Would that go for squash too? They flower fine but than dry up and fall off. I don't think its lack of bees cause theres a huge Bottle brush and a lot of Marigolds around.

Did some searching and all I could find about squash not producing is lack of pollination . If that is the problem you could use a small paint brush and do the pollination. Have you actually seen any pollinating by the bees on your squash plants?

Could be the type of marigolds planted.

Quote
First, avoid horticultural plants that are described as "double". This usually means that the plant has been selected to develop extra petals instead of anthers. So there will be little or no pollen available for bees. All bees need pollen as food for their offspring, and will not be attracted to double flowers unless they happen to produce lots of nectar. Marigolds, mums, many roses, etc. will attract few bees species unless you plant the single varieties.

http://www.pollinatorparadise.com/solitary_bees/beegarden.htm#Bee%20Garden
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on June 01, 2009, 07:35:59 am
Some tomato varieties have temp. limits to their ability to set fruit. I believe that if the temps fall below 50F for some varieties that the flower will "fall off".  In theory, Tomatoes are self pollinating, however if they are in a sheltered area that has no bees or wind to encourage the pollen from spreading, one could always do a quick walk about and jiggle the cage to encourage the pollen to fly about?

This is a helpful forum for growing tomatoes: http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/tomato/

As for squash: http://plantanswers.tamu.edu/vegetables/squash.html
Quote
Squash have male and female blossoms on the same plant (monoecious). The male blossom is borne on a slender stalk. The female blossom has the swollen embryonic fruit attached at its base. The blossoms of both sexes are open and fertile only during the morning hours of one day. During this time pollen must be transferred by bees or by a person using an artists paint brush or Q-Tip, the female blossom will close without being fertilized, the squash will not enlarge and in a few days it will drop from the plant to the ground. The male blossom may open a second day, but the pollen will no longer be fertile and the blossom will close, wilt and drop from the plant that day or the next. There are many more male blossoms than female blossoms on a squash plant. There may be 3 to 4 male blossoms opening for several days to a week before the first female blossoms open
.

Is it one type of squash that you have issues with? Did you save the seeds from previous years?

mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on June 01, 2009, 08:09:56 am
Quote
I believe that if the temps fall below 50F for some varieties that the flower will "fall off". 

It was in the mid-forties this morning, so maybe it was good that I got my tomatoes in late.

Hope to plant the onions today. It is suppose to start raining again late this evening.

But I am watching my grandson today at least until his cousins can take over. He's so cute 2 months old and very cute now cuz hes asleep.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Zookeeper on June 01, 2009, 10:39:09 am
Thanks for all the replies.
Ill try the paint brush trick. I'm going out to watch my squash :laugh:to see if any bees land on them.
The marigolds are some my daughter gave me don't know the kind but does have multiple blooms on them.
Its all of the squash, so I'm thinking Its bees or lack there of.
The only squash seed I saved was from a small hard shell squash that a friend gave us. He got it as a volunteer. I don't know what kind it is.
That thing lasted for a whole year on my kitchen counter and when I cut it open it was just as fresh and tasty as the other ones we had eaten the year before.
Thats why I'm trying Hubbard this year. Its supposed to store for along time.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on June 01, 2009, 11:20:22 am
Quote
Thats why I'm trying Hubbard this year. Its supposed to store for along time.

We ate our last Hubbard in March. mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: synchro on June 01, 2009, 08:34:41 pm
We do Marina di Chioggia for storage squash.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on June 01, 2009, 08:53:15 pm


Last year's small bucket garden showed me that there is simply not enough space available to grow foodstuffs in sufficient quantity to make it pay off.

So this year my garden shall be herbs like Basil and Thyme and jalapenos and maybe a nice high yielding tomato plant or three.

Field onions work well as well, and they are great in scrambled eggs.

Proof yer wrong:
http://urbanhomestead.org/about
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on June 07, 2009, 11:31:57 am
Got our seed corn in. Today was the last day to plant above ground . Next would have been around the 24th.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: socalserf on June 07, 2009, 11:45:20 am
We are eating squash three times a week.
Had enough egglpant for one meal
Tomatos, still waiting.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: knobster on June 15, 2009, 05:11:56 am
Yesterday the family and I enjoyed our (first ever) home-grown broccoli.  My wife's eyes lit up with the first bite as did mine.  We couldn't believe how sweet it tasted!  Even my finicky son wanted more than one bite.  My wife's next statement was along the lines of "let's look into UV lighting for indoor gardening!"  We are anxiously awaiting the green peppers that are growing before our eyes.  (About the size of ping-pong balls)
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: debeez on June 15, 2009, 05:43:00 am
I've been working hard on expanding our gardens (flower, vegetative and herbal) this year. Let's see, we have:
Green onion (I haven't picked it in 2 years. I just wait for it to form a seedhead, spread the seeds around and wait for the 'crop' to enlarge)
Strawberries (the little one found tons this year)
Garlic (again, I don't pick it, I use it as a companion plant around my rosebushes and voila! no aphids!)
Okra (found seed I had harvested from plants in 2005 and was surprised by how many of them sprouted)
Asparagus
Yellow summer squash (yumm this has just started coming in and I had one for breakfast yesterday)
Broccoli (planted late, we'll see how it does)
Radishes
Horseradish
Lettuces (I often let them bolt and seed throughout the garden)
Kale (This came back from last year and is now bolted, flowered, and has seed pods on it)
Herbs: Cilantro, Parsley, Spearmint (I love that 'weed' it can take over my whole yard!), Lemon balm, Lemon verbena, Tarragon, Basil, Thyme, Lavender, Rosemary, Chives, Oregano, Marjoram (huge, healthy plant that has been increasing for three years now), Sage (huge frickin' bushes), and more I just can't remember right now.
Tomatoes (I threw some tomatoes right back down on the ground and they sprouted from seed and grew this year, as well as the new plants we had planted)
Carrots

I'm trying to pay better attention to the compost pile. I usually just pile stuff in and forget about it, I don't even turn it regularly. It was nearly three years before I actually took anything out of it for the first time, so I know I'm doing something wrong!

I got a, pardon the expression, shit ton of mulch for free. Over two truck loads of it. We mulched our front flower beds, the walkways between the raised 'crop' beds in the back and even made two winding paths through our back yard. I'm busy searching the free boards (Freecycle, Craig's List) for more mulch to top up the beds and even possibly create MORE mulched paths. I love the stuff!

I'm going to post pictures soon. I'll probably put them in my "What the Hell" blog (see link below). But for now, off to deal with legal matters.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: dogsledder54 on June 15, 2009, 10:26:44 pm
The recent alternating rain/sunshine/rain helped my zuccini immensely. Things are looking up.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: amagi on June 15, 2009, 11:24:53 pm
What is good to use as bait for a woodchuck?  The only trap I have is a live one.  I'll have to kill it with one shot as we are in the city.  But I'm not sure how to get him in there.  He's eating the seedlings.  Cucumbers are totally gone, brocoli and cabbages are nearly gone.  It makes me want to cry.  Or shoot him.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: dogsledder54 on June 16, 2009, 12:45:42 am
What is good to use as bait for a woodchuck?  The only trap I have is a live one.  I'll have to kill it with one shot as we are in the city.  But I'm not sure how to get him in there.  He's eating the seedlings.  Cucumbers are totally gone, brocoli and cabbages are nearly gone.  It makes me want to cry.  Or shoot him.
Have you tried a female  woodchuck ?
 :laugh:
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on June 16, 2009, 04:05:57 am
What is good to use as bait for a woodchuck?  The only trap I have is a live one.  I'll have to kill it with one shot as we are in the city.  But I'm not sure how to get him in there.  He's eating the seedlings.  Cucumbers are totally gone, brocoli and cabbages are nearly gone.  It makes me want to cry.  Or shoot him.

Use a canon, It wont matter where you hit 'em, he'll die from one shot.
Or you could build a deadfall or punji pit, and kill it thata way. Or, an airgun, or blowgun, which being quiet, won't piss off the neighbours.
Or build a poacher's trap. It's just a gun and a tripwire, the gopher waddles right over it to get yer veggies, 'n' gits shot. Simple.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Canadian Mamma on June 16, 2009, 06:41:23 am
Last frost has finally come and gone, or so they tell us.   Very late this year.  I almost feel like it's too late to get much done,.

Farmers are just planting corn now, so late.

Some tomatoes, peppers, herbs and spices this year.  Spending almost every weekend and a few weeks here and there camping out in different areas looking for what will pass as our perfect retreat.

Something has got to go, so I guess the combination of the reality of our existence this year means, not much of a garden. 

On  a happy note the raspberry and strawberry plants are doing really well, lots of wild new growth this year.



Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Who...me? on June 16, 2009, 10:18:07 am
What is good to use as bait for a woodchuck?  The only trap I have is a live one.  I'll have to kill it with one shot as we are in the city.  But I'm not sure how to get him in there.  He's eating the seedlings.  Cucumbers are totally gone, brocoli and cabbages are nearly gone.  It makes me want to cry.  Or shoot him.

Use a canon, It wont matter where you hit 'em, he'll die from one shot.
Or you could build a deadfall or punji pit, and kill it thata way. Or, an airgun, or blowgun, which being quiet, won't piss off the neighbours.
Or build a poacher's trap. It's just a gun and a tripwire, the gopher waddles right over it to get yer veggies, 'n' gits shot. Simple.


Many of your traps here GD could hurt someone other than the intended target and so should be avoided.  I use gas bombs that I get at the hardware store. A woodchuck (we call then groundhogs here) will be easy to track back to it's burrow. When you find the main entrance remember they always have an escape route so find that too. Cover one of the entrances (I use a shovel and fill in the one hole using the dirt excavated when it was dug) and throw a couple of the bombs down the other hole (following the directions) and then cover the remaining hole. Now cover the open hole (I use a piece of plywood and a couple cinder blocks) making sure the animal can't just knock it open or easily dig out in the short time they have left. Then next day just fill in the holes and wait to see if anyone survived. I have never had to bomb more that twice.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on June 16, 2009, 10:37:00 am
Put up a solar fence charger on sunday it rained on monday still overcast today. It doesn't look very good for protecting our open pollinated corn.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on June 16, 2009, 12:08:08 pm
ND gave me the only Black Current on our new plant - it was so good. Hopefully we'll have more next year!

Quote
Put up a solar fence charger on sunday

What brand? I like ours. mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Mr. Dare on June 16, 2009, 05:05:34 pm
What is good to use as bait for a woodchuck?  The only trap I have is a live one.  I'll have to kill it with one shot as we are in the city.  But I'm not sure how to get him in there.  He's eating the seedlings.  Cucumbers are totally gone, brocoli and cabbages are nearly gone.  It makes me want to cry.  Or shoot him.

   How big is the rascal? Some wood chucks get over 20 pounds and can be pretty tough. Being in town, the trap might be the best solution. I would try peanut butter, or maybe some grocery store sweet corn (if he really likes the succulents) Too bad you aren't out in the boonies, as a varmint rifle would be the best prescription in that case. Good luck!
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: dogsledder54 on June 16, 2009, 05:10:35 pm

What !  No sense of humor ?
   :laugh:
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on June 17, 2009, 07:23:46 am
Quote
What brand? I like ours. mutti

I think it is called fi-shock. Couldn't afford the one we really wanted. However since I put it up it has been foggy, cloudy, delugeing. I think it is suppose to start clearing tomorrow.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on June 17, 2009, 04:59:37 pm
What is good to use as bait for a woodchuck?  The only trap I have is a live one.  I'll have to kill it with one shot as we are in the city.  But I'm not sure how to get him in there.  He's eating the seedlings.  Cucumbers are totally gone, brocoli and cabbages are nearly gone.  It makes me want to cry.  Or shoot him.

Use a canon, It wont matter where you hit 'em, he'll die from one shot.
Or you could build a deadfall or punji pit, and kill it thata way. Or, an airgun, or blowgun, which being quiet, won't piss off the neighbours.
Or build a poacher's trap. It's just a gun and a tripwire, the gopher waddles right over it to get yer veggies, 'n' gits shot. Simple.


Many of your traps here GD could hurt someone other than the intended target and so should be avoided.  I use gas bombs that I get at the hardware store. A woodchuck (we call then groundhogs here) will be easy to track back to it's burrow. When you find the main entrance remember they always have an escape route so find that too. Cover one of the entrances (I use a shovel and fill in the one hole using the dirt excavated when it was dug) and throw a couple of the bombs down the other hole (following the directions) and then cover the remaining hole. Now cover the open hole (I use a piece of plywood and a couple cinder blocks) making sure the animal can't just knock it open or easily dig out in the short time they have left. Then next day just fill in the holes and wait to see if anyone survived. I have never had to bomb more that twice.

Obviously the cannon was a joke, and the gun in the poacher's trap  should be placed so it points in a safe direction, and should be a muzzeloader with a rocksalt load.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Who...me? on June 17, 2009, 07:37:47 pm
Sorry.  I missed the little smiley face  :laugh:  letting me know you were joking when you suggested using several very dangerous traps left unattended. What about the kid you didn't think about that steps in front of your poachers trap and get shot at close range with a load of rocksalt.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on June 17, 2009, 07:42:59 pm
Oops, I don't have any kids, so I forget about them sometimes. Good point though.
Rocksalt was used by the british for crowd control up untill the mid 1800's.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Klapton Isgod on June 17, 2009, 07:49:31 pm
My dad got a butt full of rocksalt when he was a kid for stealing watermelons.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on June 17, 2009, 08:00:11 pm
My dad got a butt full of rocksalt when he was a kid for stealing watermelons.


There any more to that story?
I'd sure like to hear it.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Klapton Isgod on June 17, 2009, 10:44:10 pm
My dad got a butt full of rocksalt when he was a kid for stealing watermelons.


There any more to that story?
I'd sure like to hear it.

It was Kansas, in the 1930s.  He was tagging along after some older boys.  When the older boys saw the farmer come out of the house with his shotgun, they dropped their melons and bolted.  My dad, being younger, dumber, and slower, was trying to push his watermelon under the fence ahead of him when he got a butt full or rocksalt from the farmer.

He had to tell his parents what happened, so they could pick the salt out of his butt with tweezers.  Once that operation was done, he got the razor strap too.

Needless to say, he never pulled a stunt like that again.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on June 18, 2009, 01:46:30 am
Maybe I should make a few salt loads for my gun...
Perhaps a salt/beanbag combo.
The salt replacing the pellets in the bag. I bet that'd hurt like hell.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: kirgi07 on June 18, 2009, 04:02:55 am
Rock salt will burn/F--k your bbl up.It's supper corrosive.If you plan ta do this get a NEF/or similar type shottie that it won't cost ya all that much ta replace/disgard. Ought 7.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on June 18, 2009, 08:24:04 am
just find someone with hunting dogs. they make short work of critters in the garden.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on June 18, 2009, 03:10:10 pm
Had a break in the delugeing, looks to be ready to start again. However we did get the rest of the electric fence up today.  Started thundering in the distance so my son and I kind of hurried. Don't like being on top of the hill when the storms come. The corn is coming up nicely, we may have some good seed corn this year.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on June 18, 2009, 04:12:14 pm
Rock salt will burn/F--k your bbl up.It's supper corrosive.If you plan ta do this get a NEF/or similar type shottie that it won't cost ya all that much ta replace/disgard. Ought 7.

Hmmm...
What if I invented some kind of special cup/sabot/wad for the salt so it never touches my gun's barrel? Like the kind the fuzz use for breeching loads?
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on June 18, 2009, 05:00:29 pm
I found a little bitty green tomato!

It's no bigger than a pencil point right now, but it seems the blossoms are starting to set in spite of the low temps. I don't think it's been above 50 at night yet. I've got lots more seed, if anyone wants some. Seems they don't mind the cool temps. Indeterminate, I'm pretty sure as they put out new bloom fans all summer and long into the fall - even after I'd cut it back thinking the season was over!

These are a grape type cherry tomato, very sweet and hardy otherwise. They tolerated the wind and heat last summer and I got a lot of fruit from just four plants. PM if you want seed.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: knobster on June 19, 2009, 05:33:09 am
I harvested two heads (is that the proper term?  crowns perhaps?) of broccoli yesterday and felt pretty good about it until my darling wife quipped, "that's a nice $30 broccoli!".  Sigh...

I purchased an Earthbox for the back patio and we were able to plant two broccoli, two green peppers and two strawberry plants.  The entire setup cost $85.  I told her that we would harvest quite a few strawberries and green peppers from the box as well but her attitude was the same.  "A lot cheaper and faster to get it from the store!"  I sure have my work cut out for me...
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: NuclearDruid on June 19, 2009, 06:28:55 am
I harvested two heads (is that the proper term?  crowns perhaps?) of broccoli yesterday and felt pretty good about it until my darling wife quipped, "that's a nice $30 broccoli!".  Sigh...

Commercial growers pull the plant after cutting off the crowns. Don't! The plants will continue to produce side shoots every few weeks. I've had some plants that look like small shrubs before a killing freeze gets them.

