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Special Interest => Gulching/Self-Sufficiency => Food, Cooking, Brewing, Vinting, Distilling => Topic started by: gaurdduck on June 09, 2009, 09:41:05 pm

Title: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on June 09, 2009, 09:41:05 pm
I'm starting this off with ramen, but Ratatouille, is forthcoming.

Quote
Miso Ramen with Chicken and Vegitables

1 piece kombu(for dashi)
7 cups water
1/4 cup dark miso with the bonito already mixed in
2 cubes chicken bouillion
2 tbs shoyu(soy sauce)

6 cups +/- prepared rice noodles

2 lbs diced chichken
1.5 lbs mixed chopped veggies of your choice
         (I use bean sprouts, bell peppers, green onion, roasted seaweed, daikon, carrots, maitake mushrooms cuccumber,
          and shelled edamame)
Tofu &/or naruto if you like, as much as you like.
A fried egg for each bowl

Put kombu and water in a pot and bring to a boil, fish out the kombu and discard it. Then add the miso and bouillion and stir untill the miso dissolves. Add the shoyu. Then stirfry the veggies and chicken in sesame oil with a splash of sake(an all rice kind is best). Put 1 cup noodles in each bowl and ladle on the soup, top with the chicken, veggies and egg. Eat while watching old Naruto re-runs.(the show not the steamed fish paste)

Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: amagi on June 09, 2009, 09:56:51 pm
I would like a definition/ description please for Kombu and Shoyu.  :huh:
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on June 09, 2009, 10:26:32 pm
I would like a definition/ description please for Kombu and Shoyu.  :huh:

Kombu is a kelp from the Pacific Ocean
Shoyu is soy sauce

Just to clairify; the rice noodles are rice vermicelli or chinese rice sticks and the directions for preparing them are found on the package.

I also put fish sauce in my ramen as a condiment but it's not traditional.

You can get all this stuff at an asian market.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: DPR 2006 on June 10, 2009, 01:11:29 am
Arigato-o gozaimasu, Gaurd Duck!

BTW, do you take your handle from the "Pearls Before Swine" character? :mellow:
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on June 10, 2009, 01:31:50 am
You're welcome.

And yes, my alias comes from the Pearls comic.
I can relate to the trigger happy duck. :laugh:
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Who...me? on June 10, 2009, 03:31:17 pm
You're welcome.

And yes, my alias comes from the Pearls comic.
I can relate to the trigger happy duck. :laugh:

My favorite pearls toon


Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on June 10, 2009, 04:11:21 pm
Ratatouillie

1/4 cup butter
1 onion cut into cresants
3 tbs minced garlic
1 large or 2 small zuccinni in 1 " cubes
1 cuccumber sedded, peeled, and diced
1 large tomato
1/2 lb diced and browned potato
1 pack sliced portabello mushrooms
1 tsp salt
1 tbs parseley
1 tsp basil
pepper to taste
1 can tomato sauce
1 red bell pepper minced fine
water to cover

Sweat onions and garlic then add all else and simmer on low 3-6 hrs best served with sourdough toast and a homebrew.

Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on June 21, 2009, 04:59:11 am
Ochazuke
(oh-cha-zoo-keh)
makes 1 serving

1.5 cups Steamed white rice
2 tsp bonito flakes
2 tsp shoyu (soy sauce)
1 tsp wasabi
1 tbs minced green onion
2 tbs shredded nori
1 cup green tea(hot)


Put all the ingredients in a bowl in order then stir and consume.
Despite what seems to be a strange combination, this soup rocks!
It is like no other flavor you've ever tasted, but I bet you'll want another bowl.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Disavowed spook on June 22, 2009, 10:09:22 pm
Take 4-6 pigeon hatchlings before thier feathers come in. (don;t use the ones you plan to race or breed)
Pop off heads and disembowel. Wash thoroughly. Soak in cool salty water while you clean 4-5 medium carrots and 2-3 marble sized cloves of garlic.

Start a 5 quart pot of water to boil with 3 1/2 quarts of water in it.
Add whole peeled carrots and garlic and 1/8 tsp. salt and lil baby "squab" carcasses.
Bring to gentle simmer....no bubbling....just one here and there.....DO NOT boil hard.
Cook for 30-40 minutes, gently remove the whole carcasses and carrots and set aside.
Preheat oven to 400.
Mix 3/4 c. cream of wheat with one fresh egg, a dollup of sour cream and some salt and pepper.
Put squab in oven.
Take 2 spoons and make quinelle dumplings placing in hot broth until mixture is used up then turn of heat and add your sliced cooked carrots.
Take pigeons out of oven when skin is crisped up.
Put the soup in a bowl with a pinch of pepper ...put the birds on a platter...dig in.

You can use older birds if ya want, but plucking a pigeon is a real pain in the AZZZZZZZZZ
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Disavowed spook on June 22, 2009, 10:28:55 pm
Same 5Q pot.
1 head cabbage  (5-7 inches diameter) cut into 1 inch or so squares Can use Snow or nappa cabbage too if you julienne it.
Heat 4Q water or chicken stock to boil. Add cabbage and cook until soft to your liking.

When cabbage is cooked turn down heat to simmer, add 1 1/2- 2 c. yogurt or sour cream (your choice) and stir well, 2 Tsp. hungarian paprika (light red, sweet..if you use dark red, hot, it may taste bitter), salt to taste, pepper to taste and one diced roasted red pepper that has been cleaned and peeled after fire roastiing on open flame.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Disavowed spook on June 22, 2009, 10:35:49 pm
5 bunches @ 1 lb. fresh Watercress chopped roughly.
Add to 3qt. boiling chicken stock or water.

Cook until al dente then turn off heat.
Use a blender or burr mixer to liquify the mixture. Add fresh lemon juice, salt and pepper (white pepper) to taste and chill.
Serve chilled....55 degrees or so with a nice squirt of creme friache sour cream or yogurt and even a lil pea of wasabi or a nice mushroom duxelle. If you make a mushroom duxelle serve it warm in teh middle of the chilled soup.


I 'd try this with a Kombu duxelle.....but that would be a fusion of ethnicities....
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on June 23, 2009, 02:10:33 am
"You are making me hungry, You wouldn't like me when I'm hungry"
~The Hulk

Just wondering how you would make a kombu duxelle?
Seeing as How it is a very tough seaweed and all, that is almost
flavorless, and whose sole purpose is to enhance flavors already
present? It wouldn't make a very good topping by itself.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Disavowed spook on June 23, 2009, 11:05:33 am
"You are making me hungry, You wouldn't like me when I'm hungry"
~The Hulk

Just wondering how you would make a kombu duxelle?
Seeing as How it is a very tough seaweed and all, that is almost
flavorless, and whose sole purpose is to enhance flavors already
present? It wouldn't make a very good topping by itself.

Kombu Duxelle; I'd soak the Kombu in some sake or dilluted teriaki sauce for an hour or so first.
2 cups hydrated minced kombu drained.
1 hot saucepan. Carbon steel or seasoned cast iron,...or a nice wok.
add 2-3 Tbsp seame oil 1 tsp minced garlic with a touch of minced ginger and immediatley add the Kombu and toss or stir.....do it hot and fast stir fry style cause the sesame oil and garlic have low smoking points.
Add splash of sake or pernod at the very end.

Season with sea-salt and fresh cracked pepper and garnish with some raw or toasted sesame seeds.


I'd use pernod for the watercress soup garnish  Kombu duxelle..I think the Pernod would be nice with the bacony flavor of the watercress.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on June 23, 2009, 01:27:43 pm
"You are making me hungry, You wouldn't like me when I'm hungry"
~The Hulk

Just wondering how you would make a kombu duxelle?
Seeing as How it is a very tough seaweed and all, that is almost
flavorless, and whose sole purpose is to enhance flavors already
present? It wouldn't make a very good topping by itself.

Kombu Duxelle; I'd soak the Kombu in some sake or dilluted teriaki sauce for an hour or so first.
2 cups hydrated minced kombu drained.
1 hot saucepan. Carbon steel or seasoned cast iron,...or a nice wok.
add 2-3 Tbsp seame oil 1 tsp minced garlic with a touch of minced ginger and immediatley add the Kombu and toss or stir.....do it hot and fast stir fry style cause the sesame oil and garlic have low smoking points.
Add splash of sake or pernod at the very end.

