The Mental Militia Forums

Special Interest => Home Schooling => Topic started by: Felinenation on May 22, 2014, 02:44:39 pm

Title: Homeschooling success story
Post by: Felinenation on May 22, 2014, 02:44:39 pm
The cover of the June 2014 Popular Mechanics magazine features Palmer Luckey.  He is an inventor, age 21.  He was homeschooled.  He recently sold his virtual reality technology to Facebook for $2 Billion.
Title: Re: Homeschooling success story
Post by: knobster on May 23, 2014, 05:41:54 am
But... but... he didn't go to a 'real' school!  He doesn't have any social skills.  How did he know how to interact with anyone?  What's going on?!?!?!

Thanks for sharing.  I'll send this story on to my wife who homeschools our 3 children.  Perhaps she'll mention this to her father who still thinks she's not doing what's best for his grandchildren.
Title: Re: Homeschooling success story
Post by: NuclearDruid on June 04, 2014, 07:32:24 pm
The inventor of Oculus Rift technology was also homeschooled.

http://kotaku.com/the-prophet-of-virtual-reality-1545804458

ND

Title: Re: Homeschooling success story
Post by: Rarick on June 06, 2014, 05:42:24 am
That's what Kitty said oh great green radiance.........
Title: Re: Homeschooling success story
Post by: DiabloLoco on September 09, 2016, 06:56:42 pm
This is not a Homeschooling success story. This is a story about how government indoctrination can be overcome. How your minions can still be extremely intelligent and freedom minded while attending public schools. I know that it can happen.

How? Well......#1......Me. I attended public schools. #2.......My minions. We just got back their State test results from last school year (May), and even with all the Common-Core bullshit and dumbing down that they have to go through, both minions scored in the 99 percentile for their age group in both Math and Reading. I think that the 99 percentile thing is crap. It should read 100, as it showed that neither of them got a single question wrong on either test.

So......for those of you that can't homeschool because both parents need to work, there is light at the end of the tunnel. You just have to put in that extra effort with your kids.

Would homeschooling be better? Well, sure! But if you can't, that doesn't mean that you're a bad parent, and it sure as heck doesn't mean that you can't raise well adjusted, intelligent, freedom oriented children.
Title: Re: Homeschooling success story
Post by: MamaLiberty on September 10, 2016, 05:37:01 am
That's wonderful, DL. Congratulations, and I don't at all mean to diminish that very real accomplishment.  I simply wonder what the "99 percentile for their age group in both Math and Reading" means these days. Have you compared it to what the criteria was 50 years ago? A hundred years ago? We've all said that the requirements have been "dumbed down" seriously over the years, quite aside from all of the BS revisionist "history" and other subjects. Did they have to suffer through the "new math" nonsense? My grandsons did, and it took my son literally years to get that out of their systems and start to learn real math.

One of the 8th grade final tests from a hundred years ago.  http://grandfather-economic-report.com/1895-test.htm

What would a truly comprehensive test for 8th graders look like now?
Title: Re: Homeschooling success story
Post by: DiabloLoco on September 10, 2016, 08:03:32 am
That's wonderful, DL. Congratulations, and I don't at all mean to diminish that very real accomplishment.  I simply wonder what the "99 percentile for their age group in both Math and Reading" means these days.

I have wondered the same, but I have no way of knowing. All I know is that it's a statewide test. The 99% is saying that they both scored better on that test than every single child of their age (that also took the test) in the entire state (NY), not just the district.
Title: Re: Homeschooling success story
Post by: MamaLiberty on September 10, 2016, 08:55:02 am
I have wondered the same, but I have no way of knowing.

