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 1 
 on: Today at 11:42:42 am 
Started by slidemansailor - Last post by knobster
Personally, on many projects it's not a matter of "can I do this myself" it is more of a "Do I want to spend my precious time on this".  Price does affect this.  Installing my own water heater saved me well north of $600.  Replacing my gravel driveway with concrete... I'm calling the pros.

Regarding gunsmithing, most things I would try to do myself and I've even taken quite a few courses from AGI that Julio AerialDemonMutt mentioned. 

 2 
 on: Today at 11:27:14 am 
Started by slidemansailor - Last post by MamaLiberty
Bloodpressure (so called) medicine won't help anyone, really. My younger son could take apart anything... and eventually learned how to put it back together in better shape than it was before. But he had some problems in the beginning until he learned to SLOW DOWN and think things through FIRST. This was long before there was an internet full of videos, obviously. :)

Leftover parts are usually a good clue seeking help might be in order. I disassembled my M1 .30 to clean out old, old cosmoline. I had laid out the parts in the order they came off, using a manual... but someone moved all the parts, and the pictures in the manual were not clear enough for me to reconstruct it. Always had at least one part "left over." One of the riflemen in my club quickly assembled it, and it shoots just fine now. I also learned how to do it myself, next time. :)

Perhaps you can get away with doing it yourself... but sometimes it doesn't hurt to get a little help. If the gunsmith will let you, watch and learn. :)

 3 
 on: Today at 11:01:11 am 
Started by slidemansailor - Last post by AerialDemonMutt
Yes Gunsmiths are cheaper than Meds.
having said that, I did take a gunsmithing course from American Gunsmithing Institute.

they also have a video on just about any gun you want to learn about. from tear down to repair and rebuild.

www.americangunsmithinginstitute.net

cheaper than Meds and you do not need a doctors note.

Dawg 

 4 
 on: Today at 10:50:01 am 
Started by slidemansailor - Last post by slidemansailor
I grew up doing whatever for myself: hiring out as a professional in many fields, yet rarely hiring for work I could figure out. The school of hard knocks taught a few lessons, but mostly I found myself to be reasonably adept at do-it-yourself.

Operating high-power defense tools, loading ammo for them and working over their internal mechanisms might be a good place to hire experts.  Yet self-proclaimed experts in most fields make serious mistakes, gunsmithing included.

Is it greater risk to dive into a firearm repair or modification without experience, or hire someone whose liability insurer says is reliable?

I entered the gun owning, using, reloading culture in my late 30s. My mentors loaded their own, maintained their own, repaired their own. I haven't considered doing otherwise.

I've been a bolt-on mechanic for street and race from wooden coasters, bicycles forward. The pattern continues, and I have been happy with the results.  Volquartsen parts made transformed my Ruger 10-22 from a nice kid's gun to an adult rifle. Mosin-Nagant and Swiss straight-pull rifles have been restored in my shop without any instruction or owner's manuals.

Oh sure, the lawyers always include their "Don't try this at home, kiddies" messages in the parts package, but they don't mean it.  Nowadays the Internet has videos on how to do anything. Don't be telling me you need brain surgery or I might give it a go.

Yesterday I smoothed out the trigger in my XDm with a highly-recommended kit from Powder River Precision. I did NOT put in the race-gun parts as this is a real world tool that cannot be finicky.  Part I of the instructional video starts with the lawyer's disclaimers. Yeah-yeah-yeah... get on with it.

I watched the videos, then took my computer to my workbench and stepped through the process.  It went real well until the last 1/3rd of the process where, with parts remaining on my bench and a pistol in way-too-many pieces, the demonstration gun was *POOF* magically assembled and functioning.

Visions of abuse being heaped upon me for trying it at home when I arrive at the gunsmithy with a box of parts ran through my head as I flailed away at getting the pieces to fit together usefully.  I sat down in the living room and downed a pint ... of water. Then I went back to my shrapnel pile only to find it coming together as a functioning - belay that - a beautifully functioning XDm.   Phew!