Season with sea-salt and fresh cracked pepper and garnish with some raw or toasted sesame seeds.


I'd use pernod for the watercress soup garnish  Kombu duxelle..I think the Pernod would be nice with the bacony flavor of the watercress.


I'm sure convinced. I've never thought of soaking it in anything but water before.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Disavowed spook on June 23, 2009, 03:14:54 pm
Paradigms and control matrixes are everywhere.

Fusion cuisine is chemistry, is life, is the universe....jut depends on how big your bowl, fork and knofe, or gun is.

When you can relate to border guards that will steal from thier own people in thier own language and culture you can be treated like a guest.

It is considered poor taste and even overt hostility to be ignorant of a culture you seek hospitality from..

It's one of the things I find so offensive about Americans calling for the invasion of Iran when they haven't butchered a goat for kabobs or even made pistachio baklava before...they don;t know the culture or peoople beyond a wiki search and twitter account but are willing to add to their hardships on the whims of controlled media exposure.

More proof that they are still in the very control matrix they claim to despise.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on June 23, 2009, 03:22:55 pm
What are you talking about?
This is a food thread, not a political one.
Is that directed at me, or just a misplaced rant?!
I certainly don't want war with Iran. Heck one of my threads is about the possibilities for a freer Iran as a result of their new revolution.
If anything, I hope we can be friends in the future.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Disavowed spook on June 23, 2009, 04:09:49 pm
I'm pontificating about how food, ethnicity, and politics are connected, not makeing any personnal implications.

Food is a matter of cultural pride, just as much as politicsand ethnicity are...
Better understandings of one can only compliment the understanding of another.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Disavowed spook on June 23, 2009, 04:15:50 pm
What are you talking about?
This is a food thread, not a political one.
Is that directed at me, or just a misplaced rant?!
I certainly don't want war with Iran. Heck one of my threads is about the possibilities for a freer Iran as a result of their new revolution.
If anything, I hope we can be friends in the future.

You "never thought of soaking it in anything but water before". It's evidence of the influence of a control matrix or paradigm...be it culturally or colloquial, before you read my suggestion you had a box in which you soaked your Kombu in water.
It's not an insult, or intended as one,..just a firework to regard...."oh,..look at that."

Just like that cooking rat, the classics are seldom improved upon...but once in awhilea classic can get a little nudge, sneak in there and create a little 4th of july in your mouth.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on June 23, 2009, 05:21:00 pm
Now you are making some sense. :laugh:
Sorry 'bout the misunderstanding.

I usually use kombu to make dashi stock as a soup base or seasoning of sorts. Before this I never bothered trying to eat it, though I have seen a recipie for it before, I didn't try it because I was worried it may not be chewable, or otherwise tasty, but I intend to try your suggestion next time the need arises for a teriyaki-ish garnish with seaweed in it. :laugh:
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Disavowed spook on June 23, 2009, 10:54:16 pm
now I want a pound of sesame seaweed salad....
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on June 24, 2009, 12:46:33 am
I want some roasted eel onigiri with black sesame seeds, avacado, and after that a sakura mochi.
Itedakimasu! ^_^
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Disavowed spook on June 24, 2009, 11:57:32 am
I settled for a pork chop with onions glazed in lemon juice and lemon zest.
too hot for soups.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on June 24, 2009, 02:26:56 pm
I just had an egg sausage and potato hash for brunch.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on August 07, 2009, 01:27:50 pm
Thanks Gaurd Duck. I'll try to post my Hokkaido no Ramen recipe there later.
Warning: not responsible for possible tongue related injuries :ph34r: 

の worries there. My guess is it either has alot of wasabi or an inordinate
amount of shichimi togarashi. Just guesses though.

I'm about to go make lunch, in the form of rice and chicken salad.
My chicken salad is a little unorthodox.
(It's just chicken, shoyu, mayo, yuzuiri shichimi, garlic, and ginger.)
Who knows? Maybe I'll make it all into chicken salad onigiri topped
with toasted black sesame seeds. If it was later in the day, I'd have
a warm sake with that.

Now I'm really hungry...
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: icbkr on August 07, 2009, 03:06:16 pm
alot of wasabi

wasabi shumai are my favorite.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: SoupMonkey on August 07, 2009, 03:43:10 pm
I buy bags of chili Japones(Japanese chilies)from the Mexican section at Piggly Wiggly. The miso helps, or so my previous victims have claimed .
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on August 07, 2009, 11:32:11 pm
Which miso do you use? Red or White?
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: SoupMonkey on August 08, 2009, 01:24:42 pm
This is La Yu oil a basic condiment for Chinese/Japanese soups and stews.
This will perk up even the blandest canned/instant soups.
Warning this is pretty much homemade pepper spray
so please be careful.

1    cup peanut oil
1/4 cup sesame oil
1/4 cup crushed red chilies
1    tsp whole black peppercorns(or Szechuan  pepprcorns)

Heat both oils in a heavy bottomed pan until  it shimmers.
Quickly add the peppers stir, cover and remove from heat.
Let cool and strain into a clean glass jar. Cap it off and store
in the cupboard(no light, no heat).

I can't give you an accurate shelf life other than a couple of months,
I use it up too fast.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on August 08, 2009, 01:36:48 pm
Hmmm...
It sounds like hot-oil to me.
Could I make it with Thai Hot Peppers?
Those are my favorites. Only reason I ask,
is that Cayenne and Japanese peppers aren't hot enough.*






* Yes I'm a chilli head. (A fiery foods enthusiast) :violent5:
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: SoupMonkey on August 09, 2009, 07:09:48 am
The miso I use is a mix of white and red.Thai chilies are good.I have tried ground Thai and
I found it lacks the punch of of whole dried peppers, your mileage may vary.
And yes, La Yu is the Japanese variant of the Chinese for hot/chili oil,
or so I was told in an old semi-forgotten cookbook.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: SoupMonkey on August 09, 2009, 09:49:26 am
Gaurd Duck, just out of curiosity, what types of Japanese chillies have you previously tried?
The ones I use are small red devils that are very similar to the Thai bird's eye variety.
Always nice to find a fellow "fire-eater" :ph34r:
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Hollywoodgold on August 09, 2009, 03:37:34 pm
While not being haute cuisine, I have developed a satisfying soup dish that has been influenced by my travels in Asia and can be varied diversely depending on refrig contents and preferences.

I start with Ramen noodles and use chicken stock instead of water to cook it. Before cooked, I add the soup's ingredients that are sliced and/or chopped for quick cooking. I add the denser ingredients first, like carrot or broccoli and the softer ingredients towards the end. So, to the noodles add, thin sliced carrot, chopped/sliced onion, sliced beef, chicken, venison, pork or shrimp, hot peppers either fried Chinese, jalapeno, serrano piquin, Thai etc., and then finish with mushrooms sesame oil and chili paste with black fermented soybeans and scallion. Even a spicy rendered thinly sliced sausage works as the meat. Like a shabu shabu, lesser quality meats can be thinly sliced so they are both palatable and easy to chew. I lean on the spices depending on the meat chosen and you can add peanuts, cilantro, fresh ginger and even a raw egg depending on what you prefer.

This is a complete meal and can be very reasonable in cost. I analyzed the costs of a typical version I do and it was about $1.50 per dinner serving per person. What most people like about it is that it is fulfilling and satisfying as a meal.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on August 09, 2009, 04:12:37 pm
Gaurd Duck, just out of curiosity, what types of Japanese chillies have you previously tried?
The ones I use are small red devils that are very similar to the Thai bird's eye variety.
Always nice to find a fellow "fire-eater" :ph34r:

Just the wide red ones you get at the Mexican store, and whatever one they put in shichimi.
I think I've got some in the cupboard.


While not being haute cuisine, I have developed a satisfying soup dish that has been influenced by my travels in Asia and can be varied diversely depending on refrig contents and preferences.

