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Special Interest => Gulching/Self-Sufficiency => FSW => Topic started by: stainzblue on June 24, 2012, 11:01:42 am

Title: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: stainzblue on June 24, 2012, 11:01:42 am
Perhaps off topic but points were touched upon that make me hesitant to move to an unknown region like out West.  I was raised Roman Catholic and my wife was raised Jewish.  We are non-practicing now, but we both believe in something, some kind of order in the universe.  Our practicing acquaintances look down upon us (on some level I'm sure) as lost-souls or heathens.  Our non-practicing acquaintances probably view us as too weak to break the shackles.  But the dogma is the the chain that binds people, not the faith. 

There is nothing I would like more than to break free of the cesspool I live in in the Northeast.  My wife inherited a bit (no a lot actually) of Jewish paranoia and is truly afraid of living somewhere where she will be the only person of Jewish ancestry.  I see some posts here and there about people wanting to move out west seeking to live with other Christians.  When I see that my hackles raise also.  I have been exposed to too many Christians who are truly anything but that in thought and action.  I'm sure some of you know what I mean. However, I also know enough Christians that practice what they preach to keep me grounded in reality.

Her family (including her children from her first marriage) have essentially disowned her for marrying outside the tribe.  On the contrary, my family adore her and she has been considered a daughter without hesitation.  But my family is aging and growing up and moving on.  Each year there is less and less binding us to the land in the Northeast.  Not only do we want to make a change and move amongst more freedom oriented individuals, we need to break away for our sanity.  It would be easy to ge lost out in Wyoming or Montana because there is so much space.  Our trepidations are based more on not being able to blend in now matter how hard we try.  We know people that have moved "down south" and have raised kids there and even have grandchildren, yet they are referred to as "damn yankees."  Similarly, in our town where we spend weekends on our land upstate people like us are referred to as "flat landers." But in the almost four years that I have been visiting (and mostly reading) posts on this forum, I feel like I know so many of you.  Seeing your avatar is like seeing your face.  I have become a better and more grounded person because of this forum.  I yearn to be closer.

Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: MamaLiberty on June 24, 2012, 11:39:42 am
It would be easy to ge lost out in Wyoming or Montana because there is so much space.  Our trepidations are based more on not being able to blend in now matter how hard we try. 

Lots and lots of people have these fears when they come here - and before. It depends a lot on what you mean by "blend in," of course. Nobody is going to actually become THE SAME as those who were born and raised somewhere else, and I can't see why anyone would want to.

The community of people who are gathering here in Wyoming are from all over the country, Canada and a few other places. We share the heritage of non-aggression and self responsibility as the central "glue," if you will. All of the differences are far less important. And sub groups form, dissolve and reform as time goes on. We have a faction pushing for more political action - more than one, actually, for action in different ways. The largest number of FSW folks are neutral, just happy to be here and integrating well with their non FSW neighbors. There are frictions and disagreements, just as with any other gathering of human beings. Most of us feel that makes our life richer and more genuine because we are all free to make voluntary associations, work together with those we like and ignore those we don't like.

And, BTW, we do have a number of Jewish people in the FSW bunch - as well as Catholics and others. Some practice it, and some don't.
So far, it's not been a problem to any of us.

We don't expect to blend like flour and water in pancake batter. We are free to be who we are, and leave others to be free as well. Being the "same as" is not required for life and cooperation, by any means. Living and letting live IS.

Come visit Wyoming. Sit down and talk with some of us.  Seeing is believing.
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: stainzblue on June 24, 2012, 12:25:54 pm
Thanks Mama.  Blending in is a poor term.  I mean we desire to be accepted for who we are.  Fellow adherents of ZAP.  We may look different and sound different but we make good neighbors.  We enjoy the outdoors, dogs, firearms, and a hearty belly-laugh.  She finished her pre-reqs and will be getting her BSN in 2.5 years.  She has an MSW now but as you may know its a tough gig and does not pay well.  Maybe we can look into a good nursing program out there if you know any?
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: MamaLiberty on June 24, 2012, 01:14:53 pm
Thanks Mama.  Blending in is a poor term.  I mean we desire to be accepted for who we are.  Fellow adherents of ZAP.  We may look different and sound different but we make good neighbors.  We enjoy the outdoors, dogs, firearms, and a hearty belly-laugh.  She finished her pre-reqs and will be getting her BSN in 2.5 years.  She has an MSW now but as you may know its a tough gig and does not pay well.  Maybe we can look into a good nursing program out there if you know any?

