The Mental Militia Forums

Special Interest => Money, Commerce, and Taxation => Topic started by: DiabloLoco on April 11, 2016, 08:33:20 am

Title: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on April 11, 2016, 08:33:20 am
As many here know, I collect coins. I'm wondering if there are any other fellow numismatists here at TMM? I'd love to touch base and be able to share news from the coin world, discuss great finds/deals, and perhaps do some trading!

I have a feeling that any responses here will be from non-collectors spouting snark and nonsense, but I'm feeling optimistic.....Anybody interested?

(http://1010wcsi.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/coins.jpg)
(http://lowres.jantoo.com/leisure-hobbies-numismatics-collectible-auction-collect-cheapskate-75030978_low.jpg)
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: FDD on April 11, 2016, 09:31:57 am
not really a coin collector, but am always willing to learn something new.
got some old coin from way back when.
more into PM now, but am open to new things.
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Jake on April 11, 2016, 09:54:37 am
I found a 1921 D Mercury dime on the ground and was going to buy an ice cream cone with it.  That was a few years ago.  I sold that dime on Ebay for $128 three years ago.
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on April 11, 2016, 03:11:16 pm
not really a coin collector, but am always willing to learn something new.
got some old coin from way back when.
more into PM now, but am open to new things.

What is the coin? Year? Mint mark? Condition? I could appraise it for you.

I found a 1921 D Mercury dime on the ground and was going to buy an ice cream cone with it.  That was a few years ago.  I sold that dime on Ebay for $128 three years ago.


That's a great find! 21d is a key date for the Mercs. Too bad it wasn't a 16d! Would have been a heck of a lot more than $128! Do you know what the grade of the coin was?
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on April 11, 2016, 03:17:10 pm
Well....Julio, how about a coin that marries the two? A numismatic bullion coin! Only 125,000 will be minted. This coin will increase in numismatic value much more than a 1/10oz. Gold Eagle will. :mellow:

U.S. Mint Shares Pics and Mintage Info on Upcoming Gold Mercury Dimes
http://news.coinupdate.com/u-s-mint-shares-pics-and-mintage-info-on-upcoming-gold-mercury-dimes/

(http://news.coinupdate.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/16xb_cWIDE.jpg)

Quote
The Winged Liberty dime was designed by Adolph A. Weinmen. It’s obverse features an image of Liberty facing left and wearing a winged cap; Liberty’s resemblance in this design to the Roman god, Mercury, led to the issue being nicknamed the “Mercury dime.” Inscribed along the rim are LIBERTY, IN GOD WE TRUST, the artist’s initials, and 2016.

The coin’s reverse bears an illustration of a Roman fasces with an olive branch, along with the inscriptions UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, E PLURIBUS UNUM, ONE DIME, the West Point Mint’s “W” mint mark, AU 24K, and the item’s weight, 1/10 OZ.


The gold Mercury dime will be the first of three reissues celebrating the centenary of the first appearance of three classic circulation coins. The 1916 dime, quarter, and half dollar — originally 90% silver and bearing designs known as “Winged Liberty,” “Standing Liberty,” and “Walking Liberty,” respectively — will all be issued in .9999 24-karat gold this year.

The reissues will vary in size, roughly in accordance with the dimensions of the original pieces. As noted above, the Mercury dime will come as a 1/10 oz. piece, while the Standing Liberty quarter will be 1/4 oz. and the Walking Liberty half dollar will be the largest at 1/2 oz. Release dates for the latter two issues have yet to be determined.

I really want at least one of each! The coins first issued in 1916 are my 3 favorite US coin designs. Back before they started putting butthole politicians on them. :laugh: Well....except for Lincoln (1909), but don't get me started on THAT subject! :rolleyes:
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on April 11, 2016, 03:18:54 pm
Speaking of Mercury dimes, did you know that there is a fascist symbol on it? The fasces. A bundle of rods with an axe protruding from the center. The symbol originated from the Etruscan's, but was used by Rome as well. I think that it was used for the reverse of the Mercury dime to represent the power of the Supreme Court/Judicial Branch.

(http://d3jsg6v4h2swe0.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/cm1916b.jpg?867006)

Even though the design was adopted well before the rise of Mussolini and the "Fascisti", it cause quite a stir in the US.

Our fascist dime
http://www.numismaticnews.net/flipside/our-fascist-dime

Quote
In 1936, a letter sent to the chairman of the House Committee on Coinage, Weights and Measures (reproduced in the October 1936 issue of The Numcm1916A.jpgismatist, the monthly publication of the American Numismatic Association), warned that:

“The fasces, which is the emblem of Fascism, the present form of government in Italy, strangely enough appears on the reverse of our dime. Although it appears on this coinage as early as 1916, and although it was not adopted by Mussolini and his followers until 1919, future world historians delving into the past through numismatics, as is often the custom, are liable to draw the conclusion that the United States and not Italy was the birthplace of fascism.