I start with Ramen noodles and use chicken stock instead of water to cook it. Before cooked, I add the soup's ingredients that are sliced and/or chopped for quick cooking. I add the denser ingredients first, like carrot or broccoli and the softer ingredients towards the end. So, to the noodles add, thin sliced carrot, chopped/sliced onion, sliced beef, chicken, venison, pork or shrimp, hot peppers either fried Chinese, jalapeno, serrano piquin, Thai etc., and then finish with mushrooms sesame oil and chili paste with black fermented soybeans and scallion. Even a spicy rendered thinly sliced sausage works as the meat. Like a shabu shabu, lesser quality meats can be thinly sliced so they are both palatable and easy to chew. I lean on the spices depending on the meat chosen and you can add peanuts, cilantro, fresh ginger and even a raw egg depending on what you prefer.

This is a complete meal and can be very reasonable in cost. I analyzed the costs of a typical version I do and it was about $1.50 per dinner serving per person. What most people like about it is that it is fulfilling and satisfying as a meal.

It sounds really good. I'm already making dango, and tomorrow will eat roasted eel and rice, but I wanna try this sometime.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Hollywoodgold on August 09, 2009, 04:18:47 pm
Gaurd Duck, just out of curiosity, what types of Japanese chillies have you previously tried?
The ones I use are small red devils that are very similar to the Thai bird's eye variety.
Always nice to find a fellow "fire-eater" :ph34r:

Just the wide red ones you get at the Mexican store, and whatever one they put in shichimi.
I think I've got some in the cupboard.


While not being haute cuisine, I have developed a satisfying soup dish that has been influenced by my travels in Asia and can be varied diversely depending on refrig contents and preferences.

I start with Ramen noodles and use chicken stock instead of water to cook it. Before cooked, I add the soup's ingredients that are sliced and/or chopped for quick cooking. I add the denser ingredients first, like carrot or broccoli and the softer ingredients towards the end. So, to the noodles add, thin sliced carrot, chopped/sliced onion, sliced beef, chicken, venison, pork or shrimp, hot peppers either fried Chinese, jalapeno, serrano piquin, Thai etc., and then finish with mushrooms sesame oil and chili paste with black fermented soybeans and scallion. Even a spicy rendered thinly sliced sausage works as the meat. Like a shabu shabu, lesser quality meats can be thinly sliced so they are both palatable and easy to chew. I lean on the spices depending on the meat chosen and you can add peanuts, cilantro, fresh ginger and even a raw egg depending on what you prefer.

This is a complete meal and can be very reasonable in cost. I analyzed the costs of a typical version I do and it was about $1.50 per dinner serving per person. What most people like about it is that it is fulfilling and satisfying as a meal.

It sounds really good. I'm already making dango, and tomorrow will eat roasted eel and rice, but I wanna try this sometime.

Like many simple food dishes, freshness of ingredients and proper cooking time are key. I like the meat cooked medium, the vegetables crispy and the noodles just cooked enough.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: SoupMonkey on August 09, 2009, 05:32:10 pm
Mexican peppers are kind of hard to gauge, as they depend on the area in which they are grown.
The kind of peppers they put in schichmi togarashi are actually peppercorns, not red devils;
they are basically reddish peppercorns(weak cousins of the Chinese variety).

Try this:
3(or more) Thai chilies(dried and toasted)
1 Tbsp toasted sesame seeds
1 tsp dried tangerine skin(not rind)
1 tsp finely cut nori
(extras can be added according to taste and desire)
Coarsely grind the above together, except the sesame seeds, they go in
last and whole.Store like any other spice.
Use liberally, and use it quickly because nori tends to overwhelm
everything else after a while.

This one is good as a fridge cleaner(well, for me it is)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Budae_jjigae
I would be interested in your variations.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: icbkr on August 09, 2009, 05:41:13 pm
I just searched for "gaurd duck soup" and started laughing hysterically.  It's still funny.

Anyway, what I need is help.  How do I stop following this thread?  I've been to the help files, searched the forums, and yet I still can't stop stuff popping up in my "replies to stuff you wrote".  There must be a way to take stuff off the radar.  Help?

icbkr
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: SoupMonkey on August 09, 2009, 06:29:36 pm
Dear icbkr:
Pitiful human we control your very existence :ph34r:
Also see my next post for roast Gaurd Duck and Monkey Soup.
We are in the twilight limits of the outer zone.
Unless you don't have a 1963 Zenith floor model TV.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on August 09, 2009, 07:29:15 pm
I just searched for "gaurd duck soup" and started laughing hysterically.  It's still funny.

Anyway, what I need is help.  How do I stop following this thread?  I've been to the help files, searched the forums, and yet I still can't stop stuff popping up in my "replies to stuff you wrote".  There must be a way to take stuff off the radar.  Help?

icbkr


Just don't post for a week or so, and It'll just dissapear.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: SoupMonkey on August 09, 2009, 08:00:38 pm
Quote
There must be a way to take stuff off the radar.  Help?
Quote
ust don't post for a week or so, and It'll just dissapear.

Gaurd Duck, it is your sig, he keeps forgetting what to do with superglue.
Oh crap, I almost managed to forget about the 70s.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on August 09, 2009, 08:30:08 pm
Are you tripping? :thrshocker:
.
..
...
....

Just a thought, Let's start a ... ummm... thread on freeing your mind, dudes...
20 grams of Stilton cheese has comparable visuals to LSA.

Or we could just keep on about Asian food.
OTOH, My specialties are Californian, Mexican, and Tex-Mex.
I am from SoCal afterall. My exploration of all things
Japanese is a recent development. I've been cooking since
before I could read. And I learned that a few years ahead of my peers.

I'm also a moonshiner/ homebrewer/ homevintner.
I'm not sure whatcha call it, but I also make mead.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: SoupMonkey on August 09, 2009, 09:19:48 pm
Quote
Are you tripping?
If you knew what the year 1977 meant to me, you
would be even more paranoid than I am. A frightening
proposition no matter how you look at it.
Sorry to hear your from LoCal. I'm a respectable
Irish redneck swamprat from down South.
Moonshiner's grandson and damned proud of it.
Alcoholic in intervals. Copperhead Road !
Standard disclaimer: The author of this post
neither condones the use of alcohol, drugs
and/or going down Copperhead Road.
Tomorrow I will be sober, but the world will still be ugly.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Hollywoodgold on August 09, 2009, 10:07:35 pm
Here is a recipe for a seasoning salt taught me by a Hunan Chef. It is a great dry rub for boar, venison, beef and wildfowl.

Roast in a heavy dry iron frying pan 1 part Chinese red pepper corns (aromatic type), two parts star anise and three parts salt. Stir constantly untill the star anise starts to turn very dark and the misture begins to smoke.

Take of the stove

Grind the mixture into a powder using a mortar and pestle.

Store in a jar or cannister.

Use this magic salt on the aforementioned meats and lightly as a salt on grilled vegetables. Let the meat season for a minimum of 2 hours, preferably 4 hours and OK if overnight. Bake, broil or grill meats so treated.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: socalserf on August 09, 2009, 11:43:25 pm
OK here goes....

Aku boat delight.
Cook one package of Sapporo Ichiban noodles, drain.
Add several tablespoons mayo, mix.
Garnish with Katsuo Furikake.
(This is my reciepe and most folks don't care for it, be warned.)


Kabocha
2 lbs. kabocha squash, peeled and diced into 1"x1" cubes (approx. 6 cups)
1/2 cup water (or dashi if you have it)
2 Tablespoons sugar
1 Tablespoon soy sauce
Shitake mushroos, dried
1 Fish cake,(Kamaboko, I like Amano brand from Hilo HI)
2 abura-age (Deep fried tofu)
Soup Nori to taste, (I like lots) this is basically dried kelp

Start by hydrating the mushrooms and Nori. This should be done several hours ahead.
Cut up fish cake, and Age coursely. When the seaweed and mushrooms are tender cut them up too.
Put in soup stock pot with Dashi soup base(or warter) and add sugar, soy and salt. Simmer.
Wash kabocha and dry. If the skin is in good condition, there's no need to peel it. Cut in half, and again into quarters. Scoop out the seeds then cut into 1"x1" cubes.
Add the kabocha cubes. Bring to a boil and place lid on pan, turning down heat to a low simmer for 15 minutes. Keep an eye on the amount of liquid in the saucepan, you don't want it all t o evaporate and burn the kabocha. Cook until done, when a chopstick easily pierces the flesh without it falling apart. You don't want the kabocha too hard or too mushy.
Serve chunks hot or cold with any leftover liquid sauce.