Being accepted for who and what you are is a foundation principle of FSW. You'd fit right in if you follow the NAP and enjoy voluntary association with like minds.  Here is the FSW story in a nutshell... our official "FAQ": http://www.thementalmilitia.com/forums/index.php?topic=31047.0

At the BSN level and up, there's no reason she can't do the whole thing on line. That's how I worked my master's degree, and that was some time ago. I'm sure it's done little but get better since. She can do the clinical portion in almost any hospital or specialty clinic, usually where you work anyway, and there are some nice places here or just over the line in South Dakota - depending on where you find your sweet spot.  Have her look into it. Sure beats driving all over the place for classroom stuff.
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: stainzblue on June 24, 2012, 06:27:00 pm
Thanks Mama this is helpful information.  But I realize Wyoming is a huge state and I will probably be most comfortable in an area that is verdant like my home state of NY.  On our land in the Catskill Mountains I am familiar with the fauna and flora.  In a few weeks we'll be eating fresh blackberries growing wild all over the place.  There's plenty of trout in the streams and bass in the lakes.  I'd never have to buy firewood as there's plenty of oak and maple.  In a big state like Wyoming I'm hoping there will be areas with the features that I am familiar with, but I'm mostly interested in having to get as much of what I need from the land.  Protein, firewood, some fruit.  Another concern is water.  We have abundant rainfall, and we rely on rainwater for irrigation, hygiene, mixing concrete, etc.

We want to be with people sharing laughs, food, you know, just being good friends and neighbors.  We are social creatures yet also like adequate time to also be alone.  Yet we really don't want to be with people that are exactly like us.  That would be boring.  We just want to be with people that share the same values.  The tragedy of living in the Northeast is that we freak people out more and more with our lifestyle.  We spend a lot of time in a very small cabin.  We use an outdoor shower.  Upstate we are always within reach of a loaded gun, but we can't carry concealed or open except on our own property (and we have a huge problem with that.)  Although we know the problem is really everybody else and not us. But that sounds insane, doesn't it?  Being able to carry 100% of the time is a big deal, at least to me.  My wife loves horses and always dreamed of having one of her own.  Now I know that is one thing that would not only be feasible, but will probably even be practical in a state like Wyoming.
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: socalserf on June 24, 2012, 10:01:09 pm
When I took a trip to Wyoming I met quite a variety of people, Jewish, Atheist, Christians of several types, and
a couple of Orange County CA punk rockers.
The conversations around the campfire were just wonderful!
My impression was that the FSW folks are about as diverse as you can imagine.
Except for my family situation I'd have moved to Newcastle or Casper years ago.
Anyone who thinks they may want to move to Wyoming needs to make a visit and meet the people.
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: MamaLiberty on June 25, 2012, 05:32:10 am
stainzblue, you may have to choose between "verdant" and freedom. Wyoming is a dry, harsh place and more or less hostile to any agriculture beyond cattle, goats and sheep in most places. That's a lot of WHY it is still sparsely populated and the rest of the country pretty much leaves us alone. We produce energy - coal, gas, oil... and trade that to the rest of the country for food and so forth.

The best places for farms and gardens are around Guernsey and the little towns in the South/east part of the state, but they are far from verdant, and they are all too damned close to Colorado for my tastes. There are farming areas around Riverton and the Green River area, but they won't be much like upstate New York, for sure.  Medicine Bow is beautiful, with wide forests, but the elevation is extreme in places.  You'll need greenhouses to actually produce much.  I grow enough in a few raised beds to provide a lot of my vegetables, but one good hailstorm at the wrong time can wipe me out. It's just one of those things.

But we don't have to dance to a million petty "laws," and are absolutely free to go armed, to defend ourselves. Our neighbors mind their own business and think guns are wonderful... everyone has a bunch of them. :) I'm not sure there's anywhere on earth where you can have it all. :)
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: DiabloLoco on June 25, 2012, 06:22:36 am
stainzblue, you may have to choose between "verdant" and freedom. Wyoming is a dry, harsh place and more or less hostile to any agriculture beyond cattle, goats and sheep in most places. That's a lot of WHY it is still sparsely populated and the rest of the country pretty much leaves us alone. We produce energy - coal, gas, oil... and trade that to the rest of the country for food and so forth.

The best places for farms and gardens are around Guernsey and the little towns in the South/east part of the state, but they are far from verdant, and they are all too damned close to Colorado for my tastes. There are farming areas around Riverton and the Green River area, but they won't be much like upstate New York, for sure.  Medicine Bow is beautiful, with wide forests, but the elevation is extreme in places.  You'll need greenhouses to actually produce much.  I grow enough in a few raised beds to provide a lot of my vegetables, but one good hailstorm at the wrong time can wipe me out. It's just one of those things.