However, even with the uproar, the design was not changed until 1946. The design is still with us today. FDR, the bastard that started the income tax. :angry4:

Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: FDD on April 11, 2016, 03:54:26 pm
hmmm, may have to get one of these dimes if they ever show up.
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Jake on April 12, 2016, 12:46:18 am
That's a great find! 21d is a key date for the Mercs. Too bad it wasn't a 16d! Would have been a heck of a lot more than $128! Do you know what the grade of the coin was?
There were at least 2 and barely 3 lines in the bindings of the wheat (or sticks) on the back.  It also had a die crack or blemish that was under the date which were on others of that mint but clearer.  If I could find a picture, I would share.  I found it in the mid 60's
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on April 20, 2016, 07:21:57 pm
Thought that I would share a REALLY useful tool to help grade numismatic coins. Coin prices can vary wildly. Certain coins can increase in value by thousands of dollars by being just one single grade higher. For example, an 1893 Morgan dollar graded MS64 is valued over $2000, but the same coin in an MS65 is worth over $6000!

The useful tool that I am sharing is called "Photograde". It is a service provided by PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service). It shows high quality photos of the obverse (front) of the coin and the reverse (back) of the coin in every grade, from 0-70. Simply click the type of coin you are looking up, then scan the photos until you find one that looks exactly like your coin.

Next, once you have graded your coin you can then go to ebay and check the "sold" listings for that particular coin in that exact grade. This will give you a pretty accurate fair-market value. When you decide to sell the coin, you will be armed with this knowledge and can make sure that you don't get hosed by the buyer.

There is MUCH more to grading coins, but "Photograde" is a quick, fairly accurate way to cheat a bit. :mellow:


http://www.pcgs.com/photograde/

(http://www.pcgs.com/images/photograde/250/Morgan-65o.jpg)
                     MS65
(http://www.pcgs.com/images/photograde/250/Morgan-65r.jpg)
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: FDD on April 20, 2016, 08:02:41 pm
Well....Julio, how about a coin that marries the two? A numismatic bullion coin! Only 125,000 will be minted. This coin will increase in numismatic value much more than a 1/10oz. Gold Eagle will. :mellow:

U.S. Mint Shares Pics and Mintage Info on Upcoming Gold Mercury Dimes
http://news.coinupdate.com/u-s-mint-shares-pics-and-mintage-info-on-upcoming-gold-mercury-dimes/

(http://news.coinupdate.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/16xb_cWIDE.jpg)

Quote
The Winged Liberty dime was designed by Adolph A. Weinmen. It’s obverse features an image of Liberty facing left and wearing a winged cap; Liberty’s resemblance in this design to the Roman god, Mercury, led to the issue being nicknamed the “Mercury dime.” Inscribed along the rim are LIBERTY, IN GOD WE TRUST, the artist’s initials, and 2016.

The coin’s reverse bears an illustration of a Roman fasces with an olive branch, along with the inscriptions UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, E PLURIBUS UNUM, ONE DIME, the West Point Mint’s “W” mint mark, AU 24K, and the item’s weight, 1/10 OZ.


The gold Mercury dime will be the first of three reissues celebrating the centenary of the first appearance of three classic circulation coins. The 1916 dime, quarter, and half dollar — originally 90% silver and bearing designs known as “Winged Liberty,” “Standing Liberty,” and “Walking Liberty,” respectively — will all be issued in .9999 24-karat gold this year.

The reissues will vary in size, roughly in accordance with the dimensions of the original pieces. As noted above, the Mercury dime will come as a 1/10 oz. piece, while the Standing Liberty quarter will be 1/4 oz. and the Walking Liberty half dollar will be the largest at 1/2 oz. Release dates for the latter two issues have yet to be determined.

I really want at least one of each! The coins first issued in 1916 are my 3 favorite US coin designs. Back before they started putting butthole politicians on them. :laugh: Well....except for Lincoln (1909), but don't get me started on THAT subject! :rolleyes:

I asked my guy here about if he was going to get any.
He said he was going to try, and that it would sell out in a matter of seconds when it went up for sale.
He thinks that they will go for over $250 a coin, that is like double the price for a 1/10 oz gold round.
WOW so I will see if he got any this weekend
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Tahn L. on April 20, 2016, 08:08:04 pm
Thanks DiabloLoco !

  I have the Photograde book but did not realize it was online. I am sooo old and only a F/VF. :ph34r:
 If a coin is a rare one, I recommend a USGS certificate.
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on April 20, 2016, 08:24:43 pm
Thanks DiabloLoco !

  I have the Photograde book but did not realize it was online. I am sooo old and only a F/VF. :ph34r:
 If a coin is a rare one, I recommend a USGS certificate.
NGC, PCGS, and ANACS are the most respected grading companies today. You don't get a certificate. You get your coin "slabbed". PCGS is the most prestigious grading company right now.

(http://coinauctionshelp.com/Coin_Help_Blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/secureplusimg-3.thumbnail.jpg)



BTW- Being an F-12 or a VF-20 is a lot better than being an AG-3! :laugh:
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Tahn L. on April 20, 2016, 08:43:32 pm
Thanks again for the update and the compliment.
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Jake on April 21, 2016, 12:17:07 am
Speaking of Mercury dimes, did you know that there is a fascist symbol on it? The fasces. A bundle of rods with an axe protruding from the center. The symbol originated from the Etruscan's, but was used by Rome as well. I think that it was used for the reverse of the Mercury dime to represent the power of the Supreme Court/Judicial Branch.