My mother-in-law makes this and it's wonderful!
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: DPR 2006 on August 10, 2009, 01:53:28 am
Quote
Aku boat delight

EVIL boat delight?!?!  ^_^
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: socalserf on August 10, 2009, 05:59:04 am
Quote
Aku boat delight

EVIL boat delight?!?!  ^_^

Sure, why not?
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on August 10, 2009, 06:33:33 am
Quote
Are you tripping?
If you knew what the year 1977 meant to me, you
would be even more paranoid than I am. A frightening
proposition no matter how you look at it.
Sorry to hear your from LoCal. I'm a respectable
Irish redneck swamprat from down South.
Moonshiner's grandson and damned proud of it.
Alcoholic in intervals. Copperhead Road !
Standard disclaimer: The author of this post
neither condones the use of alcohol, drugs
and/or going down Copperhead Road.
Tomorrow I will be sober, but the world will still be ugly.


Just 'cause I'm from CA, doesn't mean I can't be a redneck.
I live in NC. I'm a moonshiner. Biscuits and Chocolate Gravy is my favorite breakfast.
There is a broken down car in my yard. I have a brother named Bubba.
I like boiled crawdads. I drink sweet tea by the quart.
1 of my 8 uncles is a biker. I met WV's biscuit lady.
I own three books by Jeff Foxworthy. Most of their contents apply to some relative or another.
I've gone noodling. I've fished with explosives.
See?
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: socalserf on August 10, 2009, 06:41:41 am
I've fished with explosives.


Couldn't find worms? ^_^
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: icbkr on August 10, 2009, 06:42:52 am
star anise is one of the key ingredients in tamiflu.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on August 10, 2009, 06:43:15 am
I've fished with explosives.


Couldn't find worms? ^_^

Nope. Didn't have a rod and line. Plenty of worms.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: SoupMonkey on August 11, 2009, 06:57:13 am
Wish I could afford a broken down car in my front yard. But then the city would just adjust my propert taxes to reflect a new addition :wacko:
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Zookeeper on August 11, 2009, 12:02:53 pm
G.D   Would you post the recipe for Chocolate Gravy? The kids loved it, but Gramma passed before I could learn how to make It.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on August 11, 2009, 12:22:47 pm
I had to get Granma's Permission first. Up until now it has been a family secret, but she said Okay, so I am starting a gravy thread just for it. I'm sure everyone will want to share a recipe of their own for their favorite gravy.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on August 11, 2009, 12:53:34 pm
New Gravy thread:

http://thementalmilitia.com/forums/index.php?topic=23283.new#new
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: socalserf on August 12, 2009, 08:58:43 am
We grow Shishito peppers for my mother-in-law.
Every year we have a bumper crop, but my wife and I aren't crazy about them.
They are too mild in both heat and flavor.
Niether jalapeno not pablano.

So my wife was on the web and found this reciepe for tempura peppers, OH MY GOD!!!
http://www.starchefs.com/features/shishito_peppers/recipe_shishito_tempura.shtml
Now we love shishitos.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: SoupMonkey on August 13, 2009, 01:26:12 pm
The aji peppers  used for the aji amarillo dipping sauce in the linked recipe intrigue me.
 I'm definitely going to have to investigate them.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on September 14, 2009, 04:35:07 pm
Miso soup is uber cheap and the components are all good keepers in the frige or pantry.
2    cups   Dashi Stock
2    Tbs    Miso Paste, any kind*
1/4 cup    Diced Tofu, Silken or firm*
3             Sliced Green onions*
To taste   Shoyu (Optional)
To taste   Mushrooms (Optional)

This and a bowl of rice with an umeboshi, and you're all set for Dinner.
Buy all the dry stuff in bulk and you can even get some of this stuff dehydrated or canned.
I have this meal about twice a month.



*More if you like.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: bull on September 21, 2009, 06:37:09 pm
would grits be considered a soup if served for dinner ? since i make 5 gals. of chili a day 5 days a week
I'm always looking for some thing new, garlic and cheese grits. grits with coco and brown sugar.
havinero peppers when fresh are my local favorite. kimshe peppers when i can find them.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Clip Johnson on September 21, 2009, 07:31:06 pm
Miso soup is uber cheap and the components are all good keepers in the frige or pantry.
2    cups   Dashi Stock
2    Tbs    Miso Paste, any kind*
1/4 cup    Diced Tofu, Silken or firm*
3             Sliced Green onions*
To taste   Shoyu (Optional)
To taste   Mushrooms (Optional)

This and a bowl of rice with an umeboshi, and you're all set for Dinner.
Buy all the dry stuff in bulk and you can even get some of this stuff dehydrated or canned.
I have this meal about twice a month.


*More if you like.

That sounds goooood GD. Where would a feller get the ingredients - are they available at most Asian markets? And what is Shoyu?

And BTW, I'm all for you posting more recipes when and if you feel like it. Sounds like you are quite a great cook and have quite a few Asian/Japanese recipes. 


would grits be considered a soup if served for dinner ? since i make 5 gals. of chili a day 5 days a week
I'm always looking for some thing new, garlic and cheese grits. grits with coco and brown sugar.
havinero peppers when fresh are my local favorite. kimshe peppers when i can find them.

Hey bull, in the south here, grits can easily be served as an appetizer, main course, breakfast, lunch, dinner, snack, etc, etc, etc.

Am I understanding this correctly, you make how much chili a week? I guess you must be feeding quite a few folks! :occasion14:
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: bull on September 21, 2009, 08:45:13 pm
5 gals. Daly my cafe is open 4 hours a day ,home cut Fry's and sliced cheese covered with Chile, grilled onions and jalos.
tomorrow home made chicken noodle soap. its only 11 ft. wide and 45 feet long if you're looking you can miss it.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Clip Johnson on September 21, 2009, 09:07:10 pm
5 gals. Daly my cafe is open 4 hours a day ,home cut Fry's and sliced cheese covered with Chile, grilled onions and jalos.
tomorrow home made chicken noodle soap. its only 11 ft. wide and 45 feet long if you're looking you can miss it.

Something tells me you are not anywhere near NC, cause if you were, I'd be having lunch over there with ya. Sounds good.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on September 21, 2009, 10:33:24 pm
Miso soup is uber cheap and the components are all good keepers in the frige or pantry.
2    cups   Dashi Stock
2    Tbs    Miso Paste, any kind*
1/4 cup    Diced Tofu, Silken or firm*
3             Sliced Green onions*
To taste   Shoyu (Optional)
To taste   Mushrooms (Optional)

This and a bowl of rice with an umeboshi, and you're all set for Dinner.
Buy all the dry stuff in bulk and you can even get some of this stuff dehydrated or canned.
I have this meal about twice a month.


*More if you like.

That sounds goooood GD. Where would a feller get the ingredients - are they available at most Asian markets? And what is Shoyu?

And BTW, I'm all for you posting more recipes when and if you feel like it. Sounds like you are quite a great cook and have quite a few Asian/Japanese recipes. 

I'm also posting on http://www.justbento.com under the name オタク(Otaku)

Edited to add:
Shoyu is the Japanese name for soy sauce.

5 gals. Daly my cafe is open 4 hours a day ,home cut Fry's and sliced cheese covered with Chile, grilled onions and jalos.
tomorrow home made chicken noodle soap. its only 11 ft. wide and 45 feet long if you're looking you can miss it.

Something tells me you are not anywhere near NC, cause if you were, I'd be having lunch over there with ya. Sounds good.

I live in NC. You can come over here and eat one of my O-bento for $6-10 depending on contents. You will  be thrilled to know that the feds get 0% of my profits.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: bull on September 22, 2009, 02:00:59 am
being 280 lbs and an redneck if i wonted to eat i had to cook.
and i eat anything that doesn't eat me first, and will try anything.
I'm enjoying the subject of soup, haven't had beef in a month.
galstones as big as my fist, and i have been mixing horsradish and wasabie, with garlic and peppers for flavor.
I'm burnt out on food, and looking for something new and diffrent?
ham and beans last week, trying to flavor up chicken and noodles with out ruining it.
its a 2 hour drive to find some of those ingredients GD comes up with.
italion stake soup, catfish soup Cajun stile, cheese soup from Europe, any one know a real good french onion soup
resape?
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on September 22, 2009, 02:43:27 am
French Onion soup

1 tbs minced garlic
3 large yellow onions
2 tbs butter
1 tbs Worcestershire sauce
3 cups beef stock


cook the onions and garlic in the butter until the onions look clear.
add all the other stuff and bring to a boil.