That broccoli was cheaper than going to a movie and the equipment that you invested in will last much longer than 2 hours.

ND
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on June 19, 2009, 07:12:54 am
I just harvested heirloom tomatoes, radishes, lemon balm, sage, and I plan to harvest the rest of my new potatoes later today. Also 1 of my small-leaf tobacco plants came up and then bolted for some reason. Does anyone know why that might be? It grew just fine when I lived in Ohio. Also I just thought I'd give a warning: DO NOT BUY BULK SEED AT BELL'S SEED STORE IN FAYETTEVILLE, NC. More than half of my flint corn did not sprout. (Flint corn is the kind most often used for making; tamales, sopes, corn tortillias, and other native foods.)
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on June 19, 2009, 09:54:36 am
Quote
lso I just thought I'd give a warning: DO NOT BUY BULK SEED AT BELL'S SEED STORE IN FAYETTEVILLE, NC. More than half of my

A lot of places just hold their seeds over and over, year after year, I have bought seeds from some places and no germination of one kind and another just fine.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on June 19, 2009, 10:35:09 am
Dug up the Elephant Garlic (2 rows about 12 heads softball size) and the Nootka Rose  garlic (soft neck, tennis ball size, about 30 heads). The Nootka Rose will go up in the barn loft after drying in the sun today. I'll braid it in a few days for storage.

The Elephant garlic will either be roasted whole for spread on crackers or incorporated in salads/soups.

We still have 7 varieties of garlic to take up - some for braiding and some to add to spaghetti sauces, etc.

mutti
(we might have some cloves available for fall planting - if anyone is interested PM either ND or I)
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on June 19, 2009, 11:41:20 am
I can't eat garlic in any form, but I do use it for some medicinal things that are topical and for the dog. Do you have a variety of garlic that would be best suited to this purpose? All I've tried to grow is from the stuff one buys in the store and, once, some "elephant" type. None ever did very well. I know they need a rich soil, even more than onions, so that's probably the problem.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on June 19, 2009, 12:07:15 pm
I can't eat garlic in any form, but I do use it for some medicinal things that are topical and for the dog. Do you have a variety of garlic that would be best suited to this purpose? All I've tried to grow is from the stuff one buys in the store and, once, some "elephant" type. None ever did very well. I know they need a rich soil, even more than onions, so that's probably the problem.

ND and I will sit down tonight. We will go through and see what might be best. Our garlic grew in some "yucky" type soil - maybe it is a varietal thing. mutt
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on June 19, 2009, 01:13:23 pm
I've been perusing the almanacs very closely this year. I usually prefer the Blum's.  It unfortunately has been very right on this year. We are going to keep getting this wet weather the rest of the year and possibly the cold will get here earlier than usual,maybe even early snow. Our house is at about 3200 feet elevation, it may only rain in the piedmont and coastal areas.  I think in August the east coast will be threatened with 3-4 hurricanes. Our spring cropping was pretty much of a wash so to speak and it doesn't look too good for late summer. Soil doesn't have time to dry out to be able to work it before it rains again.

But I shall endeavor to persevere.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on June 19, 2009, 01:54:55 pm
Thanks, Mutti! That would be much appreciated.

I'm at about 4600 feet, in NE Wyoming. It's been unusually cool and rainy here too, but looks like we'll have some warmer and dryer weather before it gets cold again. 40 degree nights at the end of June is just so amazing for a gal from the So. Calif. desert.

Short season and cool. Must be all that global warming...
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on June 19, 2009, 05:34:28 pm
The weather around here is really wierd for this time of year. Normally you would have to water regularly, but there is so much rain that I have to pick things early to get them before they rot. I'm soooo pissed off. :angry4:
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Bear on June 19, 2009, 05:48:16 pm
Quote
I'm at about 4600 feet, in NE Wyoming. It's been unusually cool and rainy here too, but looks like we'll have some warmer and dryer weather before it gets cold again. 40 degree nights at the end of June is just so amazing for a gal from the So. Calif. desert.

6,700', on the edge of Basin-and-range country. Talk to me about short growing season! :D

The rain is nice, but it's been unusually cool. Many of the seeds we planted have not germinated yet.
We can't tell wether it's the weather or the seed. The starts we planted or doing fine.

Quote
Short season and cool. Must be all that global warming...

Can we keep the heat and get the water too? Please???

Bear
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on June 20, 2009, 10:40:45 pm
Thanks, Mutti! That would be much appreciated.

I'm at about 4600 feet, in NE Wyoming. It's been unusually cool and rainy here too, but looks like we'll have some warmer and dryer weather before it gets cold again. 40 degree nights at the end of June is just so amazing for a gal from the So. Calif. desert.

Short season and cool. Must be all that global warming...

ML - What ND and I will do is figure out which garlic has been most productive and send some of those off for fall planting in your area.

You can get garlic concentrate here: http://www.gemplers.com/search/garlic+barrier and use gel-caps to dose your critters. This is how a good friend doses his cattle, goats, sheep, pigs, horses and farm dogs. If you would like, I can try to get "accurate dosages" from him.

He lives in the northern most reaches of Wisconsin and for 30+ years has had to go this route vs growing his own.

mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Hollywoodgold on June 21, 2009, 08:00:30 am
Thanks, Mutti! That would be much appreciated.

I'm at about 4600 feet, in NE Wyoming. It's been unusually cool and rainy here too, but looks like we'll have some warmer and dryer weather before it gets cold again. 40 degree nights at the end of June is just so amazing for a gal from the So. Calif. desert.

Short season and cool. Must be all that global warming...

ML - What ND and I will do is figure out which garlic has been most productive and send some of those off for fall planting in your area.

You can get garlic concentrate here: http://www.gemplers.com/search/garlic+barrier and use gel-caps to dose your critters. This is how a good friend doses his cattle, goats, sheep, pigs, horses and farm dogs. If you would like, I can try to get "accurate dosages" from him.

He lives in the northern most reaches of Wisconsin and for 30+ years has had to go this route vs growing his own.

mutti

Mutti:

Garlic Barrier gives a discount if you are using it for sheep or goats. See there website and visit the "Garlic for Sheep" section.

http://www.garlicbarrier.com/


BR/DS
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: amagi on June 25, 2009, 01:02:00 am
My corn is finally taller than my beans.  Something has made the leaves of some of the bean's into lace. A bug I think.

 I think I'll break down and apply commercial fertilizer.  There just isn't much good in my soil and three years of compost hasn't produced enough.  I think there isn't enough nitrogen for the soil OR the compost.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on June 25, 2009, 02:49:13 am
My corn is finally taller than my beans.  Something has made the leaves of some of the bean's into lace. A bug I think.

 I think I'll break down and apply commercial fertilizer.  There just isn't much good in my soil and three years of compost hasn't produced enough.  I think there isn't enough nitrogen for the soil OR the compost.

Mushroom compost adds organic matter and trace elemens as well as the three main ones NPK
Green manure adds N
Wood Ash adds P & K
Then add charcoal to keep it there.
Also see these sites about "Terra Preta del Indio"
The first is the best, but they are all very good, and have different info.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ki3uTMYsg-8
http://terrapreta.bioenergylists.org/
http://www.biochar.org/joomla/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5JpvhaQjyyc

I used this stuff on my potatoes this year as an experiment, and they are healthier and bigger than ever.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Mr. Dare on June 25, 2009, 05:31:51 pm
My corn is finally taller than my beans.  Something has made the leaves of some of the bean's into lace. A bug I think.
   Our first year with beans it was Mexican bean beetles... They looked like yellow lady bugs, so we let them go. Their larva look like small yellow slugs, and will skeletonize the leaves if not dispatched with extreme prejudice. This year it has been Japanese Beetles that are attacking our beans. Just can't seem to kill them fast enough, but the Cherokee Trail of Tears beans are hardy growers, so even though they look a bit raggedy in places, they are still growing pretty well. Both bugs will eat the leaf like you describe, leaving the hard veins in a lacy looking pattern. I assume there are other possible culprits, but these are the one's we have experienced.
   The Japanese Beetles aren't hard to spot, but the Mexican Bean Beetles can be sneaky. They like the undersides of the leaves, they will lay their eggs there and leave. The larvae will hatch a week or so later and do the actual damage. They are easily squashed, and being soft bodied at that stage, most natural insect predators will eat them if they find them.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on June 26, 2009, 10:11:42 am
Quote
They looked like yellow lady bugs, so we let them go. Their larva look like small yellow slugs, and will skeletonize the leaves if not dispatched with

Did the same thing a few years back. Tried squishing all that I could find, but my beans were so thickly planted I couldn't get them all.  Too thick even for organic pesticide to do much good. I got beans but not much.  At the end of the season pulled up all the plants and burned them. didn't plant beans the next year.

My son and I were testing the electric fence surrounding our new garden area. During the process I was turning on and off the charger. Alas, I forgot to turn it back on and the goats found out. We were trying to grow an open-pollinated heirloom corn. Don't know how much has survived.  May replant with hickory king if none of the other looks like they will make.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on June 26, 2009, 10:37:03 am
Braided the Nootka Rose into 10 - 12 heads per string (Total 7). Took up the Iirridium Softneck (sp) and it will follow to the loft then braiding.

Elephant garlic is almost dry (clothes pinned it to the Blackberry Fence as it was too long to hang in the loft). 

Cut off the tops and layered next to the blackberries in hopes of driving off critter/bugs.

Melons are running like crazy and the winter squash which we fed to the livestock in the pasture over the winter has made a "volunteer" patch of 35' x 15' .  While they might not be edible for us - whatever volunteers will likely be harvested and fed back to critters.  None of the livestock enjoy the leaves, blooms or immature fruit.

Few more blue berries, currents, and blackberries. Next year will be the 2nd established year - something to look forward to.

mutti



Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Bear on June 26, 2009, 10:54:12 am
The potatoes are doing very, very well. Much better than last year.
The tomatoes are all in bloom and the bees are in the area.

The radio said it would be 90 today in Reno, so we can probably
expect 75 to 85 here. Things are beginning to get going in earnest!

Bear
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: debeez on June 26, 2009, 01:30:01 pm
Horribly hot here in Missouri...90s...ugh.

We have grapes! I tossed out some seeded grapes a couple of years ago into the compost and they spread along the fence and into the back SW corner. Very cool. They are tiny still, not sure if they will actually ripen or not. I think the grapes were from Brazil. Different growing time/climate?

Summer squash have been producing okay...anyone know what makes some of the little squash just shrivel up and die? I haven't added chemicals or even fertilizer for that matter, just water. It seems as if they should be more productive then they are.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: slidemansailor on June 26, 2009, 07:21:35 pm
My corn is finally taller than my beans.  Something has made the leaves of some of the bean's into lace. A bug I think.

 I think I'll break down and apply commercial fertilizer.  There just isn't much good in my soil and three years of compost hasn't produced enough.  I think there isn't enough nitrogen for the soil OR the compost.

I don't have the time or energy to explain in detail at the moment, but cal to findl or just go to the nearest rock quarries and get buckets-full or even a pickup-full of their "crusher fines" or the finest stuff they will sell you.  Rock dust is ideal for replenishing the trace minerals into your soil. With them, plants can resist pests on their own as they have done for a millennium. They don't sell this stuff, nor do they know what it is good for. To them it is a waste product that falls off the conveyor belts and clings to everything they own.

For you doubting Thomasses, try one bucket on half your struggling plants. You will be singing the praises next week.

Today we completed the installation of my first drip irrigation system. For many reasons it was the clear choice for my 24 vine mounds and nearby marigold row.  Mr. Sprinkler is way happy with the result.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: synchro on June 27, 2009, 08:23:29 am
I don't have the time or energy to explain in detail at the moment, but cal to findl or just go to the nearest rock quarries and get buckets-full or even a pickup-full of their "crusher fines" or the finest stuff they will sell you.  Rock dust is ideal for replenishing the trace minerals into your soil. With them, plants can resist pests on their own as they have done for a millennium. They don't sell this stuff, nor do they know what it is good for. To them it is a waste product that falls off the conveyor belts and clings to everything they own.

Not in the Southwest where they know that it is a prime ingredient for adobe.
Here it is at a premium.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: dogsledder54 on June 27, 2009, 10:44:46 pm
My zuchini has taken off recently. The plant has gotten about ten times its size when I planted it. If I remember correctly I should have zuchini in about a month, about the same time I should be getting my first tomatoes.  :thumbsup:
And today I planted some flowers, petunias, and some red ones, and some purple ones (not thistles), but I don't know the names of them.
I dug them up out in the country from the ditch near a cornfield. Also got a bucket of good farm dirt to plant them in.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Mr. Dare on June 28, 2009, 10:08:57 am
   The Dare garden is coming along nicely, first zucchini harvested, garlic is in, first beans, peas, and radishes. The big problem for us this year is the Japanese Beetles. They are into everything! I have even killed several that were eating the marigolds we planted  to discourage pests. WTF??
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on June 28, 2009, 02:59:46 pm
As far as I know, marigolds only discourage soft bodied pests.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on June 29, 2009, 09:00:05 am
Quote
The big problem for us this year is the Japanese Beetles

Haven't tried this but an organic grower would put some of the beetles in a blender with oil or water can't remember and then apply the grossnest to the plants.  Japanese beetles are more or less cyclic, if that's a word, they seem to be a big pest for a year then lessen. But maybe since I have various bug eaters they get the grubs. It's hard to tell.

Well the goats didn't totally wipe out our corn. We should be able to have enough to save the seed, which was the purpose of this year's crop. We've interplanted pumpkins instead of squash and are putting in the half-runners today. Finally could really use a little, emphasizing " little", rain or will have to run a hose line about 400 ft and about 100 feet in altitude to the gardens.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: knobster on July 01, 2009, 05:23:17 am
I was amazed to learn that broccoli will keep producing small flowerlets even after the main stalk is harvested.  With only two plants we have avoided buying broccoli from the grocery store for a month now!  I'm already taking notes for the next growing season.  One of our green peppers is the size of a baseball so soon we'll pick that one as well.  It sure is amazing how cool (and powerful) it is to grow your own food.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: NuclearDruid on July 01, 2009, 07:15:37 am
I was amazed to learn that broccoli will keep producing small flowerlets even after the main stalk is harvested.  With only two plants we have avoided buying broccoli from the grocery store for a month now!  I'm already taking notes for the next growing season.  One of our green peppers is the size of a baseball so soon we'll pick that one as well.  It sure is amazing how cool (and powerful) it is to grow your own food.

Open pollinated cultivars, unlike hybrids, are very good at side shoot production. We have had good luck with Waltham.

ND
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on July 01, 2009, 09:10:01 am
Quote
I was amazed to learn that broccoli will keep producing small flowerlets even after the main stalk

I have had cauliflower produce little shoots also, after the groundhogs ate the main head.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: slidemansailor on July 01, 2009, 11:41:36 am
I finally got the bed ready and the corn in. From Territorial Seed From I got one packet fo 80-90 day corn, one of 90-100 and one of 110-120 or something like that. Three 40-foot rows ought to give us corn from October 1 to November 1.

A field trial set up by my young daughters showed me that full pollination can happen in one long row that they planted when I was not paying attention.  So I'm really running against common knowledge with each of my three rows being of a differing maturity rate and variety.  I'll let you know how it comes out.

Many of the bell pepper plants have fruit on them. Same with the squash. Yippee. FRESH, healthy, full-flavored produce time.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on July 03, 2009, 03:49:29 pm
Test your soil before you add anything especially acid or alkaline. Know what the pH of your soil is for best results.

Still cool and very, very wet for a Wyoming July. It has rained off and on all day after raining all night. Lots of blooms on the tomatoes - but also millions of grasshoppers - all sizes and colors - to eat them and everything else (except the grass!!!!!). The iris bloomed and were shredded within hours. BUMMER

How can you grow ANYTHING with all these grasshoppers? Second year in a row.  :huh: :huh:
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Who...me? on July 03, 2009, 04:37:42 pm
Hhhhmmmmm...grasshoppers is good fish food. You ought to see if you can sell them online. Maybe a wholesale bait distributer. Get yourself a butterfly net and a bag and go to town.


Bag em, box em and ship em.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on July 03, 2009, 05:37:38 pm
Hhhhmmmmm...grasshoppers is good fish food. You ought to see if you can sell them online. Maybe a wholesale bait distributer. Get yourself a butterfly net and a bag and go to town.
Bag em, box em and ship em.

Might be an idea for local trade, but I highly doubt you could ship them anywhere, let alone alive! At least not until we live in a free country. :(

And when you and a crew of thousands got done scooping them up... there would still be several jillion left to eat the tomato flowers. I live on the edge of a vast prairie and the number of "hoppers" would rival the grains of sand in the sea, I'm afraid.

In the meantime, is anybody in the market for a box of grasshoppers? :)
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on July 03, 2009, 09:46:08 pm
Are they Kosher?
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on July 07, 2009, 11:42:42 am
More: Garlic, onions, some potatoes.