Even though the design was adopted well before the rise of Mussolini and the "Fascisti", it cause quite a stir in the US.

Our fascist dime
http://www.numismaticnews.net/flipside/our-fascist-dime

Quote
In 1936, a letter sent to the chairman of the House Committee on Coinage, Weights and Measures (reproduced in the October 1936 issue of The Numcm1916A.jpgismatist, the monthly publication of the American Numismatic Association), warned that:

“The fasces, which is the emblem of Fascism, the present form of government in Italy, strangely enough appears on the reverse of our dime. Although it appears on this coinage as early as 1916, and although it was not adopted by Mussolini and his followers until 1919, future world historians delving into the past through numismatics, as is often the custom, are liable to draw the conclusion that the United States and not Italy was the birthplace of fascism.

However, even with the uproar, the design was not changed until 1946. The design is still with us today. FDR, the bastard that started the income tax. :angry4:

The wrappings of the rods, I was told, was representing binding of the folks and the axe head was Roman as enforcer. . .
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Bill St. Clair on April 21, 2016, 09:16:26 am
Just thought of this. Why has nobody minted gold coins containing a one-letter change to the motto printed on US coins:

In Gold We Trust

Apparently, it's not a new idea: https://www.google.com/search?q=%22in+gold+we+trust%22
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: FDD on April 23, 2016, 07:53:56 pm
The new penny

Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Splash22 on April 23, 2016, 08:06:04 pm
DL, In my effort to collect each coin .1, .5, .10, .25 for each son in the year's they were born, I have started grabbing old silver and swapping for recently minted. I found a 1941 quarter a few days ago, that's the oldest so far.

I look for old "buckwheat" pennies too.
I am saddened by the fact that now when you drop a coin, it sounds like a button!
~S
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on April 23, 2016, 08:16:54 pm
DL, In my effort to collect each coin .1, .5, .10, .25 for each son in the year's they were born, I have started grabbing old silver and swapping for recently minted. I found a 1941 quarter a few days ago, that's the oldest so far.
Sweet! The last silver coin I found in general circulation was about a month ago. It was a 1937 Mercury Dime. I was very surprised to find it, since it is such an outdated design. It was a pretty dark coin. That coupled with the small size of the coin may have contributed to it finding it's way to me. (I have EXCELLENT vision) :mellow:

Quote
I look for old "buckwheat" pennies too.

I have 3 complete "wheatie" collections. One for me, and one for each of my minions to inherit. The 1909s VDB is the main key date. They don't come cheap. :icon_pale:
Quote
I am saddened by the fact that now when you drop a coin, it sounds like a button!
~S
Oh yeah....Nothing like the satisfying "ring" of a silver coin. Try dumping out a $100 face value bag sometime. Oh yeah.....that's the stuff!! :laugh:
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Splash22 on April 23, 2016, 08:57:37 pm
I am a bit iffy on the polishing thing for coins...I've read both you should and shouldn't polish old coins...safest, least obtrusive way?what sez youz?
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on April 24, 2016, 05:36:18 am
I am a bit iffy on the polishing thing for coins...I've read both you should and shouldn't polish old coins...safest, least obtrusive way?what sez youz?
What sez meez?

NO!!!! NEVER POLISH A COIN!!! BLASPHEMY!!!

Ok..... Sorry.....Had to get that out.

Polishing a coin ruins it. No self respecting coin collector even LOOKS at polished coins. Polishing a coin can turn a $1000 coin into a coin that you may as well use at the local 7/11. Grading companies won't even grade them. They will put them in a slab and label them "genuine". Which means "Yes, this is a real coin, not a fake, but has been cleaned."

Think of any other antique. Furniture for example. Its always worth more if it has it's original finish and patina. You get a sense of what it has been through. Its history. It's the same for coins. Holding a coin minted in....let's say 1842. You get that sense of wonder......Like, WOW! Imagine how many people have held this coin. It's seen war, booms, busts, and it's still around. Amazing!
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Splash22 on April 24, 2016, 05:55:18 am
Gotcha.
And the ones that have the date obliterated? How do you get to see it?
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on April 24, 2016, 06:15:08 am
Gotcha.
And the ones that have the date obliterated? How do you get to see it?
That is an exception to the rule. Depends on the coin. Sometimes (albeit rarely), a year can be determined with other factors such as variations in the design. If you absolutely HAVE to clean a coin, do so with a very mild soap and water, using a Q-tip. Use very light pressure and clean by spinning the Q-tip. 

If the date is obliterated due to wear, there is no getting it back. It's gone.

The exception to THAT rule would be nickels. Usually Buffalo nickels. Buffalo nickels were a very poor design. The date was the highest point on the coin and therefore, the first part of the design to be lost to wear. The date can be brought back with a simple vinegar solution. It may take a few days of soaking, but the date will be legible.