But we don't have to dance to a million petty "laws," and are absolutely free to go armed, to defend ourselves. Our neighbors mind their own business and think guns are wonderful... everyone has a bunch of them. :) I'm not sure there's anywhere on earth where you can have it all. :)
It looks like "stainzblue" is having the same dilemma as me, and most likely, MANY upstate NYers. Once you have lived in upstate NY, nothing else quite measures up, in terms of natural resources and beauty. I personally live in the Finger Lakes region. IMO, the most beautiful place on earth. It will be a trade off, I guess. Leave the high taxes and ridiculous laws, but have to settle for a less than ideal location in terms of water, land, game, arable land, wood...etc....etc.....Like I have stated before. I already have a great BOL here in NY. I feel that it is too late to set up a new one in a place that I don't know much about. 2014 is my target date for relocation. Assuming that TEOTWAWKI doesn't happen by then.
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: stainzblue on June 25, 2012, 06:33:32 am
A greenhouse would be an acceptable compromise.  If there is enough water under the ground that will be fine also.  I like my long hot showers.  I guess we are spoiled by being able to heat our homes with free wood and driving down the road for fresh fruit and corn.  But freedom is really what it is all about.  I am choking here with statist regulations.

Hey DL, PM me if you ever want to meet up some time.  I am in Oneonta fairly often and not too far from Binghampton.
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: MamaLiberty on June 25, 2012, 06:58:22 am
Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, of course. I find beauty everywhere I go - except in cities. But some people find more beauty there than in the wilderness. Each to his/her own.

Here is the scene from my back deck:

Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: MamaLiberty on June 25, 2012, 07:06:34 am
Here is a picture from the nearby Black Hills.

Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: stainzblue on June 25, 2012, 07:10:57 am
That is beautiful.  Anyplace devoid of buildings and people, statists in particular, is beautiful.  I would have a good time with my telescope out there for sure.  And my rifle.  How deep did you have to drill for water?
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: MamaLiberty on June 25, 2012, 08:02:02 am
Water law and use can get complicated here. It is a scarce resource, for the most part, and the history of the fights over it go back to the beginning of territorial days. Here is a good webpage to read for the best understanding of the law and customs. http://library.wrds.uwyo.edu/wrp/90-17/90-17.html

I live in a rural area with a co-op for wells and water system. I have no idea how deep the wells are, but my understanding is that it varies greatly across the state. Indeed, it can vary greatly just across town. The water out in my rural area is clear, pure and wonderful. A mile and a half a way, at the edge of town, the water is not nearly as good. They tap a different aquifer.  Wells tend to be deep here, and it is not unusual for people to drill more than once before they get a functioning well. Just one of those things.

There are no large, natural lakes or rivers in Wyoming, and most of the best water resources are claimed and controlled - along with the best land - by either federal or state government. The upside is that they remain uninhabited and, relatively, unspoiled now. After TSHTF, they may well be a very good place to live.

For now, about the only thing in Wyoming that is guaranteed is the wind. Unless, of course, you plan to use wind to generate your power... LOL
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: stainzblue on June 25, 2012, 10:53:16 am
My mantra is NOTHING HAPPENS WITHOUT WATER.  However, hydraulic fracking on the Marcellus shale ridge is putting our water in northeast PA and central NY at risk.  On my land upstate NY we will have to drill 1,000 feet.  I'm on top of a 2,200' hill.  But that will be water as good as anywhere on the planet.  The problem is that it will cost between $10 and $13K to drill the well.  I don't have that kind of money for the time being. 

Out west as long as I can get water Ill make it sweet with prefilters and reverse osmosis.  I'll use the discarded RO water for irrigation assuming I'll not be filtering out heavy metals and chemicals.
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: jamie on June 25, 2012, 04:45:28 pm
 A 1000 ft well only costs 10-13 thousand?  Are you sure of that? 

 I don't think most people born and raised in the east are all that happy in the west.  Just my impression based on some experience.  There is an article written by Mark Spungin, What is a Wyoming person, that might be worth reading. What that article talks about works anywhere in the west.

If you are that kind of person you'll do okay.


 My definition of west is Idaho, Nevada, Wyoming, Colorado,Montana, Arizona and New Mexico. I would consider eastern Oregon and Washington. Utah, the Dakotas and west Texas are  honorable mention.

Spend all four seasons in a place first before relocating. 



As far as the Jewish question I doubt if anyone cares.  You would probably want to avoid some of the Mormon towns though.

Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: stainzblue on June 25, 2012, 07:09:41 pm
Hey Jamie,

Regarding the well, they drill down around 600 feet then they hydraulic fracture the rest of the way.  Thats what they had to do on my closest neighbors propery anyway. 

As for permanent relocation im keeping my options open for now.  Don't have enough money to do anything anyway.  I think we are actually going to visit Wyoming this winter.  That will probably we the toughest season for us to adjust to. 

Having friendly relations with neighbors and community will be the most important factor.  I have honestly come to despise the ignorant liberal and conservative statists on the east coast.

Thanks
SB
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: Adventurer, Explorer, Inquiring Mind. on June 26, 2012, 12:42:50 pm
I know a little bit about the area now, having gone around wyoming and montana and idaho last year looking for a place (south dakota too, come to think of it, too close to Minnesocialist though.)