Serve in a sourdough bread-bowl with asiago cheese on top accompanied by a 2006
Nappa Merlot or a home brewed honeyed ale.

How's that?
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: freewoman on September 22, 2009, 05:59:51 am
French onion soup tastes better if you cook the onions until they're soft and caramelized all over.  This requires a lower heat to start (so they soften and don't brown too quickly), and lots of stirring at the end.   I don't use worchestershire sauce in mine.  I also don't add a huge amount of stock.  It's more of a technique than a recipe.

For 4-6 servings (freezes well):

Start with 3 lb. onions.  Cut in half, peel, and then slice into small wedges.  You want them to be small enough to eat comfortably, but large enough to hold together in pieces during the long cooking time.  Add fat to cover the bottom of a large pot (3-5 quart works best for this).  You may use olive oil, or a combination of olive oil and butter; even duck or bear fat would work for this soup.  I would not use only butter; it tends to burn.  Heat the pan to medium-high to get it hot, and then lower to medium when you put the onions into it.  Sprinkle the onions with a bit of salt.  (The salt helps them to soften and "sweat" out their liquid.)  Stir often.  At first you can do a few other things while cooking it; I generally use this time to prep my toast, cheese, and bowls.

To prep the toast:  Prepare garlic toast however you'd like, and trim the pieces to fit inside your ovenproof bowl.  I find that if the bowl is rather shallow, a thinner toast works better; that way the onions are the star of the show.  You can use the brownware bowls with the little handles, or you can use any ovenproof bowl you've got.  Just make sure it's really ovenproof, as the broiler could mess with your lovely soup later!  I have used storebought garlic toast, but I prefer a sturdy wholegrain bread, toasted in the toaster oven, and rubbed with a clove of garlic.  That way you get the garlic taste without all the extra flavors contained in commercial garlic bread, so the onions can really be tasted.  YMMV.

To prep the cheese:  For many, the melted cheese on top of the soup is the best part.  (Unless you're lactose-intolerant or allergic to milk!  Use non-dairy cheese instead.)  Grate about 2-3 ounces of cheese for each bowl of soup.  Swiss cheese is traditional, but I've sometimes found it to be too greasy when melted.  I've also used muenster (somewhat soft but workable) and white cheddar (worked like a champ).  Mozzarella would work in a pinch, but it's a bit bland for this dish.  A sharper cheese seems to work better with the sweetness of the onions.

To prep the bowls:  Use only ovenproof bowls.  Place on a sturdy baking sheet.

  As the onions soften, however, you need to stay near the pot.  Eventually you will get a bunch of very limp onions.  At this point they will start to caramelize.  Take a look at the fat in the bottom of the pan; the onions should not be swimming in fat, but there should be a bit of fat coating the pan, or the onions may burn (and this can happen quickly).  Add a bit of oil if needed.  As the onions begin to brown, stay near the pan and stir often so they don't get stuck to the bottom of the pan.  (Don't stir constantly, though, or they won't brown and will fall apart!  There's a balance here. . . .)  When the onions are all evenly caramelized--I stop the process at a medium brown--add stock just to cover.  For 3 lb. of onions, that generally takes about a quart.  I have used beef, chicken, and vegetable stock, all to good effect.  You can also add a bit of wine; either red or white works.  If the stock more than covers the onions, boil a bit to bring the stock level down.

As the soup comes to a boil, I get the bowls ready.  Ladle onions in each bowl, up to near the rim.  Top each bowl with a piece of garlic toast.  Add cheese.  I start around the edges first, then fill in the middle.  Restaurants often serve onion soup with the melted cheese stuck all over the outside of the bowl, but to me, that's wasteful (yes, I'm Scottish!).  I do, however, like to be sure there's a "seal" of cheese over the top of the toast.  Place the bowl onto the baking sheet.  When your bowls are full, place in the oven and broil for around 5 minutes until the cheese is melted and bubbly.  Watch carefully, as they can go from bubbly to burnt in no time.  Handle the bowls with hot pads or oven mitts, as they're very hot.  Dig in and slurp away.

If you're freezing some of the soup, you may want to broil them a wee bit less--just until the cheese is melted--so that you can reheat later.  I allow the frozen soup to come to room temperature, and then heat it in a toaster oven, 1 or 2 at a time.

I'm sure some will quarrel with my method or ingredients.  But this method turns out a really good end product!  Have fun with it. 
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: bull on September 22, 2009, 03:58:03 pm
thanks GD ,and freewoman
 chicken and noddles was a big hit today ,french onion soup will be for  home only.
 And i cut up 5 lbs. of onions a day just to serve.  ill start a Bach in the morning.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Clip Johnson on September 22, 2009, 07:19:26 pm
I live in NC. You can come over here and eat one of my O-bento for $6-10 depending on contents. You will  be thrilled to know that the feds get 0% of my profits.

Although I don't have a clue what O-bento is, I'm all for trying new things on occasion. I'll send along a PM your way.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: bull on September 22, 2009, 07:46:04 pm
I should have asked earlier also, O - bento ,GD how about filling us in?
And freewoman on sane man would quarrel with woman chef  ever!!
                          BUll
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: chutzpah on September 22, 2009, 08:00:28 pm
Here is one of my favorites. Use any seafood available in season, fresh is best, but on off seasons, frozen and then canned in that order of preference is workable.

Seafood Bisque       Serves 4 or 2, (huge bowls)
 
 
Use 1 pint oysters chopped fine or, 6 oz. of any of the following: small shrimp, crab, crawfish, salmon or lobster meat, chopped fine.
3 Tablespoons butter
1 cup finely minced celery
2 Tablespoons all purpose flour
2 cups light cream for lower calorie, (can use heavy cream, it will be thicker and richer)
salt and white pepper to taste
6 Tablespoons sherry
1 Tablespoon chopped parsley
Paprika
 
If using oysters, reserve the liquor.
Melt 2 Tablespoons of the butter in top of double boiler over boiling water; add celery and heat until tender. Blend in flour, then gradually stir in cream, add seafood and liquor, blending well. Season to taste with salt and white pepper. Simmer, but do not permit bisque to come to a boil. Add 1 tablespoon butter, the sherry and parsley. Pour into hot tureen or serving bowls, sprinkle with paprika for color.
Easy, and quick!
Serve with crisp French baguette or crusty bread variety and a tossed salad.

Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on September 23, 2009, 03:38:13 am
I should have asked earlier also, O - bento ,GD how about filling us in?
And freewoman on sane man would quarrel with woman chef  ever!!
                          BUll

I live in NC. You can come over here and eat one of my O-bento for $6-10 depending on contents. You will  be thrilled to know that the feds get 0% of my profits.

Although I don't have a clue what O-bento is, I'm all for trying new things on occasion. I'll send along a PM your way.

Japanese Boxed Lunch.
Products offered:

Quote
Prices fluctuate based on cost of ingredients and seasonal availability.
I'm in Fayetteville, just South of FT Bragg.

O-Bento
Onigiri Bento(Rice balls with a filling)
Rising Sun Bento(Rice w/ an umeboshi, and akai-miso soup)
Assorted Sushi(maki, futo-maki, california roll, sashimi, nigiri-zushi)
Gyu-Donburi(beef cooked in sauce then served on a bed of rice)

Mexican Meal
Enchiladas(My Mom's secret recipe.)
Frijoles y arroz de Esp.
Sopes y carne
carne asada con limon
tacos
etc...

All American
Meatloaf dinner with mashed potatoes and green beans
Turkey dinner(seasonal)
Peach BBQ chicken with Hot German Potato Salad
Shepherd's Pie
Various soups and chillis
etc...