Take a look at the "test" at that link. I don't think I could pass it right now myself. :) I've forgotten at least half of what I used to know. sigh  And we were already getting fed a lot of nonsense by the time I graduated high school in 1964.
Title: Re: Homeschooling success story
Post by: Rarick on October 30, 2016, 01:20:55 pm
THAT is one hell of a test.  I am certain I could pass it, but not with the ease I am used to passing such tests.
Title: Re: Homeschooling success story
Post by: DiabloLoco on October 30, 2016, 02:04:50 pm
THAT is one hell of a test.  I am certain I could pass it, but not with the ease I am used to passing such tests.
You gotta remember that test was designed by the community in which it was administered (which is how is still SHOULD be). Long before the (unconstitutional) National Department of Education took over and initiated the "stupidification" of America.
Title: Re: Homeschooling success story
Post by: slidemansailor on October 31, 2016, 10:02:49 am
Our kids moved into the neighborhood with four of our grandkids.  They have been homeschooling, and are continuing while riding the fence about putting their kids into the very small public school here in the netherwoods.  I am encouraging the homeschooling option without being judgmental if the decision goes the other way.

I have invested significantly in used musical instruments, and am giving music lessons to mom, dad, and the two older kids (11, 13) though I am woefully underqualified.  Mrs Sailor and my mom (now GG) are both jumping in with keyboard lessons for the young girls (4, 11).  This is turning out as well as I could have hoped for with their family practicing music together... and the older generation being involved too.

The two younger ones (6, 4) are not in a mood to be left behind and are demanding turns on Mom's euphonium and big brother's trumpet.  I am adding a couple more student horns to make sure Mom gets fair time on her new venture... and the little ones can grow at their own pace.

Used instruments are surprisingly affordable ($75-$150). Ones with better long-term playing potential cost more , but I found some deals because they needed service ($250-$800), and happily I was able to blunder my way through the service to nice playing instruments.

It excites me that the young family is playing together; growing together musically. It excites Mom and Dad that their 13-year-old has a musical outlet as he seems to be developing a bit of the surly when he doesn't play music. He is stretching out and "doubling" on the trumpet which he has had a little public school experience and the trombone which is new to him, but great new fun.

Music operates in a segment of the mind that little else works. It makes a big difference in overall development and should be part of your homeschooling if you can figure a way to pull it off.
Title: Re: Homeschooling success story
Post by: MamaLiberty on October 31, 2016, 10:25:28 am
Remember that the voice is also a musical instrument. Even if physical instruments are not available, or nobody knows how to play them, they can still sing. :)
Title: Re: Homeschooling success story
Post by: Rarick on February 05, 2017, 12:40:55 am
Acapella.  There are acapella groups out there that are good enough that you do not realize that they are not accompanied by instruments.  They are on u-toob and several other sites like it.
Title: Re: Homeschooling success story
Post by: knobster on February 06, 2017, 07:35:38 am
Remember that the voice is also a musical instrument. Even if physical instruments are not available, or nobody knows how to play them, they can still sing. :)

Apparently you've never heard me sing.  It is a far cry from 'musical' unless you consider the sound a dying bull makes inside a grain elevator...
Title: Re: Homeschooling success story
Post by: MamaLiberty on February 06, 2017, 07:51:53 am
Apparently you've never heard me sing.  It is a far cry from 'musical' unless you consider the sound a dying bull makes inside a grain elevator...

Oh, knobster. My late husband loved to sing in the shower. Loudly. He often sounded like a room full of wounded animals, but the exercise made him very happy (and we didn't have close neighbors). I never minded the noise, since it was making him happy.

He died in my arms (heart attack) 32 years ago.  I wish I could hear him singing in the shower. It is music to my ears even to remember.

If it makes you happy, sing. :)
Title: Re: Homeschooling success story
Post by: knobster on February 06, 2017, 12:49:31 pm
Oh, knobster. My late husband loved to sing in the shower. Loudly. He often sounded like a room full of wounded animals, but the exercise made him very happy (and we didn't have close neighbors). I never minded the noise, since it was making him happy.

He died in my arms (heart attack) 32 years ago.  I wish I could hear him singing in the shower. It is music to my ears even to remember.

If it makes you happy, sing. :)
Well I'm glad I could bring a smile to your face at the memory of him at least!