If you come here in Winter, this whole area, do yourself a favor, bring warm clothes, and stop by a Walmart and get you some car tire chains (those web looking things) or get studded snow tires.  You will not get out of any driveway that isn't inclined downhill otherwise, and you won't get into those driveways without a speedy head start to begin with.  Snow... if you go up past Snowdance (the map calls it Sundance) expect mounds of 4 foot ice and snow up until Late March Early April.  We drove through last March and it scared the poop out of us since our little 1 foot clearance car kept bottoming out in the ice pits in the middle of the roads just off the highway.  The highways are well plowed, and Mama Liberty's place, if you stop by there, is in a gorgeous area.

Wind River Canyon is just downright sexy (and there's no cell signal in the canyon, yay!) but there appears to be huge meth production and the accordant law enforcement psychosis down in Lander.  Guess the natives are stuffing all sorts of NEW things in their peace pipes down on that reservation, eh?  Saw more keystone kars there than anywhere else in the state, even in BIG cities (Lander's probably the size of Newcastle, but they have a LOT of kop kars.)

Speaking of Idaho, as soon as you pass through the Teton pass (After going through Jackson which feels like any coastal college town where nobody's paying attention to where they're going and cross the road without even looking first), Idaho itself seems to be a lot more like Delaware at higher altitude... also LOTS and LOTS of latinos but most of the ones I chatted up seemed the hard working "been here since the times before Guadalupe Hidalgo" types, but that was just my opinion.  Montana is fun, the rents are higher and it gets even more pipe breakingly cold up that way.  They produce lumber on top of energy and such.  They also have more ticks, and wolves, i'm told.

Just remember, there's all sorts of things that can eat you in the northwest, bring a skinning knife and a gun, and if you don't, that's when you'll probably run into something ugly, remember, preparation somehow always prevents having to do what you prepared for.  If you come unarmed, since you are "new yawkaz" and all, don't get stuck in the snow.  They do plow here in the nortwest quite well.  The side roads not so much but the main thoroughfares in towns and the highways were clear from the dakotas to Idaho when my family came lookin'.  If you got one, bring a CB or VHF or a ham rig that can hit those frequencies.

If you stop by Mama Liberty's for awhile, I'll be glad to come down and break bread with you.  (She makes some awesome bread, and her tap water is as delicious as she claims.)  It is a wee bit of a drive, and if you do it in the winter, want to know a week or so in advance.

Enough gushing.  As for road trippin' in the winter, here's my take:

If you drive, my strongest advice is to stay clear of Chicago (go through the mid southern rural area instead) and be EXTRA leery in Indiana.  It isn't Lincoln's Childhood Home as it says on the placards, for nothing.  Been through a few times and saw tons of people being arrested or pulled over each time.  I usually try to have a full tank for the Ohio and Indiana runs so as to never have to stop and to be able to use back roads.  I can give you some fairly clear routes to run on the roads, but my bet is to head through Illinois, west to Iowa, cut straight north to Minnesota and then straight west until Rapid City, SD, from there, you can cut west north of Rapid, through Sundance, Wyoming, which is right off the interstate (I 90) and head south to ML's in Newcastle, or cut straight past Mount Rushmore from Rapid and after some winding windy roads which take two hours to cross 50 miles or so, you'll be right at her front door (more or less.)  Crook county, by the way, is possibly the prettiest area short of going up to Cody/Sheridan/Buffalo up in the Big Horns or all the way to the Rockies.

If you take the southern Nebraska route to ML's you'll be coming up through Lusk, instead and heading north through some pretty desolate area reminiscent of post apocalyptic videogames and movies.  Not quite Mad Max, but possibly Borderlands without the axe wielding cannibal Psychos.  Just coyotes and truck scales, mostly, oh, and wind... and those thrice damned antelope.  Try NOT to drive at night if you can, and if you do, give yourself time, go slow and expect stupid four legged grass eaters of all sorts to try jumping in front of whatever you drive.  Them's good eatin' if you shoot them instead of ramming them.  Expensive game meat if you trade body work and engine work for a few dozen pounds of meat..

Oh, and the best part about Wyoming and Montana?  #1 and #2 states for being least likely to get a traffic ticket, period.  So if you got a broken headlight or tail light, don't fret, look around you, most people, possibly even the cops (as few as they are) probably have two. ;)
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: MamaLiberty on June 26, 2012, 01:01:47 pm
And, as a side note, the driving slower is a great idea any time of year - especially dusk to past dawn. It is most common for vehicles to hit deer and elk - and to a lesser extent, antelope (might be different other places), but you need to be aware of them early because they occasionally will jump out and hit YOU. My neighbor's car was badly mangled because a big elk jumped out and hit her passenger door.  If it had hit the driver's door, it would probably have killed her. She was just so glad she didn't have her daughter with her that night.

Watch carefully, and slow down. If you see ONE, take it for granted that there are others along the road as well... and you may never see them. They are not too bright, and they spook easily sometimes. Or they stand in the road without a care in the world. It's crazy.
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: stainzblue on June 26, 2012, 02:19:51 pm
I don't think most people born and raised in the east are all that happy in the west.  Just my impression based on some experience.  There is an article written by Mark Spungin, What is a Wyoming person, that might be worth reading. What that article talks about works anywhere in the west.
If you are that kind of person you'll do okay.