My business has been almost non-existent since this depression started.
I traded a sushi-bento for a ride to Ramseur.That's all I've had in over a month.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Disavowed spook on October 07, 2009, 02:06:25 pm
This is the most ethnic soup  (http://ethnic soup) I have ever seen.

http://www.seemysearch.com/babykillers/withphotos.htm

Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Bluelinegirl on October 07, 2009, 05:46:33 pm
Hmmm...
It sounds like hot-oil to me.
Could I make it with Thai Hot Peppers?
Those are my favorites. Only reason I ask,
is that Cayenne and Japanese peppers aren't hot enough.*

* Yes I'm a chili head. (A fiery foods enthusiast) :violent5:

heh heh heh We are going to get along famously!

Quick, easy Indian curry:

Most people's problem with cooking is fear of experimentation. If you dont like an ingredient leave it out or change it, if you like something different, add it. It works 90% of the time.  The mandatory ingredients here are the cumin, coriander, turmeric (you can use 1 tsp of yellow mustard if you have to...) garlic, ginger & onion. The meats are interchangeable too. Sometimes chicken, sometimes pork, beef, lamb or goat. I like to cook from ingredients I have on hand, from scratch and as cheap as possible, growing many of the ingredients myself. When I first started cooking Indian food, I dry roasted everything and measured everything and each dish took about two hours...now I just through it all in the pot and everyone raves so... I rarely measure anything, I just eyeball it. It seems long but I added tips, tricks and optional variances. The actual dish is short and simple.

In a 5 qt pot with a Tbs oil I add the about 1 whole chicken (i like dark meat, boneless skinless legs and thighs with all the fat trimmed off esp if I add butter. chicken fat has almost no flavor but butter, mmm)
1 inch cubed chicken first on medium high heat to brown it, shaking often. (Note: If you are adding 1/2 gallon of water, you can add the chicken bone and all but add the water now, otherwise wait till the end.)
1 tsp cumin (dont ever double this spice unless you are sure you want a strong cumin flavor. I grind it in my fingers straight into the pot. Its available at most groc. stores and is a must have pantry staple! )
1Tbs ground coriander (also a staple. also can be grown by letting your cilantro go to seed), add less if desired)
For heat, I like to mix a minimum of 3 different chilis. 2 whole, dried red (sometimes broken into pieces. save the seeds and grow them yourself) sometimes a small green hot chili, and 1/2tsp roasted chili powder.
1-2 tsp of cracked black pepper,
Sometimes 3 whole cloves p,
sometimes 1 broken up cinn. stick or 1/2-1tsp ground cinn.
1tsp salt. still shaking and sometimes stirring, careful not to burn it.
I slice 4 large cloves of garlic,
sometimes 1-2 curry leaves, broken up (note most indian dishes that have a gravy are called 'curry' whether they add curry leaves or not. They usually dont but I like them)
and an inch of ginger, shave the skin/peel off, also in small slices (in my hand. Dont try unless youre confident with your knives and dont mind using your thumb as a cutting board :o
1 med sweet onion (also hacked up, I mean sliced in my hand (point being the pieces dont have to be pretty, just cut it up)
(secret ingredients:) about a 1/4 C ketchup,
1Tbs of butter (shhhh)
(you can add a little water here and turn the heat to medium if its starting to get dry. about 1C) .
The chicken is cooked at this point and the nearly dry dish is good here but
sometimes I add 1/2 tsp garam masala (available in most grocery stores. You can make it yourself if you are so inclined, its a blend of different spices and adds a robustness to it.)
a handfull of cilantro torn to pieces,
a can of tomatoes,
and sometimes a bag of frozen veggies of your choice. I like lima beans sometimes, chick peas, spinach, potatoes, green beans or any variation.
Add water to cover all, cook until the veggies are done according to the directions on the bag if you added them. You can cook a little longer to thicken if you want.
Sometimes I also add 3/4C of lowfat yogurt into the dish (note: dont buy the yogurt with gelatin in it, gross.)
And sometimes I toss 4-5 hard boiled eggs in before serving.
Serves about 6.
Enjoy with rice (I only like basmati, Tilda if you can find it.) plain low fat yogurt if you like (like a condiment, you dip your fork or spoon in it while youre eating.
You can also scoop it up with lays plain potato chips. :O
Its really easy and takes about 20-30 minutes and is super versatile. And clean up... 1 pot, 1 spoon and a ladle if you like.

Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Bluelinegirl on October 07, 2009, 06:04:51 pm
would grits be considered a soup if served for dinner ? since i make 5 gals. of chili a day 5 days a week
I'm always looking for some thing new, garlic and cheese grits. grits with coco and brown sugar.
havinero peppers when fresh are my local favorite. kimshe peppers when i can find them.

AH! I love when I have something to add. My absolute favorite is replacing rice with grits!! Any gravyish, curry, soup like dish will do.... just pour it on top :D OUTSTANDING!! Especially if you cant find a good rice.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: bull on October 07, 2009, 07:51:25 pm
veggie meddle this week, just about every thing in it. I'm us en Cajun seasonings and Greek, with kosher salt. fine mix not hot at all
real butter , i just add until its right, black beans ( rinse the beans) ,corn, green beans ,chicken stock , ground beef browned, tomato's,mixed vegetables,noodles, i have a wok i use quite a bit ,it makes reconstituting chicken stock a breeze, from a past or grits in a flash.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on October 07, 2009, 08:42:14 pm
would grits be considered a soup if served for dinner ? since i make 5 gals. of chili a day 5 days a week
I'm always looking for some thing new, garlic and cheese grits. grits with coco and brown sugar.
havinero peppers when fresh are my local favorite. kimshe peppers when i can find them.

AH! I love when I have something to add. My absolute favorite is replacing rice with grits!! Any gravyish, curry, soup like dish will do.... just pour it on top :D OUTSTANDING!! Especially if you cant find a good rice.


I eat alot of rice, so I occasionally substitute buckwheat groats, or oats for the rice in my meals.
BTW what kind of rice do you use? I use mostly koshihikari rice for donburi like what you described.
We just had that for dinner last night, it was cooked koshihikari mixed with hemp seed and toasted
sesame seeds, topped with a beef soboro and daikon. It was AWESOME! I'll prolly put the leftovers
in tomorrows obento.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Bluelinegirl on October 07, 2009, 11:06:48 pm
would grits be considered a soup if served for dinner ? since i make 5 gals. of chili a day 5 days a week
I'm always looking for some thing new, garlic and cheese grits. grits with coco and brown sugar.
havinero peppers when fresh are my local favorite. kimshe peppers when i can find them.

AH! I love when I have something to add. My absolute favorite is replacing rice with grits!! Any gravyish, curry, soup like dish will do.... just pour it on top :D OUTSTANDING!! Especially if you cant find a good rice.


I eat alot of rice, so I occasionally substitute buckwheat groats, or oats for the rice in my meals.
BTW what kind of rice do you use? I use mostly koshihikari rice for donburi like what you described.
We just had that for dinner last night, it was cooked koshihikari mixed with hemp seed and toasted
sesame seeds, topped with a beef soboro and daikon. It was AWESOME! I'll prolly put the leftovers
in tomorrows obento.

Sounds awesome.

Tilda brand (its Indian) long grain basmati. I have only found 1 or 2 other long grain basmatis that I can stand lol
I like regular rice for sushi and breakfast but Tilda is da bomb!

two quiky rice recipes:

10 minute rice. Ive used this method and it does work. rinse the rice, any amount, put two pots of water on to a boil, enough to cover the rice twice, its not important, (I know, it goes against everything we know about rice) boil both for 10 minutes, drain the rice and imediately dump it into the other boiling pan then drain again. Its perfect!...

2nd is a great super easy (which i like) biryani flavored rice dish, using a rice cooker! 1T oil or butter, 1 cup rice, 2 cups water, 1tsp cumin seeds whole, 1tsp coriander cracked, 1 broken up red chili, 2 cloves chopped garlic, 1/2 inch minced ginger or chopped, 1/2 -1tsp turmeric, 1 small onion sliced finely and a small handful of chopped cilantro. put all in the cooker, stir, put the lid on and hit start. Thats it. Its great too. you can also add some grated unsweetened coconut and you can also make the same dish on the stove with grits.

I reinvent my leftovers too :)
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on October 08, 2009, 01:15:04 am
None of these are soups, so If a MOD could move these last two to the O-bento thread it would be appreciated.

BLG, here is my bento thread, where it would be best to continue this conversation:
http://thementalmilitia.com/forums/index.php?topic=23915.0
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Bluelinegirl on October 09, 2009, 09:09:05 am
None of these are soups, so If a MOD could move these last two to the O-bento thread it would be appreciated.