Now that the rain has slowed a bit the pole beans,sweet potatoes, squash, cucumbers and melons are improving.  Good amount of Green tomatoes, corn is beginning to tassel, peanuts are blooming and we may have cabbage soon!

We are behind about 6 weeks, but I think we will recover.

mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Bear on July 07, 2009, 12:27:35 pm
Our tomatoes are green and the size of ping-pong balls.
We've harvested some lettuce, carrots and a few onions.
Melons got a late start, but are up now.

Bear
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: knobster on July 08, 2009, 05:09:37 am
We just ate our first green pepper (last night actually).  We were a little too excited and picked it a tad early (strong pepper smell, slightly bitter taste) but my wife got a kick out of me holding it high and spouting, "by the grace of God, look what I helped create!"  I've saved the seeds so hopefully next season these will also produce.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on July 08, 2009, 09:58:53 am
I hate to discourage you, but seeds from an immature fruit are not going to be viable. If you want to save seed from that plant, allow another fruit to mature completely until it is soft. For most peppers, that usually means they turn red. Dry the seeds on a paper towel. I store the seeds in paper envelopes, just to avoid any mold. If you live in a moist environment, make sure the seeds are totally dry, then store in plastic bags.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on July 09, 2009, 07:29:13 am
Went up and checked on our seed corn, it might possibly make. Pumpkins are coming up. About time to do late planting. Did get a little rain, the soft kind that soaks in rather than run-off.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MsSage on July 09, 2009, 08:04:00 pm
I have a bunch of cotten seeds if anyone wants them. I know its too late for this year but not too early for next year.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: knobster on July 09, 2009, 10:08:19 pm
I hate to discourage you, but seeds from an immature fruit are not going to be viable. If you want to save seed from that plant, allow another fruit to mature completely until it is soft. For most peppers, that usually means they turn red. Dry the seeds on a paper towel. I store the seeds in paper envelopes, just to avoid any mold. If you live in a moist environment, make sure the seeds are totally dry, then store in plastic bags.

Not at all!  Comments, suggestions, pointing out my shortcomings, etc. are all welcome!  My two pepper plants are chock full of fruit now so it should be easy to let one of them mature as you stated above.  Thanks for the advice.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: padre29 on July 12, 2009, 10:37:58 am

Are Wasps a net plus for a garden?

i've gotten a wasp nest in the area of my garden and I do not know if I should exterminate them or if they keep harmful insect populations down.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on July 12, 2009, 03:17:42 pm
Quote
ve gotten a wasp nest in the area of my garden and I do not know if I should exterminate them or

 Do they seem to be aggressive toward you?  Bees are not the only stinging insects that help pollinate. I usually ignore them and we have wasp and hornets nest all over the place. Some of them prey on spiders and in turn spiders get them. If there is a chance that small children might get stung or someone is allergic to them, which can be deadly, My granddaddy died from a sting, then I would exterminate. I had to do that to a bald-face hornets nest once because it was so low to the ground I was afraid the grandkids might accidentlely get too close to it and piss off the hornets.


Question. How do youall grow your peppers. I know if the soil is too fertile you get beautiful tall plants with no fruit. Have done that. Lately my plants are super puny. Just can't seem to get a good balance.

Some of the varieties of tomatoes are doing pretty good and some aren't. Oxheart is really doing well. Planted some onion sets, maybe not too late hope they do better than last year. There are some really nice mullien plants growing at the top of the garden. Be nice to be able to pick and dry the leaves and soak the flowers in olive oil. It is the only herb that I have  found for ear aches other than garlic. Also picked a bouquet of black-eyed susans, daisies, queen annes lace and yarrow. Since the garden hasn't been mowed on the borders, I have my wild flowers again.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on July 12, 2009, 03:36:21 pm
Be sure to wear bee-keeper gear when you do the deed. I've always wanted to hit a hornet nest with a flamethrower.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on July 12, 2009, 10:24:59 pm
Quote
Be sure to wear bee-keeper gear when you do the deed.

Just do it in the dark time when they are all in or around the nest.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on July 12, 2009, 11:55:54 pm
Quote
Be sure to wear bee-keeper gear when you do the deed.

Just do it in the dark time when they are all in or around the nest.

Fire looks better at night too.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: kirgi07 on July 13, 2009, 12:10:47 am
Just nuke'em and be done with it. Ought 7.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: knobster on July 13, 2009, 04:33:41 am
Quote
Be sure to wear bee-keeper gear when you do the deed.

Just do it in the dark time when they are all in or around the nest.

Agreed.  I have a problem with wasps on my back deck.  With small children around I usually check for new nests every few days and spray in the early evening.  The wasps are lethargic and 'all at home' during this time.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Disavowed spook on July 13, 2009, 02:19:41 pm
Here's my gardens reprot;
Have teh tallest corn in the county.
Radishes went to seed mostly, didn't water enough I guess. Radish flowers are tastier than radishes anyways....
beets are plumping up nicely.
Garlic onions and spinach are happy.
green beans everyday....peas coming soon.
lettuces are going crazy.
Squash is going to explode. Cukes are too....
Sunflowers are lagging.
Tomatos are lagging too...
Lemon Verbena is spreading....good cause I like it in my suntea and spritzers...
Lemon clover is thin because I keep eating it.....


Oh, and the code enforcement officer just stopped by because they got a complaint aout someone "growing the wrong kind of plants".....so I walked around with him  labelling the plants as he fumed....showed him the trench my asshole prison guard neighbor has dug around his property on my property, the rose bush he has hacked 1/2 to death and explained that every year he makes the call about what I have going on over here....apparantly the code officer was aggravated that someone had teh gall to complain, waste gas on a tight budget, and generally use the municipality to screw with me...so the official edict fro the municipalities code enforcement officer is as follows;" Well, I can't see anythign wrong here, so whoever made the complaint is SOL, just keep your grass knocked down to under a foot tall"

"Well, i always do", I replied.
"sorry to bother you." The city says.
"not at all, come back when the corn's ready if ya want". I offered chucklingly albeit sincerely.


So, not only is my garden healthy, but is is no longer in official danger for yet another year...yeah,..I told the officer that the same guy next door that killed my cherry tree calls in a complaint every year.
I have a feeling that the officer is going to try to confirm who made teh complaint and probably find somethign to cite them for because he knew that every year I get a visit or two from the code division and i's pretty apparant that teh guy hacking my rosebush and digging a moat on my property is the dick around here....


The code enforcement officer was so pissed that he was called out here to harrass me unjustifiably he could barely contain himself...I felt bad for the guy....being used like a tool like that.....
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Disavowed spook on July 13, 2009, 02:23:28 pm
Also, one interesting plant related thing,....I have not seen a single honey bee all year.
All my plants are being pollenated by carpenter bees and other beetles but have not seen a single honey bee all year...checked my radiator and none even smashed in there on 3 cars.
I have a squadron of 4 carpenter bees that make the rounds 5x a day and am glad for them cause I didn't want to be pollenating my own crops...
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Disavowed spook on July 13, 2009, 02:29:44 pm

Are Wasps a net plus for a garden?

i've gotten a wasp nest in the area of my garden and I do not know if I should exterminate them or if they keep harmful insect populations down.
I'd say yes. They hunt worms, caterpillars, beetles, and other pests...I was just watching one hunt my green bean flowers for something....I suppose a victim , not pollen or nectar,....so, as far as I am concerned, predators colonizing your garden mena that there is ready prey for them.....

Im all organic gardening, so, all the ladybugs wasps, and sparrows are welcome to hunt in my veggie patches. the finches and sparows have totally erradicated any japanese beetles and benleaf beetles and whatever was nibbling on my radishes...and I chose to let the carpenter bees burrow holes in my trim so they could be close by as well...
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: dogsledder54 on July 13, 2009, 02:58:10 pm
Be sure to wear bee-keeper gear when you do the deed.
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v391/dogsledder54/bees.jpg)
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on July 13, 2009, 03:11:12 pm
Not what I meant.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: knobster on July 14, 2009, 04:45:10 am
Thank you very much Brick.  My sinus cavities are now filled with coffee...
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on July 24, 2009, 12:45:24 pm
Our special corn is still alive, but not dark green. Hubby went in search of whatever to give it a boost. It may be nitrogen deficient. Planted some half-dead onion sets about a week ago. amazinly they are coming up. Will feed the pumpkins this evening. Wish at least one tomato would turn red. We are probably going to have an early winter. Might have to try the pulling of the tomato plants and hang them in the root cellar.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on August 01, 2009, 01:59:35 pm
It is now time for those neighbors who forgot that "10 hills of Zucchini/Cucumbers should be just right"  really means they should have put in only 2 - 3 hills.

Around our little area rises the call "Yes, the wife is good. Yes, the livestock is fine.......so - you want some X?".  I've seen squash the size of baseball bats, cukes that are the length of my forearm, and everything in between.    This is the one time per year that people actually lock their car doors to prevent squash dumping  :laugh:. 

I look forward to this time of year.  I never say no. By sorting through what is given to us as well as what we grow, my biggest concern is where to find the time to get the stuff put up!

The livestock also eat well on leftovers.

We currently have 42 jars of pickles (Bread n' Butter, Dill chips, dill spears, and dilled squash spears) waiting to go out to storage from Thursday/Fridays haul. About 60#'s awaits my attention.

And the best "score"? A trash can and 2 5 gallon buckets of apples picked yesterday in return for 3 pints of apple butter and applesauce. She even returned my jars from last year!

If/when this slows down, if you see a crazy lady driving slowly down the road in an old blue and white Ford 150 scanning hedgerows/yards for unused food - it might be me!

mutti
(humming - its the most wonderful time of the year....while stirring applesauce)

Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on August 01, 2009, 02:17:53 pm
Neighbor brought us some crook neck. I wouldn't mind a couple of z's. I like to grate them and freeze them to use for zuchinni bread.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on August 01, 2009, 02:28:01 pm
You ladies are making me cry. Boo HOOO! Those who plant 8 hills too much of anything probably don't have any grasshoppers. The bugs ate all of my squash plants before they could get two leaves on...

Sure would love to have some neighbors with squash to give away. I could almost live on it. Summer squash is "on sale" here in the market for ONLY 99 cents a pound this week. Same as for cabbage regularly now. And carrots were a real bargain at 2 pounds for a dollar - usually 90 cents a pound too.

We are collecting materials for a greenhouse and hot beds. Maybe next spring I can do something with them. In the meantime, I just finished planting spinach in the window boxes I keep in the orchid room. I ate a little spinach at a time all winter last year, and have had a few leaves of swiss chard and lettuce all summer. Not much, but it's better than nothing. :)

Oh well... I envy you all.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: debeez on August 01, 2009, 04:32:36 pm
I am plotting, planning and building enough raised beds to cover a good portion of my back yard and other places. So far, five new 4x8s have been put together and are waiting, impatiently, for dirt to fill them. I figure I can get a green bean, carrot and potato harvest in before frost. Next year...oh how how I have plans for next year!

I sat down in front of my computer, modified the cells and rows in an Excel spreadsheet to show squares and plotted out my entire 1/3 acre with all planned raised beds. Then I thumbed through both of Louise Riotte's companion planting books and figured out what to plant where and with what other plants and ordered all of my seeds.

Grapes, peanuts & hyssop
Yellow squash & tansy
Eggplant and amaranth
Broccoli, onions & dill
Asparagus & basil
Cilantro, parsley & lettuce
Strawberries & bush beans
Tomatoes, bee balm & carrots
Corn, cabbage, dill & potatoes
Pan squash & collard greens
Pumpkins & corn
Snow peas & radishes
Peas and pickling cukes
Asparagus beans, cucumbers, & lettuce
Corn, zucchini & nasturtium
Sage and kale

Hell, maybe I'll start my own CSA!
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Nomads2 on August 02, 2009, 05:49:09 pm
Sorry if this has been mentioned before, but I just saw some info online about LED growlights.

http://www.fuzzlight.com/

They mention being able to grow e.g., tomatoes - year round, indoors.  They use far less electricity than standard lights, and create much less heat.  Seems they could really extend the growing season....
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Bear on August 02, 2009, 06:41:50 pm

I like LED lighting, but the word from the Experimental Ag station
at the local university is that LED grow lights are "not ready for prime time".
The guy I spoke to said that for some reason, all of the lights they tested
put out about half their rated UV output. He didn't know why, but it did
seem consistent, when compared to more traditional grow lights.

:dontknow:

Bear
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Nomads2 on August 02, 2009, 08:22:51 pm
That's helpful info, Bear - thanks.  I hope that they will be "ready for prime time" one day soon.  Will keep an eye on the technology.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Bear on August 02, 2009, 10:50:03 pm
Quote
That's helpful info, Bear - thanks.  I hope that they will be "ready for prime time" one day soon.  Will keep an eye on the technology.

You're welcome. Yeah, I'm hoping they get 'ready for prime time' real soon. They are so much more efficient
than most other technologies, that if we get to the point of being miserly with our power consumption, then
LED grow lights could make a big impact on how well we eat.

BTW, there is a new class of LEDs that are just hitting the market now called Organic Light Emitting Diodes. These
things are made of plastic - they aren't semiconductor chips. MUCH cheaper, capable of putting out a wide range
of colors (voltage controls color, amperage controls brightness) and they can be paper thin.

The downside? They burned out quickly, until recent breakthroughs made them reliable enough for high-end video
displays. The other downside to Organic LEDs is that they are only as efficient as flourescent bulbs. Big whoop.

We've installed some solid state LED lighting in our house, but not as widely as I'd like, because of the cost.

Bear
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: slidemansailor on August 02, 2009, 11:57:33 pm
I gave myself a 3-day holiday weekend. Went to the garden and got a pile of nagging projects done. The biggies were weed removal from border to border, a 35' fence on the front of my "salad garden" plot that holds the tomatoes up and is topped with sprinklers ... major breakthrough from the time-consumptive hand watering we've been doing.

Sometimes the hand-to-mouth sucks up all of your time, making progress difficult. Today I'm grinning because a couple of valves control all of my irrigation needs and I can move on to the next items on my endless list. Lest you think I'm complaining, I wouldn't trade my productive holidays for anybody's spending sprees.

Oh yeah, the first cantaloupe, watermelons and red bell peppers are about to come off the garden and 40' of pole beans are about to go from zero to sixty in a blink.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on August 03, 2009, 10:12:24 am
Quote
40' of pole beans are about to go from zero to sixty in a blink.

We are doing a trade system with our neighbor down the hill.  He came by with some squash, had too many to eat and too few to sell.  He said he wished he hadn't messed with growing anything.  Went out to look at the beans and they were doing great. Next day went to look at the beans and the deer had eaten them all down and had done some damage to the potatoes.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: dogsledder54 on August 05, 2009, 05:52:11 pm
Got some tomatoes but not ready to pick yet :wav:. And some zuchini probably ready by the weekend ! 
My first home-grown stuff !
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on August 05, 2009, 06:15:37 pm
Got some tomatoes but not ready to pick yet :wav:. And some zuchini probably ready by the weekend ! 
My first home-grown stuff !

Yea! Success at last! mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on August 05, 2009, 09:48:31 pm
I found out today, that my garden isn't the only dead one in the neighborhood. ALL of my neighbors' veggie gardens are dead too.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: slidemansailor on August 05, 2009, 11:54:11 pm
Got my first Sugar Baby watermellon yesterday... ambrosia (http://www.answers.com/topic/ambrosia).

The squash and cucumbers are keeping our 24-person staff in veggies. Tomatoes, bell peppers, melons and string beans are on the verge.  Irrigation is re-engineered successfully. Garden fence is installed and painted (don't ask ;) )  (okay, ask... it was ugly salvage wood right in front of our southern view)  I'm anxious to plant some salad and broccoli ... plus I understand from Territorial Seed (http://www.territorialseed.com/)'s newsletter that I need to get cracking on my winter garden.  Aaugh!  I don't have time.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Bear on August 06, 2009, 12:22:58 am
Quote
I found out today, that my garden isn't the only dead one in the neighborhood. ALL of my neighbors' veggie gardens are dead too.

?????!?!?!?!?!? WTF? Do you know what happened?

Bear
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: kirgi07 on August 06, 2009, 12:48:30 am
What Bear said.Kinda curious ain't it. Ought 7.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on August 06, 2009, 04:48:08 am
My landlord said that the weather is weird this year. We normally get about half as much rain as this.
My guess, the gardens all drowned. Temperature seems to be weird too. It's only in the high 60's at
night, and almost 100 in the day. It's been raining every few days since spring, so if it wasn't that they
drowned, then it was probably fungal.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: knobster on August 06, 2009, 05:58:13 am
My landlord said that the weather is weird this year.

I second that.  Here in Michigan we've had a very cool and tame summer.  The previous 4 years usually saw hot summers with a spectacular thunderstorm every week or so.  Not so much this year.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on August 06, 2009, 08:15:49 am
My landlord said that the weather is weird this year. We normally get about half as much rain as this.
My guess, the gardens all drowned. Temperature seems to be weird too. It's only in the high 60's at
night, and almost 100 in the day. It's been raining every few days since spring, so if it wasn't that they
drowned, then it was probably fungal.