I have been searching within the forum and the web and have not been able to locate this article.  Can anybody point me in the correct direction?

khyeron - Thanks for the thoughtful reply.  Perhaps not the best time to visit then.  I have spent time up in the Adirondacks of NY during brutal winters, so I'll enjoy my visit more during the springtime I'm sure.  Then again maybe better to just planning on being at next year's Jamboree so I can meet more of you all.  We'll see.  My problem is that I only have 3 vacation days left until January 2013, and I do plan on driving out there. 

Thanks All,
SB
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: Adventurer, Explorer, Inquiring Mind. on June 26, 2012, 03:05:05 pm
Best bet if you want moderately nice weather, is sometime between September and mid October.  First snows (and by that I mean snows, I'm sure you've seen them in New York too) are usually sometime in October, and the first brutal cold hits about mid November.

I imagine there are no "non white" winter solstice holidays out here (whatever you call 'em with your mixed family. :))  To put it plainly, its always a white christmas here... and white easter and white everything.  December to March is when it gets snowy, icy and the snowmobillers ride the hills like their lives depend on it.

If you come in August, its probably still hot.  If you come in December, one thing it won't be is warm.  And if you come in Jan/Feb/March... you're asking for it. :D  It CAN snow until late May, but its mostly hail and random flurries with 80 degree sunlight shortly after you've just run indoors to break out your parka.

I am greatly entertained by this crazy northwestern weather.  Your mileage may vary, but if you can cut it in upstate new york, or even down in buffalo, you'll probably be okay here.  Less suicidal kids than in Buffalo too.  More suicidal four footed grass eaters though... heed well ML's advice on that issue.

Otherwise, like I said, if you're ever up by Mama Liberty's, I'll come down if you drop me a line on here.
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: MamaLiberty on June 26, 2012, 03:09:12 pm
"I have been searching within the forum and the web and have not been able to locate this article.  "

I did an extensive search of the FSW forum and could not find it. I'll ask Mark about it when I see him this weekend. If I remember...

Sorry about that. The search engine at the FSW forum is simply horrible... arggg. I went back through all of Mark's posts and couldn't see it, so no idea now.
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: jamie on June 26, 2012, 06:59:28 pm
I don't think most people born and raised in the east are all that happy in the west.  Just my impression based on some experience.  There is an article written by Mark Spungin, What is a Wyoming person, that might be worth reading. What that article talks about works anywhere in the west.
If you are that kind of person you'll do okay.

I have been searching within the forum and the web and have not been able to locate this article.  Can anybody point me in the correct direction?

khyeron - Thanks for the thoughtful reply.  Perhaps not the best time to visit then.  I have spent time up in the Adirondacks of NY during brutal winters, so I'll enjoy my visit more during the springtime I'm sure.  Then again maybe better to just planning on being at next year's Jamboree so I can meet more of you all.  We'll see.  My problem is that I only have 3 vacation days left until January 2013, and I do plan on driving out there. 

Thanks All,
SB


I don't remember either. I think he wrote it for the Wy Gun Owners Assoc, or whichever one he was associated with. Call him. Google Neither Predator nor Prey. I may have gotten the title a bit wrong. Close though.
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: socalserf on June 27, 2012, 12:24:02 pm
Try this;

http://www.libertystorch.us/_pdf/Issues/issue_9_may_8_2012/LT_Issue_9_Page_19.pdf

And if anyone isn't familiar with Mark Spungin's book, its recommend and fun reading;
http://www.amazon.com/Neither-Predator-Prey-Mark-Spungin/dp/0615224091
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: MamaLiberty on June 27, 2012, 12:37:49 pm
Try this;

http://www.libertystorch.us/_pdf/Issues/issue_9_may_8_2012/LT_Issue_9_Page_19.pdf

Thank you! I should have remembered that. :)
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: socalserf on June 27, 2012, 12:58:17 pm
Your welcome, yes that ones a keeper.
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: Lulu belle on July 02, 2012, 04:34:20 pm
Hi all, what a great article by Mark, I can understand the draw of moving there. My husband and I were at our local pool this weekend and commented how we just didn't fit in with everyone else. Thinking and questioning has given way to materialism and conformity.  Looking forward to finding out more about Wyoming
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: MamaLiberty on July 02, 2012, 04:40:45 pm
Hi all, what a great article by Mark, I can understand the draw of moving there. My husband and I were at our local pool this weekend and commented how we just didn't fit in with everyone else. Thinking and questioning has given way to materialism and conformity.  Looking forward to finding out more about Wyoming

Welcome! I'll be glad to answer any questions, and you'd be more than welcome to introduce yourself at the FSW forum. :)
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: socalserf on July 02, 2012, 11:32:47 pm
Hello Lulu Belle, welcome to the forum.
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: Wyomiles on July 10, 2012, 03:05:54 pm
A few photos to help you get to Wyoming...