BLG, here is my bento thread, where it would be best to continue this conversation:
http://thementalmilitia.com/forums/index.php?topic=23915.0

GD, no prob, but, if you add a gallon of water to the curry..... ;)
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: bull on October 14, 2009, 05:14:31 pm
ow!!! i cooked up some taters and corn in crawfish boil , just needed the heat.
black pepper ,butter , hot sauce, and seasonings. turned cold here a month early.
ill find something to add to it tomarrow, ???
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: socalserf on October 14, 2009, 10:21:41 pm
ow!!! i cooked up some taters and corn in crawfish boil , just needed the heat.
black pepper ,butter , hot sauce, and seasonings. turned cold here a month early.
ill find something to add to it tomarrow, ???

Crawfish boil, may favorite!!!!

Here is a recipe for a Tuscan White bean soup that we enjoy.

2-3 tabelsoops olive oil
3 cans white northern beans or use a pound of dried white beans that have been soaked overnight
2 onions
2 carrots
2 stalks celery
one table spoon dried thyme
2 oz. prosciutto or ham
one quart chicken stock of veggie stock
2 pounds of Italian sausage
On bunch of Kale

If using dried beans, cook in water until tender. About an hour.
In a large heavy pot saute sausage in the olive oil, brown on all sides. don't worry about cooking them all the way through. Remove and set aside to cool. Once cool cut into 1/4 inch slices, reserve.
In the pot add minced veggies and prosciutto(or ham) and thyme and saute in the left over fat from the sausage about ten minutes.
Meanwhile, drain the liquid from two of the bean cans. The third can Mash the beans in the cans liquid. This gives the soup a nice creamy texture. You can mash two cans or none depending on your taste preferences.
Add stock, sausage and beans, put on med heat until it starts to boil. Reduce to simmer for 30 minutes.
Stem the kale and cop med. Add in the last 10-15 minutes.
Serve with fresh bread on a cold winters night.

BTW, there are tons of variations on this classic recipe, do a search!

Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: freewoman on October 16, 2009, 10:41:15 am
The aji peppers  used for the aji amarillo dipping sauce in the linked recipe intrigue me.
 I'm definitely going to have to investigate them.

How did I miss this post?   :mellow:  I lived in Peru for 3 years.  Peruvian peppers are definitely their own animal; they have more flavor than many of the peppers you typically find in an American supermarket.  Grow your own if you can.  An acceptable substitute is yellow Hungarian wax peppers; they have about the same amount of heat.  The dried aji amarillo peppers aren't the same flavor as fresh.  If you have a Publix supermarket near you, try the Latin foods section (or if you have a Latin food market--a bigger one--they may have this item).  A couple of companies sell pureed aji amarillo and rocoto in a glass jar.  It works for Papas a la Huancaina and for sauces.  Happy hunting!

Now I'm hungry for Peruvian food. . . .
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: freewoman on October 16, 2009, 10:49:01 am
I just made up a big batch of Cincinnati chili today, and thought I might post a link to the recipe.  This one is pretty similar to Skyline chili, but doesn't cost $4 for two skimpy servings!  I spent about that much on the entire batch.  Don't be daunted by the list of ingredients; most are spices.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/sara-moulton/cincinnati-style-chili-recipe/index.html

I serve mine 5-way (spaghetti, chili, beans, onions, cheese).  I don't have any oyster crackers at present; they're classic accompaniments as well.

For those of you who have never had Cincinnati-style chili, it has molasses and sweet spices in it, which give it an unusual taste.  This freezes well.

Due to the spices, this chili would be a good use for game meat, if it's more gamey tasting than you'd like.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Andouille on November 28, 2009, 08:11:59 am
OK, for my grand opening post on this here board, No Ta-Mater Chili.  Absolutely no flame intended toward any other chili recipes, I have several others myself!

No Ta-mater Chili
Cause Charlie Goodnight didn’t have no ta-maters on the trail drives, comprende?  If you have to ask who’s Charlie Goodnight, you got no bidness making chili inna first place!  Google him!

4 pounds lean beef stew meat or brisket, trimmed of most of the fat.
3 tablespoons cooking oil.
5 tablespoons chili powder.  More if you want it.  I use 8 or 10.
1 tablespoon comino powder (cumin).  More if you like it.
2 baseball sized onions, chopped into 1/2 inch pieces.  Or softball sized if you like.
5 large cloves of garlic, finely chopped.
1 teaspoon ground oregano.
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste, about 1 tablespoon each to start.
1 tablespoon hot sauce from Louisiana or Texas, not New Jersey.
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper.

The day before you want to eat the chili, cook it.  Start by chopping the meat into ¼ to ½ inch pieces, but don’t get wrapped around the axle getting a uniform size.  You could also grind it using a grinder plate with LARGE holes.

Heat a large cast iron pot over medium high heat, then add cooking oil and add meat after the oil is hot.  DO NOT BROWN THE MEAT!  Stir it frequently until it turns a uniform gray color.  The meat will typically release a lot of water.  This is good.

Stir in the chili powder, comino, onions and garlic.  Add water as necessary to keep the mass semi-fluid.  Use beer instead if you want, dark beer is better.  Reduce heat to low and simmer uncovered, stirring occasionally for about 45 minutes.

Stir in the oregano and about half the salt, black pepper, hot sauce and cayenne pepper.  After this simmers 5 or 10 minutes, adjust the seasonings to your taste and simmer another 45 minutes, or longer if you have time, stirring occasionally and adding more water when necessary to keep the mass semi-fluid.  Remove from heat and refrigerate overnight, or set out on back porch if it’s cold enough.

The next day, heat to a simmer and cook for four or five hours, longer is better, all day is best.  This tenderizes the meat, thickens the juices and also turns the juices a nice deep brown color.  Stir occasionally and add water as necessary to keep the mass semi-fluid.

Check for taste at least an hour before you want to eat, and adjust as necessary.  If you’ve cooked the chili long enough, the onions will have disintegrated.  You could add some fresh chopped onion the last half hour or so for texture if you want.  Serve with cornbread or preferably warm flour tortillas whenever possible, with hot sauce on the side.  Feeds six or so, more or less.

If you are incapable of advance planning, or just insist on eating chili the same day you cook it, start early in the morning and let it simmer all day.  Time and low cooking temperatures are your friends with stew meat or brisket.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on November 28, 2009, 08:15:11 pm
Wow, sounds delicious.


Due to the spices, this chili would be a good use for game meat, if it's more gamey tasting than you'd like.

If venison didn't taste gamey it would taste like beef. Same for pheasant vs. chicken. Gamey = good.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Shanks Mare on May 08, 2010, 10:55:25 pm
I went through all SIX pages, even with a couple of folks claiming to be/know Tex-Mex....and not a SINGLE Menudo Recipe! Sheesh!  :mellow:

LOVE Chipino too!
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on May 09, 2010, 01:30:38 am
I don't like menudo. Pozole tho' is quite good. My Tia Rosa makes it pretty well. Just don't think about its contents...
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: booter on May 19, 2010, 05:39:57 am
Hey! 'Pirate King Luffy' it sounds like you're on the right track with your ingredients, I was born & raised in Hawaii - 'live in the Sierras' now, someone mentioned 'Furikake' you ever try 'Tsukudani' its' a little pricy but its' ONO-licious.  I slice up sheets of Nori (I use the Korean-type, roasted in sesame oil w/salt) into thin ribbons, heat your Shoyu in a large pan, add a bit of Mirin (sweet Japanese rice wine), add white sugar to taste (on the sweet-side like Teriyaki), simmer on a low flame for 15minutes & VOILA!  Store in a glass bottle in the fridge, try this in your Chazuke' or use as your filling core in Musubi, or just roll a bit of hot rice into a quarter sheet of Nori with a thin layer of this paste.  Its' really strong! so use sparingly, you can buy it @ Asian markets but homemade is better.