BTW, the vinegar fix also completely ruins the value of the coin.
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Splash22 on April 24, 2016, 06:25:51 am
Gotcha.
And the ones that have the date obliterated? How do you get to see it?
That is an exception to the rule. Depends on the coin. Sometimes (albeit rarely), a year can be determined with other factors such as variations in the design. If you absolutely HAVE to clean a coin, do so with a very mild soap and water, using a Q-tip. Use very light pressure and clean by spinning the Q-tip.

Soo....a good dosing of Gorham's silver polish, is out then...?
Kidding!
Seems the pennies get the most oxidation from their copper.
When I found my 1941 quarter, I did think of the things you mentioned...who had it, what was going on in the world, what did they buy, how many pockets it sat in...how much Tommy Dorsey did it hear? WWII was on.......
How cool would it be to regress a coin to glean all that info! Now there's a good sci-movie script YOU could write!
Holding the coin, you'd get to experience all the places it's been!
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Bill St. Clair on April 24, 2016, 10:20:14 am
I carry a one ounce US Silver Eagle around in my change holder, as a reminder of what real money looks like. It occasionally gets tarnished, and I give it a quick wipe with some silver polish. But I'm using it as bullion, not for numismatic value.
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on April 24, 2016, 10:37:48 am

When I found my 1941 quarter, I did think of the things you mentioned...who had it, what was going on in the world, what did they buy, how many pockets it sat in...how much Tommy Dorsey did it hear? WWII was on.......
How cool would it be to regress a coin to glean all that info! Now there's a good sci-movie script YOU could write!
Holding the coin, you'd get to experience all the places it's been!
Hmmmm......That is an interesting premise! If I had the time, I would definitely write that.
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on April 24, 2016, 10:53:46 am
I carry a one ounce US Silver Eagle around in my change holder, as a reminder of what real money looks like. It occasionally gets tarnished, and I give it a quick wipe with some silver polish. But I'm using it as bullion, not for numismatic value.
Very few ASE's (American Silver Eagles) have numismatic value. The key date is the West Point minted (W mintmark) for 2005. A mere 30k were produced, and were only available as a part of a 5 coin set. The other coins in that set included all four denominations of Gold Eagles. The Silver Eagle in that set is actually worth more than the 1oz Gold Eagle! :thrshocker: There is a market for slabbed MS70 or PF70 Silver Eagles, but all that aside, ASE's are generally considered bullion and not numismatic. They fetch a higher premium percentage than junk silver, but not by much. Morgan Dollars actually have higher premiums than ASE's.

My favorite ASE's are the "burnished" or "reverse proof" coins. I just think they look cool. :mellow:

Reverse proof is on the left. Right side is Enhanced Uncirculated.
(http://www.coinnews.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/Reverse-Proof-and-Enhanced-Uncirculated-Coins-in-2013-West-Point-Silver-Eagle-Set.jpg)
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Splash22 on April 24, 2016, 10:03:22 pm

When I found my 1941 quarter, I did think of the things you mentioned...who had it, what was going on in the world, what did they buy, how many pockets it sat in...how much Tommy Dorsey did it hear? WWII was on.......
How cool would it be to regress a coin to glean all that info! Now there's a good sci-movie script YOU could write!
Holding the coin, you'd get to experience all the places it's been!
Hmmmm......That is an interesting premise! If I had the time, I would definitely write that.

Only thing even close in plot line, would be "Somewhere in Time".....when Christopher Reeves, accidently sees the 1979 penny, while he's actually in 1912. Yeah, a "chick flick, but the music makes me swoon!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BzfuXJ9NwlM
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: FDD on April 26, 2016, 07:29:09 am
2016 gold mercury dime sold out at the mint.

selling now for $388.00 for 1/10 oz gold mercury dime.
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Jake on April 26, 2016, 09:23:39 am
I wonder if Fort Knox Has anything it in. . . . . Yeah, I am trolling
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on April 26, 2016, 10:06:38 am
I wonder if Fort Knox Has anything it in. . . . . Yeah, I am trolling
There is a thread around here somewhere where that very topic is discussed.
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on April 26, 2016, 10:08:23 am
2016 gold mercury dime sold out at the mint.

selling now for $388.00 for 1/10 oz gold mercury dime.
Yup. Buyers were wait-listed after 15 minutes. Sold out in 40 minutes.

As for the price, I will be waiting for the secondary market to die down a bit before I get one. Too much "buzz" around the coin right now.
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on April 26, 2016, 10:20:21 am
I wonder if Fort Knox Has anything it in. . . . . Yeah, I am trolling
There is a thread around here somewhere where that very topic is discussed.
AH HA! Found it! :mellow:

https://secure.thementalmilitia.com/forums/index.php?topic=35313.0
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on April 29, 2016, 04:13:07 pm
Looks like there's still buried treasure out there to be found.

*warning! Self starting video*

There's text to read as well.

Enormous 1,300 lb haul of ancient Roman coins unearthed in Spain

http://www.cnn.com/2016/04/29/europe/spain-roman-coins-found/

Quote
More than 1,300 pounds (590kg) of bronze Roman coins dating to the 3rd century A.D. have been unearthed by construction workers digging a trench in Spain.