Hot showers..Done

http://i549.photobucket.com/albums/ii370/Wyomiles/Gulch/shower2.jpg

Spring water.. Done

http://i549.photobucket.com/albums/ii370/Wyomiles/Gulch/Photo0077.jpg

Nature.. Done

http://i549.photobucket.com/albums/ii370/Wyomiles/Gulch/DSCN0872.jpg

http://i549.photobucket.com/albums/ii370/Wyomiles/Gulch/DSCN0824.jpg

http://i549.photobucket.com/albums/ii370/Wyomiles/Gulch/snowyrangewinter.jpg

Greenhouse.. done

http://i549.photobucket.com/albums/ii370/Wyomiles/Gulch/GHinside.jpg

Come on out ..

http://i549.photobucket.com/albums/ii370/Wyomiles/Gulch/BurntLake.jpg
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: MamaLiberty on July 10, 2012, 03:21:31 pm
Marvelous, Wyomiles. :) Good to see you here. We missed you at the Jamboree!
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: Lonewolf72 on July 10, 2012, 10:55:35 pm
I was born and raised in Minnesota. Really like it here, especially the north country. I have been thinking about moving elsewhere, though, as long as it has water, trees, and winter.

Really liked your pics, Wyomiles. Looks like a place I would enjoy.
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: MamaLiberty on July 11, 2012, 06:17:23 am
I was born and raised in Minnesota. Really like it here, especially the north country. I have been thinking about moving elsewhere, though, as long as it has water, trees, and winter.

Really liked your pics, Wyomiles. Looks like a place I would enjoy.

Well, come on out and visit! Wyoming doesn't have a fraction of the water you see in Minnesota, of course, and most of that is underground, but we like it. Very few mosquitoes!
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: stainzblue on July 11, 2012, 12:55:41 pm
There's a better than 90% chance we are going to be visiting NR Wyoming / Black Hills area The week of Monday August 6th 2012 and leaving Friday night August 10th 2012 IF WE DRIVE.  If we fly, we'd probably arrive Saturday August 4th and depart Sunday August 12th.  My wife and I would love to meet some of you if time permits.  I'll know if that week is approved at work by the end of the day. Any campground and hotel / motel recommendations would be appreciated!

Take Care,
SB

Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: MamaLiberty on July 11, 2012, 01:45:12 pm
There's a better than 90% chance we are going to be visiting NR Wyoming / Black Hills area The week of Monday August 6th 2012 and leaving Friday night August 10th 2012 IF WE DRIVE.  If we fly, we'd probably arrive Saturday August 4th and depart Sunday August 12th.  My wife and I would love to meet some of you if time permits.  I'll know if that week is approved at work by the end of the day. Any campground and hotel / motel recommendations would be appreciated!

Take Care,
SB

We'd love to have you visit. Give me a few days at least and I'll call the clan... We can meet for coffee or a meal. You might want to call much earlier for motel or RV reservations, however. The motels and campgrounds fill fast during Sturgis bike rally. It may already be too late. You can always camp on my land, however. I have water available anyway. :)

FSW friend (not member) still has the Hill Top Motel in Newcastle
Daily, weekly and monthly rates. Some rooms with kitchenette
1121 S. Summit Ave
307-746-4494
Internet/wireless

Pines Motel  (Older, but nice and quiet, not expensive)
248 E. Wentworth St.  (In town Newcastle)
307-746-4334

Weston Inn Motel (in Upton)
1601 Hwy 16
307-468-2401
Don't know anything about this place except that it changed hands and looks good now.

Morgan Motel
205 S. Spokane Ave.
307-746-2715

Roadside Motel
1605 W. Main
307-746-3123

Sage Motel (advertises wireless DSL)
1227 S. Summit Ave.
307-746-2724
Reservations: 877-746-2724

Stardust Motel
833 S. Summit Ave
307-746-4719

Sundowner Inn
451 W. Main
307-746-3344

Camps/RV parks:
Auto Inn Motel and RV park
2503 W. Main
307-746-2734

Fountain Inn
2 Fountain Plaza
307-746-4426

Rim Rock RV & Camp
2206 W. Main St.
307-746-2007

Flying V Cambria Inn & Campground
23726 Hwy 85
307-746-2096
(This is a few miles out of town, a historic site and very popular)

Newcastle Restaurants:

Donna's Mainstreet Diner [great atmosphere - good people)
207 W. Main

El Michoacano (Mexican) [I have not eaten here]
2 Fountain Plaza (next to Fountain Inn)

Hi-16 Drive in (and indoor dining room) [Food ok]
2951 W. Main

Some "fast food"

Subway
Pizza Hut
Taco John's
The "Hop"
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: stainzblue on July 11, 2012, 03:15:05 pm
Thanks Mama.  I'll get crackalackin' to try to find a room tonight.  I did get the approval for that week from work.  Just have to check to see if I can get reasonable flights or if I'll be driving.  Didn't think at all about Sturgis...  Hope I can get a room!  Appreciate the offer to camp on your land!  :wub:

Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: stainzblue on July 18, 2012, 10:22:41 pm
A few photos to help you get to Wyoming...
Hot showers..Done

Howdy Wyomiles.  In haste I passed by your post and just looked at your pictures.  Awesome.