Those temperatures sound actually ideal, but too much water will certainly do a number on a garden if you don't have it set up right. Sounds like you need to make tall planting rows, and deep ditches between them. If water stands in puddles in the garden after a rain, you need to do something to increase the drainage even more. Lots and lots of light, airy compost will help. See if you can find a source for something like peanut hulls, buckwheat hulls, stuff like that. Till lots of that into the soil to promote drainage and keep the oxygen level up. That will help reduce the fungus.

If your garden is in a low place where water collects, you may just need to move it altogether.

I have friends who garden in the WET part of Washington state, and this is the only way they can grow anything.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on August 06, 2009, 08:52:06 am
ND and I garden on a slope with as much tilled in organic matter as we can muster. Hopefully in a few years we will have less clay and more friable. mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on August 06, 2009, 10:23:58 am
Our main garden is on the side of the hill. But trying to do the same thing working in more matter. The soil is pretty heavy. Mostly letting the garden be fallow this year. We have swaths between sections to prevent erosion. Doing it has made it more tiered.

The new area on top of the hill is flat as a pancake.

All of our land needs a shot of rock phosphate.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on August 06, 2009, 02:06:21 pm
My landlord said that the weather is weird this year. We normally get about half as much rain as this.
My guess, the gardens all drowned. Temperature seems to be weird too. It's only in the high 60's at
night, and almost 100 in the day. It's been raining every few days since spring, so if it wasn't that they
drowned, then it was probably fungal.

Those temperatures sound actually ideal, but too much water will certainly do a number on a garden if you don't have it set up right. Sounds like you need to make tall planting rows, and deep ditches between them. If water stands in puddles in the garden after a rain, you need to do something to increase the drainage even more. Lots and lots of light, airy compost will help. See if you can find a source for something like peanut hulls, buckwheat hulls, stuff like that. Till lots of that into the soil to promote drainage and keep the oxygen level up. That will help reduce the fungus.

If your garden is in a low place where water collects, you may just need to move it altogether.

I have friends who garden in the WET part of Washington state, and this is the only way they can grow anything.


Well, we live in the Sand Hills Region of NC, which normally has drainage that is too good.
Last year I had to water every day because it drained away so fast. Despite frequent rain, we
have to plant drought resistant plants so that they will survive, normally. Though this year it would
have been better to plant rice, watercress, cranberries, and water chestnuts.

My garden is on high ground in my yard, not as high as the house though. I added charcoal this year to add
air and nutrient retention.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on August 11, 2009, 01:35:39 pm
Finally got some tomatoes ripe. Picked them before fully ripe cause of the slugs.  Ox-heart came on first.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Bear on August 11, 2009, 02:03:01 pm
Our tomatoes are just coming ripe right now. First ones are Early Girl,
the smaller, bunching, tomatoes are just a little further behind.

I don't think the melons are going to produce fruit soon enough
to have it ripen by first snow. That's because we planted from seed
on June 1st instead of starting them indoors.

Next year, everything we don't plan on buying as starts, gets started
as seed INDOORS on April 1st. This will give it about a month before
transplanting outdoors. (I'm allowing at least 3 weeks for germination.)

Bear
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: dogsledder54 on August 11, 2009, 08:17:29 pm
Here in nebraska it only got up to 90 ONCE in July, on the 30th or 31st. It has gotten up above 90 a few times in August and hit 100 one day.
I have 2 zuchinis almost ready to pick and some tomatoes but they are not ready.   ;-]
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on August 11, 2009, 09:20:00 pm
Today's low here was 95oF.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Canadian Mamma on August 12, 2009, 06:29:37 am
It has been raining almost everyday since May. 

We, all of Ontario in fact are having  a serious problem with Blight, A fungus that it is ILLLEGAL to spray for. A province wide pesticide/herbicide ban. 

All root vegies, taters, beets, onions, garlic you name gone, rotted in the ground. :BangHead: :angry4: :BangHead:

Note to self, go to USA this fall and smuggle stuff back for next years gardens. :ph34r:
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on August 12, 2009, 07:56:22 am
ND and I were talking about the garden status this morning. Green beens are finally doing better, lots of green tomatoes (but they are no ripening as well as they should), cukes are okay, the melons were doing alright (but then we had 2 100+ days and they decided to over ripen/rot overnight).

We still have growing season yet, however we won't be putting up as much as in the past.

mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: debeez on August 12, 2009, 10:33:48 am
Just finished espalier on one of our two pear trees. Will be interested to see how this turns out. I've never espaliered before!

Also realized, to my chagrin, that the 'tree' behind the composter that I had tried to cut out was actually a grapevine. Oops. Well, most of it is still there.

Transplanted black raspberries, sowed fall crop seeds and lots of kale throughout yard. Next year, things will be hopping, popping, and I'll be doing a LOT of canning. Plus running after chickens...my little version of paradise.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Hollywoodgold on August 12, 2009, 11:25:08 am
It has been raining almost everyday since May. 

We, all of Ontario in fact are having  a serious problem with Blight, A fungus that it is ILLLEGAL to spray for. A province wide pesticide/herbicide ban. 

All root vegies, taters, beets, onions, garlic you name gone, rotted in the ground. :BangHead: :angry4: :BangHead:

Note to self, go to USA this fall and smuggle stuff back for next years gardens. :ph34r:

Can you not even use "naturals" to fight such pathogens?
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Who...me? on August 12, 2009, 01:52:06 pm
Looked in the garden yesterday after having ignored it for some weeks. The weeds are doing great.  I also noticed that the tomatoe plants are all but falling over with all the fruit they are holding. Picked and gave away two 6 gal buckets full and have the counter covered for our own use.  The green peppers are doing great also.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on August 12, 2009, 02:16:37 pm
Looked in the garden yesterday after having ignored it for some weeks. The weeds are doing great.  I also noticed that the tomatoe plants are all but falling over with all the fruit they are holding. Picked and gave away two 6 gal buckets full and have the counter covered for our own use.  The green peppers are doing great also.

Camo for the garden - I like it  ^_^.  Hopefully you'll have a little bit of time for enjoying the produce. mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Zookeeper on August 12, 2009, 05:02:20 pm
I have tomatoes and zukes coming out of my ears. I love it! Thanks for the tips earlier this summer they worked. Mutti, Is it normal for the Hubbard Squash to droop when its really hot? Im keeping them well watered but they start sagging around 100+. Any suggestions?
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Bear on August 12, 2009, 06:48:07 pm
Quote
I have tomatoes and zukes coming out of my ears. I love it! Thanks for the tips earlier this summer they worked. Mutti, Is it normal for the Hubbard Squash to droop when its really hot? Im keeping them well watered but they start sagging around 100+. Any suggestions?

I'm not mutti, but sometimes plants droop because they are losing water faster than they can replace it.
You might try hanging shade cloth over the plants to keep them a little cooler on hot days. That would
reduce the water loss.

Bear
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: synchro on August 12, 2009, 09:14:37 pm
Squash snivel, pi** and moan, and shrivel at a moments notice.
Give them their ration of an evening, and to the greatest part,
ignore their plea.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Zookeeper on August 12, 2009, 11:07:07 pm
I was asking Mutti cause she answered some questions about Hubbard earlier in the year.  I think Ill try shading half of the plants and see how that goes, If it doesn't work Ill tell'um to stop sniveling an grow. The fires have started here and the smoke is really bad again it killed my plants I think last year. I walked out of my house and there were ashes floating in the air.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: synchro on August 13, 2009, 07:23:18 am
Sorry to jump in.
Also sorry to hear about the fires.
We have smoke in the air too.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on August 13, 2009, 09:06:16 am
I was asking Mutti cause she answered some questions about Hubbard earlier in the year.  I think Ill try shading half of the plants and see how that goes, If it doesn't work Ill tell'um to stop sniveling an grow. The fires have started here and the smoke is really bad again it killed my plants I think last year. I walked out of my house and there were ashes floating in the air.

Good morning!

There is nothing quite like walking out and having the squash appear to be giving up. The first thing I would do is look at the stems close to the ground. Do they look like this image (http://entomology.unl.edu/charts/sqvinbor.jpg)?  If they do, you'll want to bury every 8 - 12" the stem leading off from there with a good soil mixed with DE. In fact I would use damp soil if possible to ensure new rootlets could form.

If they are faking you out like a Southern Belle in a too tight corset ("Oh my!  It is so hot here!") - shading them can be helpful (which is why we try to plant among the corn stalks ) as well as giving them a drink early in the morning (try to avoid right before night as this might encourage various fungal diseases).

Right now with highs from high 80s to over 100F heat index, in the daytime our squash looks a bit pitiful.

Good luck and thanks to Bear/Synchro for their good ideas.

mutti

One way you might be able to tell if they are stressed - do you have anything else planted near them showing signs of stress (pepper leaves will feel limp, corn will begin to curl inward, etc.)?
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: NuclearDruid on August 13, 2009, 12:00:20 pm
Curcurbits are also susceptible to a number of wilts. They are spread to the plant by biting/sucking insects such as squash bugs and cucumber beetles (which you'll also find on squash and melons, and vice versa). If they tend not to perk up overnight then you probably have a wilt. Link to wilt pict (http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/IPM/images/cucurbit/diseases/fusarium-wilt/confused_fusarium-bacwilt_zoom.jpg)

ND
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: synchro on August 13, 2009, 08:18:47 pm
We have been hitting upper 90's with low humidity. 
My squash go through a daily cycle where during the heat of the day
they are limp as dishrags.  When the sun starts setting they recover even
without water but they really like a good root soaking.
12 hours later they are exhibiting peak vigor for the day.
Shade cloth might be an interesting experiment.
Good luck with recovery.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on August 14, 2009, 11:47:07 am
Quote
My squash go through a daily cycle where during the heat of the day
they are limp as dishrags.  When the sun starts setting they recover

I totally understand what the squash are going through.  The same thing happens to me.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Jebur27 on August 16, 2009, 09:22:02 am
Well, we have had the crappiest year ever.  We put out 15 tomato plants and have harvested less than 1/2 dozen tomatoes.  Fortunately, they were an Heirloom variety and we were able to save some of the seeds. 

I guess it's time to Google soil fortification/improvement.  I need to look at crop rotation, as well. 

Also, we need a better setup for vertical vine crops.  The first crop was sugar snap peas (which seemed to be doing well) & a branch fell on the rig, knocking it over, and they all died.  Then we put out cucumbers and this time it fell over during a storm.  Everything, again, died. 

Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: dogsledder54 on August 16, 2009, 09:28:33 am
I made zuchini lasagna this week with our home grown zukes. It was  delicious. Have more ready to pick soon. Still waiting for the tomatoes to get done.  :-)
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on August 16, 2009, 11:39:16 am
Quote
Well, we have had the crappiest year ever.  We put out 15 tomato plants and have harvested less than 1/2 dozen tomatoes.  Fortunately, they were an Heirloom variety and we were able to save some of the seeds.

I guess it's time to Google soil fortification/improvement.  I need to look at crop rotation, as well.

Also, we need a better setup for vertical vine crops.  The first crop was sugar snap peas (which seemed to be doing well) & a branch fell on the rig, knocking it over, and they all died.  Then we put out cucumbers and this time it fell over during a storm.  Everything, again, died.

 What are you using for supports?  If you can get steel fence posts and cattle panels for next year.  Very stout and very reusable.

Our tomatoes are ripening, picked oxheart first and now roma's and some sort of just round red one, couldn't find the little thing with name on it.


Just checked for hurricanes for the atlantic basin. My almanac was off about two weeks.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on August 21, 2009, 09:29:32 am
Today looks to be corn day. Our weather is very strange (ND noted the Goldenrod blooming - it's about 4 weeks early for that) and the raccoon(s) have found the corn.

For those of you who have not "frozen" corn before, here is a (Photo warning)  link (http://www.wikihow.com/Freeze-Corn) to help with that.

I especially like the suggestion under #7.  :thumbsup: for a ingenuity!

mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on August 21, 2009, 10:48:01 am
Planting cucumbers in between the rows will deter coons.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on August 21, 2009, 11:55:36 am
Picked a few tomatoes yesterday.  There was a great big green one half-eaten by a groundhog.  Win some  lose some.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on August 21, 2009, 01:06:11 pm
Planting cucumbers in between the rows will deter coons.

Apparently not.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Mr. Dare on August 21, 2009, 05:54:44 pm
   Our heirloom corn tasseled early with the stalks only three to four feet high. The corn we harvested was tasty, but very small ears, and not very many at that. The garden did not like the heat this year any more than I did. Most stuff was scrawny and leggy with poor production. A few things may make a late season rally when the heat breaks (if it lives that long). We usually don't see a hard frost till after Thanksgiving here.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Bear on August 21, 2009, 06:28:23 pm
Some of my Cascade hop vines have flower buds! (happy dance)

Bear
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: NuclearDruid on August 21, 2009, 06:52:40 pm
   Our heirloom corn tasseled early with the stalks only three to four feet high. The corn we harvested was tasty, but very small ears, and not very many at that. The garden did not like the heat this year any more than I did. Most stuff was scrawny and leggy with poor production. A few things may make a late season rally when the heat breaks (if it lives that long). We usually don't see a hard frost till after Thanksgiving here.

I hope that wasn't the Double Red that I sent with you. Ours wasn't as tall this year either however the ear size was fine. The Early June wasn't though the stalks were much taller this year with multiple ears per stalk.

ND
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Mr. Dare on August 21, 2009, 08:06:05 pm
   Yes, sadly that was one of them. We still (I think) have some seed left, and we are hoping tho get some viable seed from the harvest we got. I can't blame the corn, I think it was the weather.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on August 21, 2009, 11:24:15 pm
Due to all my crops failing, I'm looking into Sorghum and Buckwheat as possible crops for next year.

Here's what I'm thinking about:
Plants:
Cotton:
http://www.southernexposure.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Category_Code=COTT

Daikon:
http://www.southernexposure.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=28201&Category_Code=RADI
Grains:
Buckwheat
http://www.johnnyseeds.com/catalog/product.aspx?category=289&subcategory=290&scommand=page&qstateid=c19642b6-7d1c-4274-a3ee-13273650a96c&sp=2&item=966G
Oats
http://www.johnnyseeds.com/catalog/product.aspx?category=289&subcategory=290&scommand=page&qstateid=b9c8bd5b-011f-4f84-89ee-5adb6900b4f3&sp=2&item=967G
Corn
http://www.johnnyseeds.com/catalog/product.aspx?category=1&subcategory=390&item=312
http://www.johnnyseeds.com/catalog/product.aspx?category=1&subcategory=390&item=307
http://www.johnnyseeds.com/catalog/product.aspx?category=1&subcategory=19&scommand=refine&qstateid=1e20924b-16b8-498d-a4a4-f0dd60f7445b&rbc=categorystring&rbv=Vegetables%3a+Corn%3a+Old-Fashioned+Sweet&item=289G
SORGHUM
http://www.southernexposure.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=72608F&Category_Code=SORG

Tools etc..
http://www.johnnyseeds.com/catalog/product.aspx?category=292&subcategory=301&scommand=page&qstateid=06f22106-12dc-437f-9516-da21b599d06d&sp=3&item=9540
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on August 22, 2009, 10:07:23 am
   Yes, sadly that was one of them. We still (I think) have some seed left, and we are hoping tho get some viable seed from the harvest we got. I can't blame the corn, I think it was the weather.

As ND said, our Double Red did not do well at all (short at 4 - 5') this year. I also think it was the weather.

Now the Honey June was 8 - 10' and some stalks had 3 - 5 ears.  The ears also had little ears contained within the main one that I salt pickled last night. (Think Baby Corn size).

Another reason for us all to experiment with different varieties and plant multiple varieties if possible.

Yesterday: Pulled cukes from main garden due to wilt. The plants in the front are still producing well.

mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on August 22, 2009, 09:03:19 pm
Goats got in to garden ate my tomatoes. Got to get more panels up. Some of my fence you can almost walk through it is so rusty.  The field fence at the bottom needs more steel stakes for support.  But am hoping to panel all around.  But on the bright side found some zukes growing, guess my son had planted them after I told him not too. On the not so bright side got to get in the garden and pull all the squash plants up. Will either burn them or put in plastic bag. Squash bugs all over. On the bright side it has been raining and ground is soft so easy to pull.

I think we may get some seeds from our mr. roberts white corn.  Maybe not as much as would have hoped for but before all this rain managed to get some of it side-dressed.  Plan to plant oats on both gardens this fall think that is all we can afford.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on August 23, 2009, 10:36:24 am
crepemyrtle - Sorry to hear about the attack of the "plant killer goats" - I'd hope they get indigestion, however then you would have to treat them.

Also - Oats. I know they have to be hulled: have you done that and does it require special skills/equipment?

ND and Minions (they have advanced from kidlets  :rolleyes:) raided the Druids Grove of Concord Grapes this morning. About 1/3rd 5 gallon bucket of de-stemmed grapes await the jelly making process.