The ancient coins were found in 19 amphoras, a type of Roman jug, in Tomares, a town in Seville province.
Lola Vallejo, Tomares Urban Councillor, told CNN-affiliate Atlas that a crew had been digging a ditch to install electricity to a park when they came across the incredible find.
"The machines hit against something that wasn't normal for this soil," Vallejo said. "The workers immediately stopped, and soon discovered that there were many coins there, inside broken amphoras."



(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/ChJmq_6W0AAiPa1.jpg)
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Splash22 on April 29, 2016, 06:28:45 pm
WOW! Nice haul huh!

Last spring, two separate finds were made here on the "space coast" by private people, not a company of salvagers. If I can find the videos I'll post them. They found gold, just as brilliant and shiny as the day it was minted! 4.5 million and 1.2 million.

Now here's the interesting part...the countries from where the coins were minted, in this case Spain, They, not the salvager are entitled to the find. The rule here is, if you find it on land/ beach, it's yours. Not real sure just how Mel Fisher wound up with all the loot he did from the Atosha, perhaps the laws were different 40 years ago.

In this case (your thread), which by the way, Seville was the starting point for journeys back and forth by Menéndez to St. Augustine.. A journey of 3 months.
From the article, it looks like they were found and brought back and buried in Spain. The historical value is incredible, but there will be some international controversy over who actually gets to keep the spoils.

Just one DL, wouldn't you be happy with just one of those babies???
~S

Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on April 29, 2016, 08:10:09 pm
Just one DL, wouldn't you be happy with just one of those babies???
~S
Yes. I would most certainly be happy to own one. I'd rather have some Roman coins from the time before they were debased, but I'd settle for one of those. :mellow:
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Splash22 on April 30, 2016, 11:53:52 am
What is the most elusive coin you'd love to find? Have a favorite?

My favorite coin is the Brit 1 pound coin. Size of a dime a tad thicker than a nickel. Just like the weight of it.
Also like the yen is it? With the little square cutout in the middle.
~S
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on April 30, 2016, 02:07:30 pm
What is the most elusive coin you'd love to find? Have a favorite?

My favorite coin is the Brit 1 pound coin. Size of a dime a tad thicker than a nickel. Just like the weight of it.
Also like the yen is it? With the little square cutout in the middle.
~S
I prefer US coins. My most favorite coin in my collection is not really worth much. It's just a lowly 1964 Kennedy half dollar. It has even gold toning and is a very attractive coin. I have coins worth many thousands of FRN's, but my favorites are the under-appreciated ones.

A coin that I would love to find would be probably a colonial coin. I have one, but would like more. I have a "hard times token" that states, "I take the responsibility/The constitution as I understand it" on it. Not worth much, but it's pretty cool. Political satire at it's finest! :mellow:

http://www.mansfieldnumismaticsociety.org/hardtimestokens.htm
Quote
Low 51. I take the responsibility/ The constitution as I understand it

This is an example of a political head token portraying Jackson emerging from a money chest holding both a sword and a money bag. This expressed contemporary fears that it was dangerous that the executive could control both the army and the treasury.

Contemporary cartoonists liked to portray Jackson in full military regalia or dressed as a king with a crown and flowing ermine robes. (Interestingly the Whig party was named after the British anti-royal party because Jackson was too autocratic and behaving like a king.) On the one hand Jackson was obstinate and autocratic, and his followers were constantly carping on about how he won the battle of New Orleans. On the other hand he was somewhat clumsy in speech and poorly educated. Cartoonists portrayed him as a Jackass not Jackson. He married Rachel Robards before she was divorced, and had to remarry her after her divorce decree—equivalent in those times to the Monica Lewinsky affair! He even killed several people in duels defending her name!

With this background it is easy to see why, when Harvard gave him an honorary LL.D., he was portrayed as a Jackass with an LL.D. on its side.

“I take the responsibility” is what Jackson said when he put the Bank of the United States funds into 25 pet state banks. “The Constitution as I understand it” was his explanation of why he took the anti-federalist stance of putting the money into State banks. Roman firmness was a jibe of the day to describe him. The word VETO below the Jackass referred to his veto of the third bank of the United States. Clinton was certainly not the first president who liked to use the power of veto!

(http://usrarecoininvestments.com/images/page/cat32/item522/26222_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Adam Ruff on April 30, 2016, 06:33:10 pm
DiabloLoco,

I have been collecting coins on and off since I was a kid but I never actually purchased one until about 10 years ago. My collection is small and not worth very much but my favorite item for some reason is an old USSR note I got out of a cereal box way back when. I doubt it is worth anything really but it is in near perfect condition and has the hammer and sickle water mark on it. The only reason I like it is that I got it a little bit before the USSR collapsed and the wall came down. I have a Spanish doubloon from the El Cazador ship wreck which I like as well. Most of my coins are just worth a bit more than face value but one or two items stand out. I am just an amateur collector but it is fun and keeps me looking at my change. I will check out your photo grading site you posted DiabloLoco and thanks for the tip. Now I can get close to grading my coins accurately where as before I couldn't. I have been collecting quarters for the past few years now so if you need to fill in some state or national park quarters let me know I can probably trade you for something you have.
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on April 30, 2016, 07:56:15 pm
DiabloLoco,