If you can find Okara (the leftover curds from soy milk production) that stuff is great! Google recipes for it.  Also in Asian markets look for 'dehydrated Shiitake mushroom powder' I've always found it 1kilo bags, wait 'til you try this stuff!  You mentioned venison, some find it 'too gamey' I make fried; potstickers, won ton, dim sum, yum cha, with a filling of; ground elk, venison, and coarse ground pork, the pork is to keep it moist (elk has very little marbleing).  Mix together with; diced green onions, water chestnuts, shoyu, & a little grated ginger, add sesame oil, and cornstarch (as a binder), and mix together then stuff your won ton skins.  Korean sauces for; Kal bi, or Koje Jung (like a sweet-sour-spicy Teriyaki-like sauce) is killer with these.  Aloha! & keep up the posts!       
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on May 19, 2010, 02:51:07 pm
I should have asked earlier also, O - bento ,GD how about filling us in?
And freewoman on sane man would quarrel with woman chef  ever!!
                          BUll

Sorry bull, I didn't see this post of yours until just now. I made a thread on it.

Hey! 'Pirate King Luffy' it sounds like you're on the right track with your ingredients, I was born & raised in Hawaii - 'live in the Sierras' now, someone mentioned 'Furikake' you ever try 'Tsukudani' its' a little pricy but its' ONO-licious.  I slice up sheets of Nori (I use the Korean-type, roasted in sesame oil w/salt) into thin ribbons, heat your Shoyu in a large pan, add a bit of Mirin (sweet Japanese rice wine), add white sugar to taste (on the sweet-side like Teriyaki), simmer on a low flame for 15minutes & VOILA!  Store in a glass bottle in the fridge, try this in your Chazuke' or use as your filling core in Musubi, or just roll a bit of hot rice into a quarter sheet of Nori with a thin layer of this paste.  Its' really strong! so use sparingly, you can buy it @ Asian markets but homemade is better.

If you can find Okara (the leftover curds from soy milk production) that stuff is great! Google recipes for it.  Also in Asian markets look for 'dehydrated Shiitake mushroom powder' I've always found it 1kilo bags, wait 'til you try this stuff!  You mentioned venison, some find it 'too gamey' I make fried; potstickers, won ton, dim sum, yum cha, with a filling of; ground elk, venison, and coarse ground pork, the pork is to keep it moist (elk has very little marbleing).  Mix together with; diced green onions, water chestnuts, shoyu, & a little grated ginger, add sesame oil, and cornstarch (as a binder), and mix together then stuff your won ton skins.  Korean sauces for; Kal bi, or Koje Jung (like a sweet-sour-spicy Teriyaki-like sauce) is killer with these.  Aloha! & keep up the posts!       

Hmmm, I'll have to try that stuff. I'm going to try nattou this week. I like almost every fermented food I've ever tried, so I expect I'll like it. I'm just going to have it plain with some cooked Japanese rice the first time. I'll let you guys know how it goes on my blog.


Edited to add:

I thought I'd mention last night's dinner. I had Kitsune Soba.
I talked about it here already http://ramenculture.blogspot.com/2010/05/kitsune-soba.html , so as a courtesy to the guys who pay for server space, I won't be re-posting it.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Shanks Mare on May 25, 2010, 09:24:18 pm
No Menudo eh???  Its my favorite "soul" food. ;)
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on August 06, 2010, 08:50:35 pm
Hey booter, ever try Cho Jang sauce?

Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on November 29, 2010, 01:40:41 am
You're welcome.

And yes, my alias comes from the Pearls comic.
I can relate to the trigger happy duck. :laugh:

My favorite pearls toon





Hahaha

O.O"

This sort of posting still exists? すごい。。。
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: Adventurer, Explorer, Inquiring Mind. on January 01, 2012, 06:17:54 pm
Quote
Hmmm...
It sounds like hot-oil to me.
Could I make it with Thai Hot Peppers?
Those are my favorites. Only reason I ask,
is that Cayenne and Japanese peppers aren't hot enough.*






* Yes I'm a chilli head. (A fiery foods enthusiast)


Anyone use habaneros for their hot peppers?  I find that a square inch of habanero can make a gallon of soup burn pretty damn well.  Last batch of chillies I bought were weaker than weak.  The habaneros, on the other hand, must be where all the hot went. 

Glad I finally found the recipe threads.  I'm with you on the cooking since before I could read, and I'm with the disavowed spook that food is part of people's cultural identity.  And there's nothing wrong and lots is right with learning as much as possible and incorporating as much of the flavor of the rest of the world in what one makes at home.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on January 18, 2012, 05:32:50 am
Quote
Hmmm...
It sounds like hot-oil to me.
Could I make it with Thai Hot Peppers?
Those are my favorites. Only reason I ask,
is that Cayenne and Japanese peppers aren't hot enough.*






* Yes I'm a chilli head. (A fiery foods enthusiast)




Anyone use habaneros for their hot peppers?  I find that a square inch of habanero can make a gallon of soup burn pretty damn well.  Last batch of chillies I bought were weaker than weak.  The habaneros, on the other hand, must be where all the hot went. 

Glad I finally found the recipe threads.  I'm with you on the cooking since before I could read, and I'm with the disavowed spook that food is part of people's cultural identity.  And there's nothing wrong and lots is right with learning as much as possible and incorporating as much of the flavor of the rest of the world in what one makes at home.



How's this for world flavor!?


PKL's MILD MASAMAN CURRY (Thai Style Curry)
It's mild so my Granma can eat it. I usually add extra chili to my own bowl. Thai people add so much chili it turns red.  Be sure to write up a will first if you do it the Thai way.

3-4 pounds of skinned and de-boned chicken thighs

1 cup fresh peas (with or without pods)

1 onion, skinned and cut into eighths

1 can of cream of coconut

3/4 of a tall can of coconut water

1 tablespoon of dark fish sauce (I use Filipino style because I think it tastes the best)

1 1/2 tablespoons curry powder (I use McCormick brand for this recipe)

fresh Basil and Cilantro leaves

cooked jasmine rice

Cut into cubes and fry the chicken in a little oil until the fat is melted, remove to a bowl and saute the onions until they are soft. Add in the chicken, peas, coconut cream, coconut water, fish sauce, and curry powder. Stir it well. Cover and cook on Medium-Low heat for 3 hours, stirring occasionally to keep it from burning.

Put rice in bowls, and spoon the curry over it. Then tear up equal amounts of basil and cilantro, and sprinkle atop the curry.

(http://a6.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/224126_1702309969771_1598612117_31479886_3139749_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: DPR 2006 on January 18, 2012, 04:32:14 pm
Looks yummy, man!

Like to ask:  The Thai eateries here in the US advertise their availability of "authentic level" of spice in some of their dishes.  I'm wondering if you've eaten at Thai restaurants here in the US and over there, and can tell me if there's a difference between the two in terms of "authentic level of spice".  At my favorite Thai place in Boise, I can have their curried fried chicken wings (Angel Wing Panang) at what is supposed to be 1-1/2 times authentic level.  The curry is almost orange in color.  I think I'm ready to go 1-3/4 of their authentic level.

If you need a pic, I'm sure I can get one the next time I go there (8 megapixel camera on my iPod touch).
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: gaurdduck on January 18, 2012, 11:35:00 pm
Looks yummy, man!

Like to ask:  The Thai eateries here in the US advertise their availability of "authentic level" of spice in some of their dishes.  I'm wondering if you've eaten at Thai restaurants here in the US and over there, and can tell me if there's a difference between the two in terms of "authentic level of spice".  At my favorite Thai place in Boise, I can have their curried fried chicken wings (Angel Wing Panang) at what is supposed to be 1-1/2 times authentic level.  The curry is almost orange in color.  I think I'm ready to go 1-3/4 of their authentic level.

If you need a pic, I'm sure I can get one the next time I go there (8 megapixel camera on my iPod touch).

I've never been to Thailand. I have some Thai friends that Speak Thai and Japanese... (I speak to them in Japanese.) I made my recipe by modifying a recipe I got thanks to google-translate's Thai setting and a basic search. My Thai friends tell me it's not hot enough even when I add way more chili. I made it not hot and adapted it to use a pre-made curry powder. The recipe called for "vegetables", so I added peas. It was what we had on hand.
Title: Re: Ethnic Soups And Stews (Chilli included)
Post by: DPR 2006 on January 19, 2012, 01:03:08 pm
Wow...looks like I don't quite have the iron stomach I think I do...lol...well, I can still give a surprise to my friends (evil grin).