Yesterday was our first tomato sauce day. Made 12 pints thick sauce with enough left over to simmer through the day for dinner.

ND and eldest Minion (sorry - just sounds cool to this old gamer) put in Cauliflower and Broccoli (about 36 plants), sprinkled in some rutabagas (not too late ya'll), and pulled up the last of the double red corn for seed.

Thinned lettuce, putting in Peas today (one can always hope), and cheese to make.

Anyone know where the Bon Bons went?   :thumbsup:

mutti
(I have heard tell that Late Blight is hitting commercial potatoes pretty hard. Caught a snippet on the radio which stated that production is expected to fall 52%. While I have not been able to locate it in print - might be time to look around for alternate starch sources.)

Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on August 23, 2009, 09:40:57 pm
Quote
Also - Oats. I know they have to be hulled: have you done that and does it require special skills/equipment?

Don't know much about harvesting oats, just want them for a cover crop this year maybe just turn them under.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on August 24, 2009, 12:21:51 am
Quote
Also - Oats. I know they have to be hulled: have you done that and does it require special skills/equipment?

Don't know much about harvesting oats, just want them for a cover crop this year maybe just turn them under.
Edited to add:

Mutti,
Get hull-less oats. Just winnow and then do whatever you do to your oats. Chopping them up or rolling them makes oatmeal,
grinding them makes oat flour which I use to make hard tack, but you could use to make your breads have a chewier texture.

http://www.johnnyseeds.com/catalog/product.aspx?category=289&subcategory=290&scommand=page&qstateid=b9c8bd5b-011f-4f84-89ee-5adb6900b4f3&sp=2&item=967G
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: knobster on August 24, 2009, 05:46:34 am
My green peppers are still going strong as well as the broccoli.  Our salads are much tastier this season!  The strawberries did not do well, a handful of berries in June, half a handful in July and they are now just a nice viney, tangly mess of greenery.  I think next year we will try peas instead.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on August 24, 2009, 06:54:28 am
Quote
The strawberries did not do well, a handful of berries in June, half a handful in July and they are now just a nice viney, tangly mess of greenery.  I think next year we will try peas instead.

check out this link before doing anything else to your strawberry plants. you just need to straighten it out.


http://gardening.about.com/od/fruitsberriesnuts/a/Strawberries.htm

Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Bear on August 24, 2009, 10:51:06 am
Some critter got into our northside raised beds and ate the strawberries!!!!
It passed up the lettuce, beets, carrots and chard.

Bear
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Jebur27 on August 24, 2009, 05:20:14 pm
Some critter got into our northside raised beds and ate the strawberries!!!!
It passed up the lettuce, beets, carrots and chard.

Bear


Well, dang, given the choice, so would I. 

Where did you say those strawberries were located, again? 
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: coloradohermit on August 25, 2009, 08:11:27 pm
It's been a cool and damp summer here. So far there's tomatos galore but none ripening.  We've had a couple of zuchini, and a few servings of beans.  What has done really well is the cabbage family stuff. Lots of cabbages, lots of broccoli, lots of cauliflower and some really nice kohlrabis.  I didn't plant much this year, mostly experimental to see what grows well and where.  Don't know if we'll ever get ripe tomatos since first frost could be less than 2 weeks away. All was started in the greenhouse but the cool summer really got them off to slow growth once they went outside.  Lessons learned for next year.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on August 25, 2009, 08:17:31 pm
If all goes as is planned, then next year's garden will be in Western Oregon.
Anything I need to know?
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on August 25, 2009, 10:34:33 pm
Quote
Don't know if we'll ever get ripe tomatos since first frost could be less than 2 weeks away.

Try pulling the whole plant root and all and hang up in a root cellar or equivalent. Also can be individually wrapped in newsprint and kept to ripen. take out of the wrap a few at a time. Keep cool but not cold.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: synchro on August 26, 2009, 07:15:49 am
In my part of the Southwest at 6700ft, if you can get past the first freeze -
there is usually an extended growing season.  (But not last year)
Think floating row cover - I can find links if you need.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: coloradohermit on August 26, 2009, 08:25:44 am
Quote
Don't know if we'll ever get ripe tomatos since first frost could be less than 2 weeks away.

Try pulling the whole plant root and all and hang up in a root cellar or equivalent. Also can be individually wrapped in newsprint and kept to ripen. take out of the wrap a few at a time. Keep cool but not cold.
Thanks for the info!  For a few weeks after first frost, days will still be pretty warm so I have blankets to cover them at night then let them get warm sun during the day. After that will use your tip.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on August 26, 2009, 11:41:14 am
Does anyone know about garden barges for floating on freshwater lakes?
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: NuclearDruid on August 26, 2009, 03:33:20 pm
Quote
Don't know if we'll ever get ripe tomatos since first frost could be less than 2 weeks away.

Try pulling the whole plant root and all and hang up in a root cellar or equivalent. Also can be individually wrapped in newsprint and kept to ripen. take out of the wrap a few at a time. Keep cool but not cold.

We did the pulling trick with both peppers and tomatoes. Hung them up in an unheated barn. It worked like a charm.

ND
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: slidemansailor on August 27, 2009, 10:28:29 am
We overwintered a jalapeno pepper plant one year... some nut transplanted it into a pot and gave it to me with a paintbrush for pollinating the flowers. With a comfy location in our south-facing window, it happily gave us peppers through the winter.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on August 28, 2009, 11:51:45 am
So for those of you who don't know - I (in my infinate wisdom  :rolleyes:) decided that in order to make the metal electric fence posts around the garden more visable I would place empty soda cans and those big plastic cups upside down on the top..

May I now, in my humble realization that it was not a good idea, suggest that other gardeners not do this?

The case against this process comes from the throbbing wasp stings on my elbow and ankle.  While out picking some beautiful tomatoes, I apparently bumped a cup. This had the effect of upsetting the residents who decided that I was intending to attack them. 

Bad news? It hurts.
Good news? Minions are well trained to run without question when the "mommy voice" commands it.

I'm going back in folks - after ND rides up on the white horse this evening to slay the evil doers!

mutti
(who seems to be having one of those weeks. Steer in excitement squished my foot resulting in loss of toe nail, I burned my cheese (resulting in happy dogs eating 6 gallons worth of curds) and now this. Sigh - the challenges of gulching)

Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Mad Wet Hen on August 28, 2009, 12:01:10 pm
Sorry to hear you are having such a bad week. Hope things get better soon.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on August 28, 2009, 12:55:17 pm
Sorry to hear you are having such a bad week. Hope things get better soon.

Thanks. I think that if I acknowledge my failures/mistakes that things will improve.

mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on August 28, 2009, 05:24:50 pm
Does anyone know about garden barges for floating on freshwater lakes?

Do you think a raft with a container or square foot garden would work?
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on August 29, 2009, 09:46:58 am
Quote
So for those of you who don't know - I (in my infinate wisdom  rolleyes) decided that in order to make the metal electric fence posts around the garden more visable I would place empty soda cans and those big plastic cups upside down on the top..

How about using high-visibility yellow spray paint next year?

I am thinking about letting my goats in the garden. They pretty much destroyed the tomato plants and as usual my peppers didn't do jack-squat. I might put some pepper  in pots and use a paint brush as stated above.

Mutti, Do you think goats eat rhubarb. I don't remember them messing with the plants we had at the old place. I'll start working on the fence around it now instead of waiting to the last minute. Then will be able to test its weakness by not letting the goats in for awhile.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: coloradohermit on August 29, 2009, 09:56:07 am
Mutti, Do you think goats eat rhubarb.
I'm not Mutti, obviously, but I personally never found anything that my goats wouldn't eat, including cactus and yucca.  I tried landscaping with stuff I thought they wouldn't eat like little mugo pines and spikey barberry and stinky geranium and marigold, but all was devoured.  Hope you have better luck than I did.  :BangHead:
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on August 29, 2009, 10:23:10 am
Crepemyrtle:

Quote
So for those of you who don't know - I (in my infinate wisdom  rolleyes) decided that in order to make the metal electric fence posts around the garden more visable I would place empty soda cans and those big plastic cups upside down on the top..

How about using high-visibility yellow spray paint next year?
Quote

Much better idea! My concern was the kidlets running and poking their eyes out - then again - maybe I worry too much!


Quote
Mutti, Do you think goats eat rhubarb. I don't remember them messing with the plants we had at the old place. I'll start working on the fence around it now instead of waiting to the last minute. Then will be able to test its weakness by not letting the goats in for awhile.

Mine do. However it is important to remove the big leaves at the end due to the Salicylic Acid  (http://www.rhubarbinfo.com/rhubarb-poison.html)- the same reason humans don't eat it.

Quote
During World War I rhubarb leaves were recommended as a substitute for other veggies that the war made unavailable. Apparently there were cases of acute poisoning and even some deaths. Some animals, including goats and swine, have also been poisoned by ingesting the leaves. 21,37

True - one would have to eat a bunch - but I don't know how much rhubarb you have. Have you considered putting the Rhubarb up as Conserve (http://www.rhubarbinfo.com/recipe-jam.html)? Or are you past the point of that much available?

Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Hollywoodgold on August 29, 2009, 10:50:19 am

Quote
Mutti, Do you think goats eat rhubarb. I don't remember them messing with the plants we had at the old place. I'll start working on the fence around it now instead of waiting to the last minute. Then will be able to test its weakness by not letting the goats in for awhile.

Mine do. However it is important to remove the big leaves at the end due to the Salicylic Acid  (http://www.rhubarbinfo.com/rhubarb-poison.html)- the same reason humans don't eat it.

Quote
During World War I rhubarb leaves were recommended as a substitute for other veggies that the war made unavailable. Apparently there were cases of acute poisoning and even some deaths. Some animals, including goats and swine, have also been poisoned by ingesting the leaves. 21,37

True - one would have to eat a bunch - but I don't know how much rhubarb you have. Have you considered putting the Rhubarb up as Conserve (http://www.rhubarbinfo.com/recipe-jam.html)? Or are you past the point of that much available?
Quote

Memories:

About 55 years ago, I lived in a newly settled urban extension of a major northern City. There were a number of farm houses that remained in the fabric of the city. Across the street, such a home remained. I remember one day crawling, sneaking, into the farmer's garden in the prairie behind the house and laying on my back watching the cloud formations and eating rhubarb. I must have eaten ten stalks of it looking at the figures in the clouds. Animals, people, faces could be seen if you watched long enough. Now I realize I was stealing but it didn't seem that way at the time.

Didn't even get a stomach ache. Guess I was lucky.

Just dreaming.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on August 29, 2009, 11:15:06 am
I'll take the leaves off, personally have not adapted a taste for the stuff. We used to have some that would have the flower spike over ten feet. It is just one of the first things i got to start a perennial vegetable garden. And thought it might be sellable eventually.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on August 29, 2009, 02:37:47 pm
Hollywoodgold - Thanks for sharing the memory. It is not the stalks that are the issue, it is the leaves where the Salicylic Acid is concentrated.  The problem during the WWII era was .gov was encouraging the eating of the leaves.

mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: dogsledder54 on August 29, 2009, 03:35:12 pm
I'm enjoying the best tomatoes I've ever had.  ;-]   and zuchini too. Yum. Next year, much more !
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on September 01, 2009, 10:04:06 pm
Went to the upper garden where we planted some heirloom corn. I think we will be able to salvage enough seed to get a goodly amount for next year. One of the stalks has 4 ears and a couple looked like they have three ears most just had two.  will separate the corn seeds accordingly. Just re-read the description and it says usually has one or two large ears per stalk. The 4 ear one must be a mutant, could turn out really to be a boon.

Anyone have corn with 4 ears?
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on September 03, 2009, 10:58:09 am
The tomatoes seem to be recovering a bit. Most prolific are the Pink Eggs (about the size of a turkey egg. pointy on one end and rounded on the other). They are what I would call "semi-dense" and cook down reasonably well into sauce. The yellow eggs are the next prolific. Cherry tomatoes are iffy this year. Stuffers are doing well and we are enjoying them filled with either egg salad or tuna.

I guesstimate that we are harvesting about 60# every 3 days. Not as much as last year (about 100# per 3 days), however it will be enough for thick sauce for ourselves and to share with others. I think I will have to  skip making ketchup this year.

Picked about 5# of green beans. We'll eat half steamed for dinner and I will blanch the others for freezer storage.

A few peppers, the turnips are starting to bulb up, eating some kale, the rutabegas don't seem to be doing anything yet and the peas decided to sprout!

My favorite part of the garden time was watching the minions feed the cows the tomatoes that were ones that had fallen and were not useful. When the critters see us picking produce they charge across their little field and wait at the fence for snacks.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: slidemansailor on September 03, 2009, 10:55:32 pm
We harvested melons, cantaloupe, squash, cucumbers, beans, corn, tomatoes, peppers.  It inspired a photo. 

Stuff that I grew so well in coastal cool hardly works at all. What I couldn't grow is outstanding here.  I can hardly believe how good the melons and cantaloupe is.

We also canned some of the mountain of string beans... and worked more on the chicken coop.  Tomorrow morning we will be going from 6 young birds to about 20 with some laying and no more than 5 of any one variety.


(http://idaholiberty.com/wp-content/gallery/pictures/hornicopia.gif)
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: kirgi07 on September 04, 2009, 12:15:38 am
How hard was that trombone ta grow?.  :mellow: .Ought 7.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on September 04, 2009, 06:18:52 am
Are those artichokes right by the beauteous peppers? What a great photo! mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: slidemansailor on September 04, 2009, 09:10:26 am
Thanks. The picture has been in my head for a long time. I tried to do it with Photoshop once, but wasn't satisfied. I was pretty danged tickled that yesterday's harvest did it for me.

Yep, artichokes. I had wonderful luck with them in coastal cool. Here they are reminiscent of a cross between a dirt clod and a tree branch.  But they look good in the picture.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on September 04, 2009, 09:16:56 am
Quote
I can hardly believe how good the melons and cantaloupe is.

The melons and cantaloupes are quite impressive.

I grew one cantaloupe years ago, it was one day from harvest and my great dane ate it.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: slidemansailor on September 04, 2009, 09:20:43 am
Quote
I can hardly believe how good the melons and cantaloupe is.

The melons and cantaloupes are quite impressive.

I grew one cantaloupe years ago, it was one day from harvest and my great dane ate it.

That's a bit fruity for a dog.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on September 04, 2009, 11:39:55 am
Quote
I grew one cantaloupe years ago, it was one day from harvest and my great dane ate it.[/quote

Quote
That's a bit fruity for a dog.

Had a cat that loved tomatoes, it took me a while before I realized it wasn't giant slugs. She also tried to grab a cantaloupe off the kitchen counter. She just couldn't get a bite on it.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Mad Wet Hen on September 04, 2009, 12:03:48 pm
I know a Doberman that loved tomatoes and pineapples.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on September 04, 2009, 12:04:03 pm
Had a cat that loved tomatoes, it took me a while before I realized it wasn't giant slugs. She also tried to grab a cantaloupe off the kitchen counter. She just couldn't get a bite on it.
Quote

I believe your cat has been reincarnated in our doggie Sasha. When the ripe tomatoes start disappearing from 18" down - we know who the culprit is. She prefers red tomatoes and leaves the rest alone.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on September 05, 2009, 01:29:12 pm
Just finished processing the tomatoes into BBQ sauce and ND found a 25# box of "second" Pluots for $6 (there were a few nectarines thrown in). 

8 pints BBQ and 12 pints Pluot conserve up. Have 10 qts of sliced peaches "soaking"  now for Peach conserve tomorrow (w corriander/thinly sliced ginger). That should make about 6 qts of finished product.  I am so looking forward to making the holiday baskets for others this year!!

NDs off to trade for more peaches (4 types garlic, 2 types onions and goat summer sausage) - the difference in FRNs for another 25# of peaches. They usually throw in some Seconds as well. Seconds from this orchard are not "defective" they are the ones that cannot fit through the sorting table.  Trying to decide whether I should make more conserve or chutney.

And hopefully the peas will be happy with the rain. I am looking forward to fresh peas as our spring ones never made it.

Tomorrow tomatoes, beans, broccoli and squash to pick.

mutti


Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: slidemansailor on September 10, 2009, 11:05:20 pm
The first BIG tomato finally ripened ... with several waiting in the wings. 
Mrs. Sailor is canning like there's NO food in the store TOMORROW. 

(http://idaholiberty.com/wp-content/gallery/pictures/tomatoes-9_10_9-reduced.gif)

I'm lucky, proud and inspired to do those things I do well. Chicken facilities are improving ... slower than I think they should, but at a higher quality level than any practical man would build 'em.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on September 10, 2009, 11:25:12 pm
Beautiful tomatoes sailor.  Ours are gone ended up with blossom end rot. Not a good year for tomatoes, weather too cool. Just hoping the heirloom corn makes so can get some seed. Really tempted to pick some for roasting ears but won't.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on September 11, 2009, 02:05:21 am
Rhubarb can also be made into wine, I read it in BHM。
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on September 11, 2009, 07:49:07 am
SlidemanSailor - Very nice!  Are the smaller ones "4th of July"? And what variety is the larger? How is the Mrs. putting them up?