We are kindred spirits.  I'm positing (at least going to try, I uploaded but it won't show in preview..) a pic of our shower up on our land in the (hills to you, mountains to us flatlanders...)

The image is 48KB, so dialups should not be too bad.  We have the same shower cept we didn't get around to that whole privacy thing.  I poured a slab and we stand on a teak grate.

Nice to meet you and hope to see you in in a couple of weeks.  Yay!

SB
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: Wyomiles on July 21, 2012, 09:24:21 am
Thanks Mama, we miss you too. Been real busy at the gulch.

Lonewolf, there are lots of nice places in Wyoming. We have had a couple of different places and have been lucky enough to be in the mountains with water each time.

SB, I feel connected to quite a few folks here at the mental militia and have met a few good ones through the free state Wyoming project too. 
I only put up the tarps to keep from suprising the neighbors. :rolleyes: Nothing like a hot shower after a day of working in the woods. Do you have any trouble keeping your shower unit lit? Ours seems to blow out when the wind is blowing so I have built a wooden box around the sides to try and stop that.

Enjoy your trip to NE Wyoming. We are actually in the southern half of the state so probably won't get to meet you this time.
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: MamaLiberty on July 21, 2012, 09:52:17 am
Thanks Mama, we miss you too. Been real busy at the gulch.

I do understand. :) And if the Jamboree wasn't held practically next door to me here, I wouldn't likely get to go either. But I do hope you can come next time. It's shaping up to be very interesting.
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: Lonewolf72 on July 22, 2012, 12:57:36 am
Hmmmm....Mountains, water, timber, and a little bit more free. Sounds better all the time.
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: stainzblue on July 22, 2012, 01:05:46 pm
I only put up the tarps to keep from suprising the neighbors. :rolleyes:

Our nearest neighbor would not be able to see us in the shower.  That would really scare the heck out of them.  :laugh:  When our kid is with us we hang tarps up.

Quote
Nothing like a hot shower after a day of working in the woods. Do you have any trouble keeping your shower unit lit? Ours seems to blow out when the wind is blowing so I have built a wooden box around the sides to try and stop that.

Amen.  I could not do it without that shower!  We don't have a problem with the wind blowing it out, but then again, a lot of trees there block the wind.  And we don't have the winds that you folks in Wyoming supposedly have.  The shower unit is only a year old.  And I packed it for winter storage, so it's only exposed to the elements from April to October. 

Since I lug my own water, a 2.5 gallon shower is what I would call a long, hot shower.

Quote
Enjoy your trip to NE Wyoming. We are actually in the southern half of the state so probably won't get to meet you this time.

Thanks.   Maybe we can meet at the next Jamboree? 

PS, That looks like a nice Working Line German Shepherd Dog in your Atavar.  Is it so?  Then we are truly kindred spirits. 


Edit: Typo
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: Wyomiles on July 27, 2012, 10:43:26 pm
The pup in my avatar belonged to my wife when we married. He was a husky shepard mix. Great dog, he has been gone about 15 years now. We then picked up a female american german shepard who left us 2 years ago. Both are missed by thier family.
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: stainzblue on August 03, 2012, 09:54:20 am
Growing up my dad liked the show line Shepherds.  Three of them and each only made it 10 years with those hips.  Heartbreaking.  I broke tradition with mine and got a working line shepherd from East German / Czech bloodlines.  But he has questionable hips.  It's a crap shoot with the big popular breeds.  I think my next dog is going to be healthy rescue dog.  But the Shepherds are just so dang smart and versatile.  My dog can track, protect, and just be a great big mush too. 
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: MamaLiberty on August 03, 2012, 10:51:30 am
Almost all the dogs available around here are some version of the Australian Shepherd or various other versions of cattle dogs. They are bright, healthy and intelligent, just far too active and aggressive for me to consider. There are various wimpy "lap dog" things around for sale, occasionally, but they don't appeal to me either. I want a Welsh Corgi.   The "rescue" kind cost as much as a purebred pup. I just don't have that kind of money. sigh
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: socalserf on August 03, 2012, 01:35:32 pm
Growing up my dad liked the show line Shepherds.  Three of them and each only made it 10 years with those hips.  Heartbreaking.  I broke tradition with mine and got a working line shepherd from East German / Czech bloodlines.  But he has questionable hips.  It's a crap shoot with the big popular breeds.  I think my next dog is going to be healthy rescue dog.  But the Shepherds are just so dang smart and versatile.  My dog can track, protect, and just be a great big mush too.
You can actually find blood lines of shepherds that are guaranteed against hip dysplasia.
We got one, and he is a very fine dog indeed. Unfortunately he is now suffering from Degenerative Myelopathy.
Yep,that is just as heart breaking. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canine_degenerative_myelopathy
We find out now that you can screen for this too.
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: Moonbeam on August 03, 2012, 02:31:25 pm
Thread hijack: I've been researching and thinking about getting a German Shepherd. Lately, I'm leaning towards getting a mix breed from the shelter.