I have been collecting coins on and off since I was a kid but I never actually purchased one until about 10 years ago. My collection is small and not worth very much but my favorite item for some reason is an old USSR note I got out of a cereal box way back when. I doubt it is worth anything really but it is in near perfect condition and has the hammer and sickle water mark on it. The only reason I like it is that I got it a little bit before the USSR collapsed and the wall came down. I have a Spanish doubloon from the El Cazador ship wreck which I like as well. Most of my coins are just worth a bit more than face value but one or two items stand out. I am just an amateur collector but it is fun and keeps me looking at my change. I will check out your photo grading site you posted DiabloLoco and thanks for the tip. Now I can get close to grading my coins accurately where as before I couldn't. I have been collecting quarters for the past few years now so if you need to fill in some state or national park quarters let me know I can probably trade you for something you have.
I'm glad that you like to collect! Finding cool coins in circulation is always more exciting than buying them. Cheaper too! :laugh:

As for the modern quarters, I appreciate the offer, but I'm all set there. I have dozens of State/Territory/National Parks sets. Now if you have any quarters that are older than say 1892, I'm more than interested! :mellow:

Currently, I am into collecting "type" coins. Especially obsolete US coinage, such as 1/2 cent, 2 cent, 3 cent (silver and nickel), half dime, and 20 cent pieces. No chance of finding THOSE in circulation! :shakehead:

20 cent pieces are especially hard to find, even at coin shows. Even the most common one (1875-s) goes for around $100 on the cheap end. I have gone to shows with dozens of vendors/dealers and there were none there at all. :ohshit2:

If you have any "holes" in your albums that you have trouble filling, I'd be happy to help you out. :thumbsup:

PS- What kind of cereal had a Russian note as a prize? :dontknow: Late 80's?

Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Adam Ruff on April 30, 2016, 09:42:49 pm


PS- What kind of cereal had a Russian note as a prize? :dontknow: Late 80's?

It was some kids cereal box and it actually had about 5 notes in the prize from different countries all completely worthless of course. I figured you were way ahead of me on the quarters but I thought I would offer just in case. I am looking to fill in my mercury dime set right now so as soon as I have some spare cash I will start buying some that I don't have. I do have a very interesting novelty item though that I bet you don't have. It is a half dollar with tails on both sides. It looks authentic but I bought it at Disneyland a long time ago when they had a magic shop on main street. I have a good record of winning coin flips with it here and there over the years hehe.
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on May 01, 2016, 06:58:16 am

 I am looking to fill in my mercury dime set right now so as soon as I have some spare cash I will start buying some that I don't have.

Good luck with that. I only have 1 complete Merc set. The 1916-d (key date) will set you back at least $800. The 1921 and 1921-d (semi-key) will be at least $50-$75.

Quote
I do have a very interesting novelty item though that I bet you don't have. It is a half dollar with tails on both sides. It looks authentic but I bought it at Disneyland a long time ago when they had a magic shop on main street. I have a good record of winning coin flips with it here and there over the years hehe.
You thought wrong. :threvil: I actually got two of those in a $100 face value bag of silver halves. Both of them were tails/tails and were both Franklins. Believe it or not, I sold one of them for $30. :mellow:
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Moonbeam on May 01, 2016, 08:57:24 am

When I found my 1941 quarter, I did think of the things you mentioned...who had it, what was going on in the world, what did they buy, how many pockets it sat in...how much Tommy Dorsey did it hear? WWII was on.......
How cool would it be to regress a coin to glean all that info! Now there's a good sci-movie script YOU could write!
Holding the coin, you'd get to experience all the places it's been!
Hmmmm......That is an interesting premise! If I had the time, I would definitely write that.

That would make for an interesting story! There is a movie called Twenty Dollars from the '90's that follows the journey, if you will, of a $20 bill. It's been awhile since I saw it, but I remember how it provoked some interesting discussions among us viewers.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0108410/?ref_=nm_flmg_act_33
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on May 01, 2016, 09:13:39 am

When I found my 1941 quarter, I did think of the things you mentioned...who had it, what was going on in the world, what did they buy, how many pockets it sat in...how much Tommy Dorsey did it hear? WWII was on.......
How cool would it be to regress a coin to glean all that info! Now there's a good sci-movie script YOU could write!
Holding the coin, you'd get to experience all the places it's been!
Hmmmm......That is an interesting premise! If I had the time, I would definitely write that.

That would make for an interesting story! There is a movie called Twenty Dollars from the '90's that follows the journey, if you will, of a $20 bill. It's been awhile since I saw it, but I remember how it provoked some interesting discussions among us viewers.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0108410/?ref_=nm_flmg_act_33
Kinda reminds me a bit of the "where's George" website. (http://www.wheresgeorge.com/)

Some people here have most likely seen that stamp on a $1 bill.