I am getting ready to pick this morning as well and I hope ours look as nice.

mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: slidemansailor on September 11, 2009, 07:53:11 pm
SlidemanSailor - Very nice!  Are the smaller ones "4th of July"? And what variety is the larger? How is the Mrs. putting them up?

I am getting ready to pick this morning as well and I hope ours look as nice.

mutti

Don't worry about appearances ... it's all trick photography ... and Photoshop.

Mrs. Sailor is water-bath canning the tomatoes.  We are promising ourselves to do more creative things when it makes more sense to heat the house by making tomato sauces and such... like when there isn't so dang much to do in the garden and we are wearing thermals and sweaters in our 60-degree house.

Varieties ... uh several that looked good on paper... I fear the data is lost .. along with darn near everything but my weight and waste size.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on September 11, 2009, 09:39:40 pm
Don't worry about appearances ... it's all trick photography ... and Photoshop.
Mrs. Sailor is water-bath canning the tomatoes.  We are promising ourselves to do more creative things when it makes more sense to heat the house by making tomato sauces and such... like when there isn't so dang much to do in the garden and we are wearing thermals and sweaters in our 60-degree house.
Varieties ... uh several that looked good on paper... I fear the data is lost .. along with darn near everything but my weight and waste size.

We have had those years as well.

One thing that saves my sanity sometimes is to toss the tomatoes in the freezer if I have space from the first picking. Then the second picking I will have enough to make a "big batch". 2 x 24 quart "stock pots" will cook down to a manageble 20 pints of sauce or so after the food mill process. Also - the skins slip right off if you toss them in a sink of warm water.

Sounds like you have a great process going and in January it will be much appreciated.

mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: bull on September 11, 2009, 11:21:09 pm
beautiful tomatoes, ours ,are at their end,the corn wasn't very good this year either.
i through corn husk and all in an extra freezer ,latter i run it under worm water to husk and clean.
then right in the fryer , fry it let it stand and fry again and real butter.
i sure don't miss the old pressure cooker. stillhave 3 or4 but water bath is the way to go.
rhubarb wine has a habit of giving you a nasty hangover. in one of the fox fire books ,an old timer was always trying some thing new
with the last jar in each Bach, sugar, salt,spices ?
i new an old guy who hid a salt shaker in the garden, under a coffee can form his wife, just couldn't Waite.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: chutzpah on September 12, 2009, 08:25:19 am
There is nothing finer than a warm homegrown tomatoe off the vine! We had a bumper crop this year as well. I ate one everyday when they were overflowing the picking basket. Nothing better than a tomatoe sandwich!
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on September 12, 2009, 09:30:24 am
There is nothing finer than a warm homegrown tomatoe off the vine! We had a bumper crop this year as well. I ate one everyday when they were overflowing the picking basket. Nothing better than a tomatoe sandwich!

What about Fried Green Tomatoes? Or Cat-Head and 'Maters? Or Beef Carpaccio with Sliced Brandywine Tomatoes and E.V.O.O.?
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on September 12, 2009, 03:37:28 pm
Quote
Nothing better than a tomatoe sandwich!

Yes there is...............................two tomato sandwiches
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on September 12, 2009, 05:10:32 pm
Quote
Nothing better than a tomatoe sandwich!

Yes there is...............................two tomato sandwiches

Oh yea! With Beef Bacon no less - guess what we had for lunch  :rolleyes:
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Mad Wet Hen on September 12, 2009, 06:31:48 pm
Tomato sandwiches are great but, so are potato sandwiches.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on September 12, 2009, 11:13:42 pm
Quote
Tomato sandwiches are great but, so are potato sandwiches.

we eat raw potatoes with salt.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on September 13, 2009, 12:15:39 am
Quote
Tomato sandwiches are great but, so are potato sandwiches.

we eat raw potatoes with salt.

We use Lawry's Seasoning Salt on ours. Great-Grandpa started it when Granma was just a kid.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Who...me? on September 13, 2009, 01:32:23 am
I always liked tomato n onion samiches
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on September 13, 2009, 01:25:16 pm
Quote
I always liked tomato n onion samiches

Other than just a basic tomato and mayo sandwich, I like tomato, peanut butter. onions and mustard. Hmmmmmmmmmmmm good. Always grosses out my hubby.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on September 13, 2009, 03:53:19 pm
Or peanut butter and dill relish - yum!
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Mad Wet Hen on September 13, 2009, 05:26:38 pm
Oh well, I like chocolate chip cookies and Kosher dill pickles. Yum Yum.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Clip Johnson on September 13, 2009, 05:38:02 pm
This is starting to remind me of "Hee Haw" when everyone would ask "Hey Grand Pa, what's for supper?" He sure could rattle off some pretty wild stuff sometimes.

crepemyrtle357,
Not that there's anything wrong with it, as I'm sure it must be a wonderful concoction, but where in the world did you first get the idea to mix tomato, peanut butter, onions, and mustard?
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on September 13, 2009, 06:03:37 pm
I like sincronizadas with 4 kinds of cheese, spinach, chicken, tomatoes, and a serrano and tomatillo salsa.
I dip it in plain goat's milk yogurt or a similar dipping.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Mr. Dare on September 13, 2009, 06:26:35 pm
   Finally figured out what was going wrong with our potatoes today. Dug the big tater bed as planned, and was (like last year) only finding a few small ones. Mostly golf ball size, with a few tennis ball size ones to urge me to continue. I finally found a few lunkers, like in the almost "one pound Texas steak house all you can eat baker" size potatoes, and damned if the moles hadn't been at them and hollowed them out! I knew we had them, but I never thought they were cleaning us out like that.. Anybody have any good mole solutions? These don't have tunnels you can see on the surface, so I don't think the "spike traps" with the pressure trigger are going to work. Once I got into the bigger taters, the tunnels were everywhere, but you had to dig to find them. Crafty devils.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on September 13, 2009, 06:37:31 pm
   Finally figured out what was going wrong with our potatoes today. Dug the big tater bed as planned, and was (like last year) only finding a few small ones. Mostly golf ball size, with a few tennis ball size ones to urge me to continue. I finally found a few lunkers, like in the almost "one pound Texas steak house all you can eat baker" size potatoes, and damned if the moles hadn't been at them and hollowed them out! I knew we had them, but I never thought they were cleaning us out like that.. Anybody have any good mole solutions? These don't have tunnels you can see on the surface, so I don't think the "spike traps" with the pressure trigger are going to work. Once I got into the bigger taters, the tunnels were everywhere, but you had to dig to find them. Crafty devils.

I have cooked up a plot this-morning to git rid of our mole issue.
I made my own anti-mole-hot-pepper-and-pyrodex-charge-to-burn-the-little-bastards-out-smoke-round-for-muzzle-loading-derringers.
I hope the AMHPAPCTBTLBOSRFMLD works. If it does the job, I'll post the recipe.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: slidemansailor on September 13, 2009, 08:56:44 pm
.. Anybody have any good mole solutions?

Know your enemy first.  They sound rather more like gophers than moles. 

Moles tunnel just under the surface primarily eating grubs, insects, worms and such. Their tunnels are so shallow they leave a ridge wherever they go.

Gophers dig deeper living primarily on roots and plants they pull into their tunnels.

Some gopher getters are great trappers. They have favorite traps, techniques and plenty of perseverance.  Turns out I don't have one or more of those.

Some gopher getters are employers.  X dollars per gopher tail to some budding entrepreneurial trapper.  I never had that opportunity.

Some are gassers.  Commercial pellets that turn the tunnel into a gas chamber or a flexible pipe from your old Dodge Power Wagon into the tunnel or variations on that theme.

Some are flooders.  Run the hose into the tunnels ... no gills on those critters.

Grandma Nelson used to sit in the middle of her Christmas tree farm with a .410 and her knitting. That kept the gopher problem manageable for her.

Some declare war.  As I kid I once promised my dad I could get his gophers if he bought the dynamite, battery and solenoid. Lucky for me he didn't.  There are some guys in my current neck of the woods who cater to the "blow the SOB's up" mentality, filling the tunnels with explosive gas then igniting it.  That's gotta be a good show.

Some gopher getters insert poisoned grain into the main tunnels.  That's been my gig. A tablespoonfull in every main tunnel seems to make the problem go away. Naysayers fear the dead guys will arise out of the tunnel to be consumed by a bird or mammal who will die from the residual poison.  I've never heard of that happening in the real world.

In my current location, they add a fee to our property taxes to pay others for poison bait applications in gopher tunnels. I figure if I hired them, I might as well employ them. Besides, I have somehow lost my Wilco Gopher Bait Applicator (http://wilcodistributors.com/ag_products.htm), which is the really cool tool for the job.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Canadian Mamma on September 13, 2009, 09:07:51 pm
May I be so bold as to give the following as a manual on the How to Not take care of your gopher problem?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3lYm0c7gYyU&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=etpHKueh6S0
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on September 14, 2009, 08:16:48 am
Quote
crepemyrtle357,
Not that there's anything wrong with it, as I'm sure it must be a wonderful concoction, but where in the world did you first get the idea to mix tomato, peanut butter, onions, and mustard?

I got the peanut butter and mustard sandwich from my mothers family and I just embellished it. Peanut butter is my main staple food.  If it weren't for my husband liking meat I probably would go pretty much without it. Except for lamb maybe deer.

I like rough grub ( mash taters, pinto beans, cornbread) which turns out to be a complete protein.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Mr. Dare on September 14, 2009, 05:23:14 pm
Quote
Know your enemy first.  They sound rather more like gophers than moles.

Moles tunnel just under the surface primarily eating grubs, insects, worms and such. Their tunnels are so shallow they leave a ridge wherever they go.

Gophers dig deeper living primarily on roots and plants they pull into their tunnels.
   Slideman, good info for sure. I always thought gophers were larger than these tunnels, but I could be wrong. They are small enough that a golf ball would be a tight fit. The diet sounds like gophers though. We do have moles in the yard with shallow tunnels, so I thought that's what these were (since I thought gophers were bigger). Glad to know I was right about what moles generally eat. we had been leaving them alone because I didn't think they bothered root crops. Guess I was giving them a bum rap after all.
   I'll have to look into gopher solutions some more. Bombs are out. It would sure be fun to blow them to hades and back, but it would scatter my garden... :rolleyes: Poison is out too because of the afore mentioned risk to other above ground animals. We have outdoor cats and dogs we are rather fond of. Thanks for the heads up on gophers. I sense a re-run of "Caddy Shack" coming on... :laugh:
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: bull on September 14, 2009, 05:48:04 pm
Mr.Dare i use peanut butter on a victor gopher trap woodstream am corp. lititz Pa.  Model 0610 only have one,
thats all you need. tie 550 cord to it and stake above ground,place a board over hole.just looked through 5 diffrent
trapping catalogues haven't found one yet ,there around 5 dollars
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on September 14, 2009, 05:54:32 pm
Quote
Mr.Dare i use peanut butter on a victor gopher trap woodstream am corp. lititz Pa.  Model 0610 only have one,
thats all you need. tie 550 cord to it and stake above ground,place a board over hole.just looked through 5 diffrent
trapping catalogues haven't found one yet ,there around 5 dollars

found some listed on ebay

probably can find them at farm stores also
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Mr. Dare on September 14, 2009, 06:06:59 pm
   Thanks all! Some research has indicated that it probably isn't gophers, they are indeed much larger than the tunnels we have, and there is no above ground opening such as gophers make. Looks like the culprit may be VOLES. They use mole tunnels and like root crops (and will venture above ground occasionally for stems and other stuff). Peanut butter baited mouse traps are the best solution I've seen so far, but it's a rough solution since they recommend putting them in the tunnels, which are deucedly hard to locate until harvest time. Then it's only time to survey the damages.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Rarick on September 14, 2009, 07:12:47 pm
Raise your potato beds.  Stakes and a bunch of 2x8's, before you put the dirt back in the bed put down a bunch of gravel mixed with the right kind of poison and dirt, throw a plastic tarp over it and back fill your topsoil.  Make other similar beds for your other root crops, and you shouldn't have problems.

I still like the exhaust from the truck or tractor if you can find a tunnel, CO/CO2 is generally heavier than air so you suffocate them. Get a CO2 cylinder and you can do the same thing without using a bunch of gas.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on September 14, 2009, 08:04:13 pm
Fill them with propane and ignite.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: John Q on September 14, 2009, 11:35:44 pm
When I was a kid my uncle was complaining on a July 4th BBQ about the gophers in his back yard.  Dad took a gas can and put about 1 gal down the freshest open gopher hole,  Next he took my aunt's Electrolux vacume and put the hose on the back so it would blow air out and into the gopher hole. while it was running he went around the yard covering up all the open holes. Then he removed the hose and threw a lit match in the hole.  BOOM!  smoke came up all over the yard. End of gopher problem.  My aunt ran out of the house yelling at my dad about trying to blow the house off the foundation!  She got even madder when my uncle and dad started laughing at her .  Us kids thought it was cool!                           
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on September 14, 2009, 11:56:27 pm
Quote
When I was a kid my uncle was complaining on a July 4th BBQ about the gophers in his back yard.  Dad took a gas can and put about 1 gal down the freshest open gopher hole,  Next he took my aunt's Electrolux vacume and put the hose on the back so it would blow air out and into the gopher hole. while it was running he went around the yard covering up all the open holes. Then he removed the hose and threw a lit match in the hole.  BOOM!  smoke came up all over the yard. End of gopher problem.  My aunt ran out of the house yelling at my dad about trying to blow the house off the foundation!  She got even madder when my uncle and dad started laughing at her .  Us kids thought it was coo

 :wav: :wave: :sign10:
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: chutzpah on September 22, 2009, 08:08:33 pm
When I was a kid my uncle was complaining on a July 4th BBQ about the gophers in his back yard.  Dad took a gas can and put about 1 gal down the freshest open gopher hole,  Next he took my aunt's Electrolux vacume and put the hose on the back so it would blow air out and into the gopher hole. while it was running he went around the yard covering up all the open holes. Then he removed the hose and threw a lit match in the hole.  BOOM!  smoke came up all over the yard. End of gopher problem.  My aunt ran out of the house yelling at my dad about trying to blow the house off the foundation!  She got even madder when my uncle and dad started laughing at her .  Us kids thought it was cool!                           

I laughed myself out of my chair on this one!
Still laughing!
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: bull on September 22, 2009, 08:22:50 pm
blew up my first building around 8 years old, the family never i mean never lets you forget.
i did find the traps 4.95 + shipping. there just a cool little trap to have around, would work great under the seat of
a truck.??? suprise
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: synchro on September 22, 2009, 10:03:00 pm
The End.
Last night we hit 30deg or less.
Even under cover, the garden largely yielded.
Tomatoes - DONE
Winter Squash - DONE
Summer Squash - Mostly Done
Chilis - Mostly Done
Eggplant - DONE
Carrots - OK
Chard- OK
Indian Corn - As Planned
The house is now FULL of underripe produce waiting foar a miracle.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: bull on September 22, 2009, 10:25:18 pm
the funny thing is my wife just hit  (the end ) of her rope. 11 months that damn watermelon has been in the kitchen, an just what are you going to do with it ?  HA. 11 months i guess were eating it tomarrow. 1 more day. I sprayed it with coilidle silver to see
how long it would last. then it was a challenge to see how long she would put up with it. cant blame a guy for trying.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on September 23, 2009, 03:51:54 am
The End.
Last night we hit 30deg or less.
Even under cover, the garden largely yielded.
Tomatoes - DONE
Winter Squash - DONE
Summer Squash - Mostly Done
Chilis - Mostly Done
Eggplant - DONE
Carrots - OK
Chard- OK
Indian Corn - As Planned
The house is now FULL of underripe produce waiting foar a miracle.

Here it is still quite hot and rainy.
Also, My crops failed months ago.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on September 23, 2009, 07:33:06 am
The End.
Last night we hit 30deg or less.
Even under cover, the garden largely yielded.
Tomatoes - DONE
Winter Squash - DONE
Summer Squash - Mostly Done
Chilis - Mostly Done
Eggplant - DONE
Carrots - OK
Chard- OK
Indian Corn - As Planned
The house is now FULL of underripe produce waiting foar a miracle.

Well - if a miracle doesn't happen, why not make a pickle of the ones which are firm (green tomatoes, squash perhaps) and not bruised?  Do you have a crock? Or one gallon glass jars? It is not necessary, but I do have instructions if you need them.

I thought our green beans were done for, but when I went out yesterday they had done a Mark Twain.

I know the end is within 4 - 5 weeks for most of our stuff (frost). The turnips and rutabegas should hold.