I think I'll start a thread....

</hijack>
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: Adventurer, Explorer, Inquiring Mind. on August 03, 2012, 02:39:59 pm
Almost all the dogs available around here are some version of the Australian Shepherd or various other versions of cattle dogs. They are bright, healthy and intelligent, just far too active and aggressive for me to consider. There are various wimpy "lap dog" things around for sale, occasionally, but they don't appeal to me either. I want a Welsh Corgi.   The "rescue" kind cost as much as a purebred pup. I just don't have that kind of money. sigh

Yeah, see, I LOVE active, bright, aggressive nippers.  My current is only part cattle dog, and yet I get a few scratches and scars from him every time we wrestle good and hard.  And it keeps us both healthy enough not to grow old and die and stuff. :P
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: MamaLiberty on August 03, 2012, 02:46:59 pm
Yeah, see, I LOVE active, bright, aggressive nippers.  My current is only part cattle dog, and yet I get a few scratches and scars from him every time we wrestle good and hard.  And it keeps us both healthy enough not to grow old and die and stuff. :P

Well, love them or not, I'm already too old to wrestle anything... and can't afford to hire someone to take a dog on a ten mile run each day. :) To each his/her own.

Good to see you back!!! Missed you.
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: DiabloLoco on August 21, 2012, 04:02:20 pm
Not sure if this is the right place to post this, but I thought that ML would be interested.

Feds prepare to end wolf protections in Wyoming

http://www.ktvb.com/news/regional/Feds-prepare-to-end-wolf-protections-in-Wyoming-166173986.html

Quote
CHEYENNE, Wyo. -- The federal government plans to announce an end to protections for wolves in Wyoming later this month.
Spokesmen from some environmental groups say they plan to review the final wolf delisting rule carefully when it's issued Aug. 31. They say legal challenges are likely over the state's plan to classify wolves as predators that can be shot on sight in most areas.
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: MamaLiberty on August 21, 2012, 04:10:11 pm
Not sure if this is the right place to post this, but I thought that ML would be interested.

Feds prepare to end wolf protections in Wyoming

Yes, many of us are watching that carefully.

Of course... some just SSS...
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: MamaLiberty on December 23, 2012, 10:52:07 am
Another good reason to come to Wyoming.

Wyo. may loosen gun laws  http://www.wyomingnews.com/articles/2012/12/23/news/19local_12-23-12.prt

While the rest of the nation debates tighter gun-control restrictions following the Sandy Hook shooting, proposals are looming for the upcoming Legislative session that would do just the opposite.

By Trevor Brown
tbrown@wyomingnews.com

CHEYENNE -- Proposals to loosen gun regulations are likely to emerge when the Legislature convenes in early January.

The Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting is spurring national leaders to call for tighter federal gun-control laws. But several Wyoming legislators say they are planning to sponsor legislation that would do the opposite.

Incoming Speaker of the House Tom Lubnau, R-Gillette, said he is drafting legislation that would end gun-free zones.

He said he still is working on the details and the bill has not yet been filed. But he said it could include allowing teachers and other staff to have guns in schools.
Title: Re: Questions about Wyoming
Post by: MamaLiberty on December 30, 2012, 01:35:47 pm
Excellent post by someone planning to move to Wyoming.

http://www.fundamentalsoffreedom.com/fswforum/index.php?topic=14474.0;topicseen
 Come to terms with the idea of moving to Wyoming.  There are precious few guarantees in life, but here are a couple that will apply to this move: a) Wyoming is not a utopia.  It has its problems.  It has bad weather.  It has horrific wind.  It can be difficult to find a good job.  It is populated by its share of jerks, low-lifes, and crazies.  It is not a freehold.  b) land and housing are expensive relative to the rest of the country.  c) You will never have enough money as long as you define your life's satisfaction by a monetary standard (besides, dollars aren't really money anyway). d) Federal law will reach you in Wyoming. e) It is not easy to live in Wyoming for everyone.  f) If your spouse is against the move, your quality of life will suffer.  g) If our society crumbles as most of us believe it will, or if "civil war" breaks out, life in Wyoming will be more difficult, not easier.  h) understand how difficult it is to be "self-sufficient."  It takes a lot of labor to provide for yourself to any significant degree.  A patch of veggies will not see you through the winter.  You may well trade a basically easy life (even in hard times) for a life of physically demanding and emotionally draining hard work, but it will be your life to live - not the government's.