(http://media.techeblog.com/images/where_s_george.jpg)

If you find one, you can type in the serial # to show where the bill is now, as well as see where it has been in the past. It's pretty interesting.
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: FDD on May 01, 2016, 12:43:02 pm
there was something like that here.
you could make a stamp, and then stamp a 1 dollar bill, and then see if it came back to you, or if you found one later.

the thread is someplace here, just not sure where.
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Splash22 on May 01, 2016, 03:22:23 pm
DL, I've tracked a few "where's George"! Very cool! But you don't see too many these days..
My son showed be a "track..Bessie", whatever her name was, a great white. Hundreds of miles up and down the coasts.

Moon, I'd love to watch that, thanks for the link!
~S
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: FDD on May 01, 2016, 05:06:02 pm
Here it is

the Rebelfire stamp

https://secure.thementalmilitia.com/forums/index.php?topic=6370.0
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on May 06, 2016, 02:04:15 pm
Pennsylvania Association of Numismatists Snaps Early Pics of Gold Standing Liberty Quarter

http://news.coinupdate.com/pennsylvania-association-of-numismatists-snaps-early-pics-of-gold-standing-liberty-quarter/

Quote
Last week, the Pennsylvania Association of Numismatists (PAN) shared early images of the 2016 Standing Liberty Quarter Centennial Gold Coin on social media.

The coins were encountered by PAN President Tom Uram at a U.S. Mint booth at the Central States Numismatic Society’s 77th Anniversary Convention in Schaumburg, Illinois. Several images were posted to PAN’s Twitter and Facebook accounts, giving collectors glimpses of both the obverse and reverse of the coin.

You can take an early look at one of the year’s most anticipated U.S. Mint releases below.

(http://news.coinupdate.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/ChJrSjAXEAASMALL.jpg)
(http://news.coinupdate.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/13087746_1015307921882096_82107SMALLer.jpg)

Quote
The U.S. Mint has yet to provide a release date for the 2016 Standing Liberty Quarter Centennial Gold Coin, but updates will be posted as more information becomes available.


So pretty!!! I want it!!!! :laugh:

FYI- This coin will weigh 1/4 oz.
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on May 27, 2016, 03:38:44 pm
It's been a while since I have posted here.

SO........Anybody find any cool coins lately?

I haven't found much. A few "wheaties", but they were from the 50's. :rolleyes:
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Tahn L. on May 31, 2016, 11:54:38 am
Concerning the gold SLQ, I wonder why the mint is using "24k" instead of .999 fine, if that is what I saw in the photo?

Added: I know that 24k and .999 are the same, I was just wondering why they switched.
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on May 31, 2016, 02:28:16 pm
Concerning the gold SLQ, I wonder why the mint is using "24k" instead of .999 fine, if that is what I saw in the photo?

Added: I know that 24k and .999 are the same, I was just wondering why they switched.
24k is actually four nines- .9999 pure.
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Tahn L. on May 31, 2016, 07:28:34 pm
Concerning the gold SLQ, I wonder why the mint is using "24k" instead of .999 fine, if that is what I saw in the photo?

Added: I know that 24k and .999 are the same, I was just wondering why they switched.
24k is actually four nines- .9999 pure.

My point was why are they changing from purity, (millesimal fineness) , (.999 or .9999, whichever), to the karat system?

I don't remember much bullion using the karat method before, which is usually used for jewelry. Why the switch?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fineness
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on May 31, 2016, 07:38:17 pm
Concerning the gold SLQ, I wonder why the mint is using "24k" instead of .999 fine, if that is what I saw in the photo?

Added: I know that 24k and .999 are the same, I was just wondering why they switched.
24k is actually four nines- .9999 pure.

My point was why are they changing from purity (.999 or .9999, whichever), to the karat system?
Short answer.......they're not. The usual gold eagles are actually .9170 purity. The 24k (.9999) composition are just for certain coins, such as the special centennial releases for 2016. As a matter of fact, in the US Mint listing for those coins, both 24K and .9999 are listed.

As seen here-

http://www.govmint.com/us-coins/other-us-coins/dime/2016-w-1-10-oz-gold-centennial-mercury-dime-ngc-sp70-first-release-weinman-black.html

Gold eagle composition seen here-

http://www.govmint.com/us-coins/gold-coins/gold-eagle/2016-50-dollar-1-oz-gold-eagle-bu.html
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Tahn L. on May 31, 2016, 07:42:11 pm
Concerning the gold SLQ, I wonder why the mint is using "24k" instead of .999 fine, if that is what I saw in the photo?

Added: I know that 24k and .999 are the same, I was just wondering why they switched.
24k is actually four nines- .9999 pure.

My point was why are they changing from purity (.999 or .9999, whichever), to the karat system?
Short answer.......they're not. The usual gold eagles are actually .9170 purity. The 24k (.9999) composition are just for certain coins, such as the special centennial releases for 2016.