I really admire those of you who grow in such short seasons.

mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on September 23, 2009, 10:16:41 am
Still hoping our corn will make at least enough to get seed to use next year. Maybe this coming spring won't be as wet and cool and can put it in earlier. So far, knock on wood, the deer and raccoons haven't gotten it.  Keep checking to see if the silks have dried.  Wonder if you could pull the whole plant roots and all and hang it to finish? kinda of like tomatoes.

I think the place where we had bought the seed before had crop failure last year, so didn't have any to order.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Bear on September 23, 2009, 10:52:40 am
Our tomatoes finally came in, and we have more than we know what to do with. :)

The La Ratte potatoes are tasty, but I'm leaving the rest in the ground until the
last minute, just to get as much growth as I can. Same with the onions and carrots.

The sunflowers are blooming and likely to finish before snow fall.

The squash is producing, and we're likely to get some small melons too. The
peas and snap beans have been real producers.

All in all, I'd say it's been a good summer. Next year will be better with more planning.

Bear
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on September 23, 2009, 11:04:25 am
Quote
the funny thing is my wife just hit  (the end ) of her rope. 11 months that damn watermelon has been in the kitchen, an just what are you going to do with it ?  HA. 11 months i guess were eating it tomarrow. 1 more day. I sprayed it with coilidle silver to see
how long it would last. then it was a challenge to see how long she would put up with it. cant blame a guy for trying.


Have you cut it yet? Really interested in the experiment.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on September 23, 2009, 02:42:40 pm
Quote
the funny thing is my wife just hit  (the end ) of her rope. 11 months that damn watermelon has been in the kitchen, an just what are you going to do with it ?  HA. 11 months i guess were eating it tomarrow. 1 more day. I sprayed it with coilidle silver to see
how long it would last. then it was a challenge to see how long she would put up with it. cant blame a guy for trying.


Have you cut it yet? Really interested in the experiment.

Yeah bull, you might be on to something here.
Preserving fresh fruits far beyond the usual time it takes them to rot is a note worthy accomplishment.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: bull on September 23, 2009, 03:53:13 pm
didn't cut it yet ,told her tomarrow , HA one more day.
Ive done this with bananas ,spray one clump ,and put the other on a plate to see, you still have rip bananas that have been sprayed
and a plate of guw. i make my own coilidle silver so ,i can afford to spray under the tomato's, or on mold ,kills stink
spray work boots , veggies, trash cans  its just water with silver suspended in it. detonate? hell the new sent killer for deer hunting has silver in it there making socks and underware with silver in the material.
I WILL CUT IT TOMARROW.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on September 23, 2009, 05:13:11 pm
Quote
i make my own coilidle silver so ,i can afford to spray under the tomato's, or on mold ,kills

I make my own also but never thought of using on vegies or fruits. Makes sense. Very useful stuff.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on September 26, 2009, 10:28:19 am
Bull you cut that watermelon yet?

I kept butternut squash a long time on a shelfabout 6 months, the outside looked and felt perfect the insides were another matter.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: slidemansailor on September 26, 2009, 12:00:19 pm
Planted enough for friends and family. Tomatoes, salad, peppers, beans, corn, melons, cucumbers and squash enough for 6 families... but we are feeling overwhelmed just harvesting and putting a little bit by. Everybody I GIVE the harvested fruit to accepts with gratitude, but nobody helps harvest. 

What kind of people struggle to make ends meet yet turn down free food if they have to get it off the plant?

Patience, Grasshopper.  Next year they will happily do darn near anything for a little food.

So I expect I'll overplant even more next year.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on September 26, 2009, 12:09:17 pm
Quote
Planted enough for friends and family. Tomatoes, salad, peppers, beans, corn, melons, cucumbers and squash enough for 6 families... but we are feeling overwhelmed just harvesting and putting a little bit by. Everybody I GIVE the harvested fruit to accepts with gratitude, but nobody helps harvest.

What kind of people struggle to make ends meet yet turn down free food if they have to get it off the plant?

Patience, Grasshopper.  Next year they will happily do darn near anything for a little food.

So I expect I'll overplant even more next year.

If not, compost it.

or give it to a food bank and take a tax deduction or just consider it a tithe.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Clip Johnson on September 26, 2009, 12:12:49 pm
Planted enough for friends and family. Tomatoes, salad, peppers, beans, corn, melons, cucumbers and squash enough for 6 families... but we are feeling overwhelmed just harvesting and putting a little bit by. Everybody I GIVE the harvested fruit to accepts with gratitude, but nobody helps harvest. 

What kind of people struggle to make ends meet yet turn down free food if they have to get it off the plant?

Patience, Grasshopper.  Next year they will happily do darn near anything for a little food.

So I expect I'll overplant even more next year.

I know how you feel Slidemansailor, I know how you feel. The past three years I have also over planted and give away a lot of produce. It's not that I don't mind, but it certainly is odd that absolutely no one is even slightly interested in providing any assistance whatsoever. Although they are struggling to make ends meet. Fact is they are too busy watching the darn TV. Pretty sad actually.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on September 26, 2009, 01:13:21 pm
Planted enough for friends and family. Tomatoes, salad, peppers, beans, corn, melons, cucumbers and squash enough for 6 families... but we are feeling overwhelmed just harvesting and putting a little bit by. Everybody I GIVE the harvested fruit to accepts with gratitude, but nobody helps harvest. 
What kind of people struggle to make ends meet yet turn down free food if they have to get it off the plant?

Answer: my Parents.
I had a small veggie plot growing up, and they refused to eat the produce because I got it from outside.
Some people are just stupid like that. I wonder where they think the stores get their veggies? I think if
they knew that potatoes grew underground, they wouldn't eat them.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: bull on September 26, 2009, 02:23:46 pm
11 month old watermelon.
crepemyrtle357 ,you had it right perfect out side and absorbed inside, Rhine was sweet an could have been made in to pickles.
but give me credit 11 months in the kitchen and thats as far as she let me get away with that.i do try on her patents.
still have sweet potato's in the ground and some carrots yet.
GD i am never surprised how dumb people are , most don't know what there food is ,let a lone where it comes from.
mountain oysters don't come from mountain streams. hamburger is call  that because beef had little fat 80 years a go, not corn feed
back then and the local butchers added 10%  pork fat so it could be cooked with out burning.
 fountion of little know or cared about facts ,sorry
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on September 26, 2009, 02:24:40 pm
Another thing to consider for any squash, melon or cucumber vines that seem to wilt too easily... vine borers. A light infestation might allow the vines to recover when watered, but eventually the vines will be destroyed and die. Just look for a hole in the vine, usually with some "sawdust" type goop on the edges and maybe on the ground. The vine distal to the borer will be the most wilted, of course.

An insect might be visible inside the vine and you can spear it (kill it) with a needle without damaging the vine. Cover the damaged vine and surrounding area with soil as previously suggested and water. It may very well root and continue to mature the fruit on the peripheral.

If you find any vine borers, destroy vines by burning as soon as you can. After harvest, ALL vines should be gathered and burned rather than added to compost so as many of the eggs as possible can be eliminated.

[Edit: I was reading a section about squash plants wilting... and now I can't find it! Didn't think I was so far behind reading this thread. sigh]
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: bull on September 26, 2009, 02:38:10 pm
it not a good idea to compost vines or tomato clippings .ML' s right on that ,theirs a couple of other things to not compost??
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on September 26, 2009, 02:59:00 pm
That depends on how you compost, actually. If it gets hot enough, most things will compost safely.  I had a chipper/shredder to reduce the stalks and stems to a more or less uniform size which vastly speeds decomposition and ensures that it all gets hot enough to kill most insects and diseases. I just don't take chances with things like vine borers myself, since they can be devastating.

Most of my garden waste was actually fed to cows, horses and goats - with softer stuff given to the poultry, of course. I never fed tomato plants, though, since they can be a problem for livestock. Safer to compost that.

The only things absolutely not to put in a compost pile are meat scraps and raw bones. These attract ants and varmints, neither of which do your compost any good. The bones do not decompose well unless ground up. Dried and crushed bones would be ok, I think. Just never tried it.

Dried blood meal can be added to speed up the composting process, but unless you produce your own the cost is prohibitive.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: slidemansailor on September 26, 2009, 07:25:16 pm
I compost everything that nature provided.  Had a shot-up buck die in my yard once. My compost heap ate every last bit... he completely disappeared in 6 months... or at least I never found him.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on September 26, 2009, 07:37:48 pm
I compost newspaper all the time, it takes about 9 months to decompose.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on September 26, 2009, 11:37:22 pm
My composting is just throwing bunches of stuff in a pile and let the earthworms feast. They really like cardboard boxes.  Then I have the worm castings great potting soil.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on October 02, 2009, 09:48:33 am
Cut some of my corn stalks with real good ears on with dried up silks.  Put them in the living room to dry. I don't think it can take much more rain some of the stalks are getting mushy.  I think we will have enough for planting next year but none for meal. Didn't want to shock in the field, too many mice, rabbits and the like, they would eat the ears. Pretty good variety of corn, it didn't lodge too bad with all the wind we had this past week.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on October 05, 2009, 07:57:25 am
Well, the 2009 garden in Newcastle, Wyoming is history. The tomato plants were black and wilted yesterday morning, so it really froze Saturday night. The interesting thing is that they had survived a light snowstorm a few days before. I have about a gallon of small, green tomatoes picked on Friday, and will try to ripen them.

Better luck next year! But these plants seem to be the most cold tolerant tomatoes I've ever known. I'll give seeds to anyone who'll send me a SASE. Just PM.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Bear on October 05, 2009, 10:18:19 am
Everything is harvested except the sunflowers and the potatoes. I'm not
sure the sunflower seeds matured enough to be useful, but we'll see.
The garden is cleaned up, and only lacks top coat of manure.

Well, that and the 4 yards of top soil I need to order to extend the
garden to the East a little further. :)

I'd say that this year was  qualified success, and we have a number
of things to do differently next year.

Bear

PS: I also pruned some pine trees to reduce the shadows on the
North side of the garden. More useful space for next year.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: slidemansailor on October 06, 2009, 12:18:51 pm
The bottom line ... got a bit dried, frozen, cooked and canned.  Not enough, of course, but more than a little.

(http://idaholiberty.com/wp-content/gallery/pictures/preserving-small_0.jpg)

Oh yeah, there is still that40-foot strip I planted of mixed greens ... a variety of lettuce seeds with some broccoli thrown into my row seeder a month or so ago. They lettuce is ready to eat any time now and the broccoli plants are getting big.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on October 07, 2009, 02:42:14 pm
We dug up some more sweet potatoes (avoiding the Centipedes). I don't think we will have much to share this year - just not enough to get us through the winter.

After 2 1/2 hours there is still about 20 sq feet left, but my giddy up and go just  got up and left.

The sweet peas have a handful of peas left and I snitched an unripe pod to taste. I truly hope we get a few soon to eat.

mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on October 13, 2009, 11:59:26 pm
Cut the rest of the corn and have it all over the living room. The guy who farms with us had his bush-hog on the tractor, real b--tch to put  on, so just went and harvested. Still got some in the suburban will get it out in morning......maybe. Suppose to rain again, so just as well got it up. Maybe some flurries in a couple of days.

Time to buy a new almanac and start working on next years crop. Just all depends on our getting enough seed from this corn. Be nice to have enough to grind, but not holding my breath.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on October 14, 2009, 06:45:23 am
crepemyrtle357, just a suggestion... when your corn is dry enough to shell, do a germination test on a handful of the seeds. If they are not mature enough to sprout, then you'll know you can grind it all and try again next year.

Just a thought. :)
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on October 14, 2009, 09:30:50 am
Quote
crepemyrtle357, just a suggestion... when your corn is dry enough to shell, do a germination test on a handful of the seeds. If they are not mature enough to sprout, then you'll know you can grind it all and try again next year.

Just a thought. Smiley

Good idea, ML. Thanks.

Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Clip Johnson on October 14, 2009, 09:41:04 am
We dug up some more sweet potatoes (avoiding the Centipedes). I don't think we will have much to share this year - just not enough to get us through the winter.

After 2 1/2 hours there is still about 20 sq feet left, but my giddy up and go just  got up and left.

mutti

Too bad you're not anywhere close to NC, for there are literally acres upon acres of sweet potatoes grown (particularly the south-central and eastern part of the state), and after the farmers have gotten what they can out of their fields, most every one of them will allow anyone, who cares to, to go out in their fields and pick up off the ground all that they want. And the taters sure are some nice ones, not to mention reasonably priced, which is FREE!!! Being from the W Tenn and W KY area, I have never seen anything of the sorts before.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on October 14, 2009, 09:48:41 am
Too bad you're not anywhere close to NC, for there are literally acres upon acres of sweet potatoes grown (particularly the south-central and eastern part of the state), and after the farmers have gotten what they can out of their fields, most every one of them will allow anyone, who cares to, to go out in their fields and pick up off the ground all that they want. And the taters sure are some nice ones, not to mention reasonably priced, which is FREE!!! Being from the W Tenn and W KY area, I have never seen anything of the sorts before.

You guys are killing me! I just paid $.89 a pound for some butt ugly sweet potatoes. Hadn't had any in a while. They are usually much more expensive - and in worse shape! AGGGGG
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Clip Johnson on October 14, 2009, 09:56:15 am
If I weren't so darn sick today, and with it raining out, I would go out and get you a few bushel baskets ML.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on October 14, 2009, 10:06:43 am
Too bad you're not anywhere close to NC, for there are literally acres upon acres of sweet potatoes grown (particularly the south-central and eastern part of the state), and after the farmers have gotten what they can out of their fields, most every one of them will allow anyone, who cares to, to go out in their fields and pick up off the ground all that they want. And the taters sure are some nice ones, not to mention reasonably priced, which is FREE!!! Being from the W Tenn and W KY area, I have never seen anything of the sorts before.
You guys are killing me! I just paid $.89 a pound for some butt ugly sweet potatoes. Hadn't had any in a while. They are usually much more expensive - and in worse shape! AGGGGG

We may have pears, sweet potatoes, etc - but ML you have something we don't have there - right? Antelope, Open Carry, ?
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on October 14, 2009, 10:28:55 am
Hubby bought a 50 lb bag of taters for $12 and about 10 lbs of sweet taters for 6. A woman grew them here in the NC mtns. Hard to do. aint very pretty for sure.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on October 14, 2009, 10:58:23 am
We may have pears, sweet potatoes, etc - but ML you have something we don't have there - right? Antelope, Open Carry, ?

This is true. The antelope are very tasty. :)  Just really glad I'm not a vegetarian!
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Rarick on October 15, 2009, 06:12:18 am
Apple tree I talked the condo HOA into tranplanting bore fruit!  (It skipped last year) People are freaking out, every one is going to get something like a new "green" style shopping bag full of fresh fruit.   I may have made a few people think a bit too.......

One of our retirees made some apple pies for a snack during the HOA meeting where the bags are going to be passed out.  I think I may get to meet a few of the "quieter" owners.


Oh! Incidentally, we had a few break-ins of some of the foreclosed/ vacant units.  A little thought showed ther may has been an informer.  I left some CCW and Gunsite, and other such pamphlets laying about.  No name they were just laying in the lounge and pool areas "blown in by the breeze" so to speak.  Haven't had a break-in for 3 months and counting........
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on October 16, 2009, 06:41:06 pm
I fertilized around my potatoes and cabbage and sage and will soon cover them for the fall season.

My fertilizer was a biochar, wood ash, manure, and straw mix that I let sit for a week to rot the rest of the way before applying it on top of the straw mulch.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Who...me? on October 16, 2009, 06:52:22 pm
I just spread 80# of mushroom soil on my garden so it can steep over the winter and into the spring.  Just down the road in Lancaster Co. is one of the largest mushroom producers in the country so it is cheap as, well crap, here.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on October 31, 2009, 09:43:30 am
Cauliflower is just now coming in and broccoli is soon to follow. At $2.99 per crown, we are sure happy to put our $ in our own reserves!

mutti
(It's sauerkraut season again. Do you know where your cabbages are?  ^_^)
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on October 31, 2009, 10:16:01 am
(It's sauerkraut season again. Do you know where your cabbages are?  ^_^)

In my soup! I just got wonderful, fresh cabbage for 29 cents a pound. It's some of the best tasting cabbage I've ever had... and I LOVE cabbage. I can now get carrots for 45 cents a pound as well... at least for a while. They are grown somewhere in the state here, and much better than what I'd been getting for 90 cents a pound before. Things may be looking up!! :)
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on October 31, 2009, 11:21:25 pm
Don't get yer hopes up.

I just had some cabbage fried up with a dash of tamari shoyu, mayonnaise, and some katsuoboshi.
It was a side to go with my purple rice and seared tuna steaks.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on November 01, 2009, 08:48:31 am
'kraut is working. 225# of cabbage translated into: 1 12 gallon crock, 1 10 gallon crock, and a 4 gallon container made with caraway seed as a holiday gift for good friends. That left about 15#s to eat and 10#'s as give away to neighbors looking for fresh cabbage.

In about 4 - 6 weeks it'll be time to can.

We had fresh cauliflower, baby carrots and purple broccoli (all steamed) with tamales for dinner last night. Looks like the cauliflower will be coming in over the next month or so. We'll eat some fresh and I may pickle some for later.  Turnips are doing well (both first and second plantings).

This is the first year we have grown rutabagas - anyone know from first hand experience when they get roots?

mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on November 01, 2009, 09:12:35 am
This is the first year we have grown rutabagas - anyone know from first hand experience when they get roots?

They are rather slow deveoping, but the average is between 90 and 120 days. Even though they are closely related to turnips, they do not grow as fast. Keep the soil evenly moist for best flavor. They get very pungent if allowed to get dry.

I used to put the seed in as a late crop (end of October) and leave them in over the winter. I usually could harvest some by early February (depending on how cold it got), and the rest first thing in the spring (March/early April). They never were very big... but that's because they need a fairly rich, loamy soil.

Don't know if it would work for you. They are a cool season crop. I've heard that they have a much better flavor if left in the ground until after frost... mine were always grown that way. We did have frost in the desert, just not the killing ground freezing kind. But I've dug them out from under the snow too.

To store them, allow the top to wilt and then cut it off, leaving a good stub. Do not cut the roots off. That's how they get hard and woody in the store.They simply bleed to death, just like a beet would.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on November 01, 2009, 10:41:43 am
Thank ML -

We put in the rutabagas at the same time as the early turnips (August 15th). The tops are now about 18" tall and there are little rootlets (pinkie size).

For the rich loamy soil....well we might end up with Frankenstein meets mandrake type shapes in that particular bed.

mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: padre29 on November 27, 2009, 10:49:51 pm


Been embarrassed by a bumper crop of Parsley, so much so I've run out of uses for it and am thinking of making Parsley Oil.

Slugs got my small garden this year, they left the herbs alone but bored holes in my peppers, even jalapenos.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: kirgi07 on November 28, 2009, 01:18:33 am
Coarse salt on all inroads.Shoulda asked. Ought 7.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on November 28, 2009, 07:54:14 am
I wouldn't use salt anywhere near a garden.

I have, however, used wood ashes effectively, and they won't hurt the soil, rather it is a fertilizer - especially for alkaline soils. For soil that is already acid, might want to use one of the other methods.

If you have any access to coal ash, put it on the perimeter of the garden, well away from any soil that gets dug under. Snails and slugs hate that stuff. :) Any other really coarse mulch around the garden will help reduce the number of these pests as long as it can be kept dry. These critters need lots of moisture.

I've also heard that diatomateous earth is also good, especially if you can sprinkle it right on the slugs.

A saucer of stale beer under a tipped board will attract them in more or less large numbers too, but you then must collect and kill them.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on November 28, 2009, 08:38:39 am
This has nothing do do with salt or additives - the geese find slugs/snails to be the antithesis of their existance.  They also seem to take personal offense to pill/roly poly bugs.

DT works pretty well on slugs.

The last of the cauliflower (11 heads) made it's way off for pickled cauliflower and we have about a dozen crowns of brocolli left. Some kale, sorrel is still pulling it's weight, lemon balm is about to give up the ghost and garlic is happily doing it's thing.

We had our first hard freeze a few nights ago - about 5 weeks later than normal. That tells me that we might have more buggy issues next year. mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on November 28, 2009, 08:47:21 am
You must have different geese than I did. The one time they got into the garden, they quickly made such a disaster of it that I had many weeks of work before there was any significant production again. They totally destroyed the leafy vegetables, and at least trampled most of the rest. The chickens did similar damage the one time they got in when I was away from home.  Thank goodness I had a LONG growing season there. If that happened here, we'd go hungry.

I used to collect the snails and slugs each morning from under the boards and FEED them to the poultry. LOL  Worked much better for me that way.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Rarick on November 28, 2009, 09:22:42 am
Anything "edgy" Diatoms, Pumice, Cinder, Gypsum will do to seriously discourage any of the molusk/chephalopods.  Dry/ water loving materials will do the same thing.   Stretches of "sunny dry" also go a long way to keeping the crawlies out.  Keep the grass mowed short around the veggy garden if you have to neglect other areas of the "Lawn".

I mostly do raised bed/ planter style gardening right now, but I remember the garden when I was growing up and we had Nasturtiums(Sp?) growing on the borders and kept it out in the open, away from the shade.  Dad put in a pumice stone pathway around it too, it made it easier to maintain the deer fence without getting muddy all the time.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on November 28, 2009, 01:30:08 pm
Quote
we had Nasturtiums(Sp?)

Oh yum! Did you know you can pickle the seed pod while still green to use like capers?  See here  (http://www.plantea.com/nasturtium.htm)if you are interested.


Yet another piece of useless information provided by mutti  ^_^
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on November 28, 2009, 02:39:20 pm
Quote
we had Nasturtiums(Sp?)
Oh yum! Did you know you can pickle the seed pod while still green to use like capers?

You can also flour and deep fry the blossoms, or use fresh in punch/ as garnish for other foods. I used to make a plate of deep fried nasturtium and squash blossoms for special company. The leaves and blossoms can be added to salads, or even used as lettuce in a sandwich. Peppery flavor. All parts of this plant are edible. They have no particular medicinal properties, but since they are easily grown indoors, could serve as a source of fresh green food during long cold winters.

But be warned... the nasturtium attracts aphids under the right conditions. I used to plant them under my roses and they would get covered with aphids. I'd then snip the stem just above the first notch from the ground, then destroy the plants to eliminate a zillion of the little pests.  The plants often put out new growth.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Rarick on November 28, 2009, 08:03:02 pm
yep, aphid magnets.  Did not know about the edibility tho'   Are there other plants that would provide pest control?
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on November 29, 2009, 05:11:03 am
Nasturtiums also keep deer away if you plant enough.
Apparently they think nasturtiums stink.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on November 29, 2009, 07:07:43 am
Nasturtiums also keep deer away if you plant enough.
Apparently they think nasturtiums stink.

Heck, I'll try anything. I know the deer don't like daffodils, but it is too dry here to grow them out where the trees are. I suspect there wouldn't be enough water for nasturtiums either, but it's worth a pack of seeds to try.

As for other insect repellent plants, that's a BIG subject.  I used to grow marigolds all through my garden, especially around the tomato and pepper plants. They seem to confuse the moth that lays the eggs which turn into the big tomato worms. I had fewer bad insects in my garden when I grew lots of marigolds and calendula. There are lots of books on companion planting that will give you hundreds more ideas.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: gaurdduck on November 29, 2009, 09:09:14 am
I have a book called Carrots Love Tomatoes all about companion planting.
You sound like you could use it. Chapter 10 is all about pest control.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on December 01, 2009, 04:29:07 pm
'kraut is working. 225# of cabbage translated into: 1 12 gallon crock, 1 10 gallon crock, and a 4 gallon container made with caraway seed as a holiday gift for good friends. That left about 15#s to eat and 10#'s as give away to neighbors looking for fresh cabbage.
In about 4 - 6 weeks it'll be time to can.

Today is 'kraut '09 Day 1. Put up 41 quarts and 30 pints. Still have 2 batches left to do Then tomorrow I'll work on the rest of the 10 gallon crock.

mutti
(who is not particularly fond of 'kraut today)
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: crepemyrtle357 on December 02, 2009, 09:40:13 pm
Got a new almanac for the upcoming year. don't seem like we should have bothered. Rain, rain, rain.

But hopefully we will have our tractor up and running will make things work a little quicker if we get five days dry in a row. HA!
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on December 03, 2009, 07:56:19 am
Finished 'kraut. Total is equal to 101 quarts. Made some really cute little half pints for those who live alone and won't open the bigger ones unless it is a "special" occasion.

Almost time to make gift baskets - yea! I can't wait to see the faces of our friends when they get some goodies.

It has been a long year, but I think that we can declare Gardens '09 (with the exception of putting down goat straw, seeding areas with rye, and planning next years garden) done.

mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on December 03, 2009, 09:09:34 am
Finished 'kraut. Total is equal to 101 quarts. Made some really cute little half pints for those who live alone and won't open the bigger ones unless it is a "special" occasion.

This is just amazing, mutti. You always manage to astonish me. :)  I love kraut, and buy it in the little 8 oz cans - expensive that way. But I probably don't buy more than four cans a YEAR!! What in the world will you do with 101 quarts of the stuff. LOL  You obviously like it a lot more than I do.

The only time I buy a big jar of the stuff is when I have family coming and make pork roast and dumplings. It's a Polish recipe from a collateral relative that has become a favorite. Very simple: Roast the pork loin or other chunk until nicely brown, then remove the excess fat. Add about two cups of hot water and a quart of 'kraut around the meat and return to the oven until it bubbles. Drop in, by spoonfuls, regular baking powder biscuit dough onto the hot kraut and cover, returning to the oven. Bake about 30 minutes or until dumplings are done. We serve it with baked yams and cranberry sauce - the raw kind made with oranges, apples and walnuts. To die for. But I've not made it in at least ten years. sigh... no family here.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on December 03, 2009, 09:43:26 am
ML - about 30 pints were made special for some friends (with caraway seed) as their Christmas gift. I estimate about 20 quarts will go out in baskets as gifts for the holidays with a bottle of wine, jelly or salt pickles. Put in a dozen cookies, wrap it up and encourage people to eat or share as they find appropriate.

That leaves about 60+ quarts. When we sit down to eat, a quart jar will feed our family with leftovers for NDs lunch or as cracker toppings later in the week.  Minions would rather eat the kraut than meat - sometimes I'll cook up 2 quarts just to see them scarf as much as they would like down.   ^_^

So I'll be 'kraut flush until the next time (spring '11?) Unless I find out about someone who might need a little extra something to get them through a few difficult times, in which case I'll make sure to find some extra kraut, sausage and potatoes to share.  Hopefully the kraut will last a long time and none of our friends will go hungry.

Your meal sounds delicious! As an aside, how about cranberry prices this year? A 12 oz bag was $2.29 at Aldis this year - ouch! Thankfully I froze some from last year when I could purchase them at $.99 per 16 oz bag. I also can whole cranberry jam to use in a pinch.

mutti





Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on December 03, 2009, 10:31:07 am
Sounds like a wonderful gift! I used to make up baskets with assorted jams, jelly, dried fruit and nuts from my little "farm." They were always appreciated. One year I tried to give out chunks of my goat cheese, but most folks wouldn't even try it. Sad.

Other dishes with kraut come to mind, however. I'll have to start making some of these things for the "boys" here. And my sons will probably be here by spring.

My absolute favorite use for kraut is a "Ruben" sandwich. Fresh hot corned beef, swiss cheese, brown mustard and kraut on dark rye bread. Nothing else. I hate it when a restaurant puts on thousand island dressing. YUK

Get a large kilbasa or other Polish sausage. Layer kraut, sliced onions and celery in a greased baking dish. Slice sausage over the top and bake until bubbly and onions are clear. I serve this with hot sourdough rolls and LOTS of butter.

Oh, and I forgot the sliced onions that go with the pork roast too. :)  Been a long time since I made it. My aunt put peeled carrots in to cook with the onions and kraut... but I'm not all that crazy about carrots and kraut in the same dish.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Who...me? on December 03, 2009, 11:37:28 am
Quote
My absolute favorite use for kraut is a "Ruben" sandwich. Fresh hot corned beef, swiss cheese, brown mustard and kraut on dark rye bread. Nothing else. I hate it when a restaurant puts on thousand island dressing. YUK

+1 ML...I love Ruben samiches York (about 20 mins away) has a Jewish festival every year...you can get one that my wife and I can't finish.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on December 03, 2009, 12:07:50 pm
+1 ML...I love Ruben samiches York (about 20 mins away) has a Jewish festival every year...you can get one that my wife and I can't finish.

Yes, and one of the things I seriously miss here in the wooly west. I used to stop occasionally at a small deli called "The Brass Pickle" - owned and operated by a Jewish guy, transplanted from New York to southern California for some unknown reason. <grin> The Ruben sandwich there was the BEST - and a monster size. None of that ikky salad dressing on it either. :)

Now I just make my own when I can find decent corned beef.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on December 03, 2009, 12:16:41 pm
ML - Make your own! Know anyone butchering? We'll do this again once our next steer goes to slaughter.

From- (but posted the directions because of pictures for d/u users): http://www.kitchenproject.com/history/CornedBeef/MakeYourOwnCornedBeef.htm

Quote
2 quarts water
1 cup kosher salt
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 level teaspoons Pink Curing salt or Prague powder #1

1 cinnamon stick, broken into several pieces
1 teaspoon mustard seeds
1 teaspoon black peppercorns
8 whole cloves
8 whole allspice berries
12 whole juniper berries
2 bay leaves, crumbled
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
2 pounds ice
1 (4 to 5 pound) beef brisket, trimmed


Preparation:
Boil water, add salt, brown sugar, and saltpeter, stir to dissolve.

Add the Spices and let cool.

Place brisket in a large crock, zipper-style plastic bag or other non-metallic container. Pour marinade over meat.

. Meat should be submerged; use a weighted jar to hold meat under pickling solution. Refrigerate or set in a cool place for 10 days.

Note 1: Saltpeter is known commercially as potassium nitrate and is used to give the meat a pink coloring.

Note 2: Bottom round roasts may be substituted for the brisket for a leaner corned beef

If you do more than 1 you can either freeze after aging or put big slices up in pint jars. That way you can eat it whenever you'd like! mutti
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on December 03, 2009, 01:56:10 pm
I used to make all my own corned beef, though your recipe is quite different than the one I used. Thanks for it, and I'll certainly save it. Right now I've got about 150 lbs of antelope in the freezer, and will be doing good to get that eaten before it gets freezer burned. I may try using the recipe on some of the antelope, however. Can't hurt! :)

Just one question...

What do I do with the 2 pounds of ice?

Ok, two questions...

The recipe doesn't list saltpeter - unless that's the "pink curing salt or prague powder #1  (I never heard of either one.)
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: mutti on December 03, 2009, 02:31:10 pm
The ice is for putting into the brine in case it is not cool enough (in your case, maybe a few cubes for a Southern comfort?) The saltpeter is the "pink curing salt/prague powder".
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on December 03, 2009, 02:51:06 pm
The ice is for putting into the brine in case it is not cool enough (in your case, maybe a few cubes for a Southern comfort?) The saltpeter is the "pink curing salt/prague powder".

Check! I'll see if I can find some of that "curing salt" when I go to town next time. Don't think I'd need the ice. All I'd have to do would be to set it out on the deck for a few minutes. We hit a high of 10 degrees today. <grin>

Ok, one MORE question... why "kosher" salt? It's just salt approved by a rabbi. I suspect the beef won't care. I have lots of salt without iodine, which is what I use for pickling and meat curing. Would that do?
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Jake on May 26, 2016, 01:25:52 am
Quote
we had Nasturtiums(Sp?)
Oh yum! Did you know you can pickle the seed pod while still green to use like capers?

You can also flour and deep fry the blossoms, or use fresh in punch/ as garnish for other foods. I used to make a plate of deep fried nasturtium and squash blossoms for special company. The leaves and blossoms can be added to salads, or even used as lettuce in a sandwich. Peppery flavor. All parts of this plant are edible. They have no particular medicinal properties, but since they are easily grown indoors, could serve as a source of fresh green food during long cold winters.

But be warned... the nasturtium attracts aphids under the right conditions. I used to plant them under my roses and they would get covered with aphids. I'd then snip the stem just above the first notch from the ground, then destroy the plants to eliminate a zillion of the little pests.  The plants often put out new growth.
Thanks ML, and great to know.  I have planted Borage, calendula, Violet, nasturtium,Shungiku, and Love in the mist down one side of the garden.  If you know how to handle some of these other flowers for eating, please share.
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: MamaLiberty on May 26, 2016, 05:11:11 am

Thanks ML, and great to know.  I have planted Borage, calendula, Violet, nasturtium,Shungiku, and Love in the mist down one side of the garden.  If you know how to handle some of these other flowers for eating, please share.

I think the quoting cascade got damaged, since I didn't write that... but yes, I use a lot of flowers in my diet. I buy dried hibiscus flowers (since they won't grow here) for a tonic tea, often mixed with peppermint or other teas, but especially with lemon juice. Far more refreshing than plain lemonade, much as I love that too, and better than plain iced tea from regular black tea. Or at least as a refreshing change.  I also grow and use a lot of chamomile, the flowers being the part used. Squash blossoms are also wonderful if floured and deep fried, though I've not done that since I left California. The squash blossoms here are encouraged gently to produce squash, and there are few or none to spare for other things. :)

Can't think of any others right now, but I'm sure there are some. :)
Title: Re: Gardens 2009
Post by: Klapton Isgod on May 26, 2016, 08:00:52 am
Hibiscus tea has insanely high anti-oxidant content.  I brew it and mix it with store-bought berry "smoothie" beverages both to lower the sugar dose I get and to stretch that expensive juice longer.  I will also often cut it with grape juice, since that too is anti-oxidant rich, but not as expensive as the berry juices.