I expanded my question, probably while you were answering. Sorry. The buffalo is .999 but they do not use the karat system on it. I was just wondering why they switched.
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on May 31, 2016, 07:45:35 pm


I expanded my question, probably while you were answering. Sorry. The buffalo is .999 but they do not use the karat system on it. I was just wondering why they switched.
Again, only for certain coins. They still use decimals, even if 24k is listed. All of the gold coins that are .999 or .9999 are very low mintage.
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Tahn L. on May 31, 2016, 07:46:10 pm
Both of your examples are from 2016. Can you think of an earlier issue that uses karats?
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on May 31, 2016, 08:01:57 pm
Both of your examples are from 2016. Can you think of an earlier issue that uses karats?
No. There are none. Even if 24 karat is listed in the description, it's just a selling point. Something to grab the buyer's attention. The Mint still uses decimals for composition. Look at the specs of the coin, not the sales pitch. Even the coin itself will have decimals on the reverse, not karats.


(http://d3dvcd92jhtyud.cloudfront.net/cdn/582748/media/catalog/product/cache/1/thumbnail/100x/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/g/o/gold_buffalo_rev.jpg)
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Tahn L. on May 31, 2016, 08:07:27 pm
Both of your examples are from 2016. Can you think of an earlier issue that uses karats?
No. There are none. Even if 24 karat is listed in the description, it's just a selling point. Something to grab the buyer's attention. The Mint still uses decimals for composition. Look at the specs of the coin, not the sales pitch. Even the coin itself will have decimals on the reverse, not karats.

Ah, I could not see that from the photos. So they still will use the millesimal fineness nomenclature?
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Tahn L. on May 31, 2016, 08:24:02 pm
DL,  From your link to the gold dime, I see that there is not a fineness on the reverse. Again, I am just wondering why they switched to using karats instead of millesimal fineness.
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on June 01, 2016, 05:13:25 am
DL,  From your link to the gold dime, I see that there is not a fineness on the reverse. Again, I am just wondering why they switched to using karats instead of millesimal fineness.
Ah.....My mistake. I believe that it says 24k only on the centennial coins.

I do not believe that they are/will switch to karats.
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on June 27, 2016, 01:16:55 pm
A recent article that I found very interesting.

What Was the First Coin to Be Issued by Authority of the United States?
http://news.coinupdate.com/qa-what-was-the-first-coin-to-be-issued-by-authority-of-the-united-states/

(http://news.coinupdate.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/fugioBetterObBOTH.jpg)

Quote
Q:  What was the first coin to be issued by authority of the United States and when was it issued?

A:  Commerce was plagued by a flow of underweight state coppers and forgeries of English coppers in the years immediately following the American Revolution. The “Fugio” cent was authorized by Congress on April 21, 1787, in an effort to remedy this frustrating economic situation. Congress directed that the coins bear a representation of a sundial, the date 1787, FUGIO (“time flies”), and the motto MIND YOUR BUSINESS on the obverse, with 13 linked circles and the motto WE ARE ONE on the reverse. Since the incorporation of these mottos often is attributed to Benjamin Franklin’s suggestion, the coins are sometimes referred to as Franklin cents.

As the United States did not have a mint in 1787, a contract for the striking of 300 tons of Fugio coppers was awarded to New Haven’s James Jarvis, part owner of a company that had coined coppers for the state of Connecticut. Most of the 400,000 Fugio coppers struck were produced in early 1788 — with the copper being salvaged from bands that had held together the powder kegs sent to America by the French — after which Jarvis defaulted on his contract.

Quite ironic to think that the first coin commissioned by the US had the phrase "Mind Your Business" on it, when today the government thinks the EVERYTHING is their business and whether the word business indicated social or was meant to be literal, doesn't respect privacy AT ALL and meddles in ALL business. :rolleyes:

Time does indeed fly. In this case though, the destination kinda sucks. :laugh:
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: FDD on June 27, 2016, 03:44:19 pm
That 1/10 of an oz gold dime, I just saw going for $581.00
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on June 27, 2016, 05:54:00 pm
That 1/10 of an oz gold dime, I just saw going for $581.00
:thrshocker: That's ridiculous! They are going for less than $300 graded SP70 (highest possible grade) from PCGS on ebay.
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: FDD on June 29, 2016, 02:28:13 pm
here is the link to the $500.00 dime

http://www.silvertowne.com/p-25734-2016-w-gold-mercury-dime-centennial-coin-tenth-ounce-sp70-fs-pcgs-100th-anniversary-first-day-of-issue-1-of-300-label.aspx
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: Adam Ruff on June 29, 2016, 03:18:30 pm
here is the link to the $500.00 dime

http://www.silvertowne.com/p-25734-2016-w-gold-mercury-dime-centennial-coin-tenth-ounce-sp70-fs-pcgs-100th-anniversary-first-day-of-issue-1-of-300-label.aspx

That is the first one struck that is why they are asking for so much.
Title: Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
Post by: DiabloLoco on June 29, 2016, 06:55:35 pm
here is the link to the $500.00 dime

http://www.silvertowne.com/p-25734-2016-w-gold-mercury-dime-centennial-coin-tenth-ounce-sp70-fs-pcgs-100th-anniversary-first-day-of-issue-1-of-300-label.aspx

That is the first one struck that is why they are asking for so much.
Wow! That would explain the high premium.