Are gunsmiths less expensive than blood pressure meds?

 5 
 on: March 29, 2017, 06:30:03 pm 
Started by Zefferon - Last post by DiabloLoco
How are women and tornadoes alike?

They both moan like hell when they come, and take the house when they leave.




This beautiful woman one day walks into a doctors office and the doctor is bowled over by how stunningly awesome she is. All his professionallism goes right out the window...

He tells her to take her pants, she does, and he starts rubbing her thighs.

"Do you know what I am doing?" asks the doctor?

"Yes, checking for abnormalities." she replies.

He tells her to take off her shirt and bra, she takes them off. The doctor begins rubbing her breasts and asks, "Do you know what I am doing now?", she replies, "Yes, checking for cancer."

Finally, he tells her to take off her panties, lays her on the table, gets on top of her and starts having sex with her. He says to her, "Do you know what I am doing now?"

She replies, "Yes, getting herpies - thats why I am here!"





A farmhand is driving around the farm, checking the fences. After a few minutes he radios his boss and says, "Boss, I've got a problem. I hit a pig on the road and he's stuck in the bull-bars of my truck. He's still wriggling. What should I do?"

"In the back of your truck there's a shotgun. Shoot the pig in the head and when it stops wriggling you can pull it out and throw it in a bush." The farm worker says okay and signs off. About 10 minutes later he radios back. "Boss I did what you said, I shot the pig and dragged it out and threw it in a bush."

"So what's the problem now?" his Boss snapped.

"The blue light on his motorcycle is still flashing!"



What a woman says...

This place is a mess! C'mon!
You and I need to clean up!
Your stuff is lying on the floor and
You'll have no clothes to wear if we
don't do laundry right now!

What a man hears...

blah blah blah blah blah C'MON!
YOU AND I blah blah blah blah!
blah blah blah blah ON THE FLOOR blah
blah blah NO CLOTHES blah blah blah blah
blah blah blah RIGHT NOW!






Hello, is this the FBI?"
"Yes. What do you want?"
"I'm calling to report about my neighbor Billy Bob Smith! He is hiding marijuana inside his firewood." "Thank you very much for the call, sir." The next day, the FBI agents descend on Billy Bob's house. They search the shed where the firewood is kept. Using axes, they bust open every piece of wood, but find no marijuana. They swore at Billy Bob and left... The phone rings at Billy Bob's house:
"Hey, Billy Bob! Did the FBI come?"
"Yeah!"
"Did they chop your firewood?"
"Yep."
"Happy Birthday, Buddy"

 6 
 on: March 29, 2017, 01:58:07 pm 
Started by AerialDemonMutt - Last post by MamaLiberty
That seems to be a common issue.  All the apple orchards out here have a handful of cherry trees amongst the apple.  Upon asking about this the owner said the cherry trees were to feed the birds.  I guess they like cherry more than apple.

The birds used to make a mess of the peaches when I lived in the desert, but never bothered the apples. Same idea, I guess. Never tried any cherries there. The cherries would have to develop at the same time as the apples and apricots in order to protect them from the birds, but I'd think it would take more than one cherry tree to do the job, but we'll see. The birds were not interested in the crab apples last year, but the hail got them when they were no bigger than cherries... so I really don't know.  I hate hail... sigh

 7 
 on: March 29, 2017, 01:52:33 pm 
Started by AerialDemonMutt - Last post by knobster
Talked with a coworker about cherry trees.  He suggested a cultivar called 'Meteor'. 

That's the variety I have. It was just planted two years ago this summer, and has never flowered, but I have hopes. It was damaged in shipment to the greenhouse to start with, and seriously beat up with the hail the first year I had it. The astonishing thing is how well it has grown anyway, and once I can safely cut off some of the damaged parts, I expect it to do OK. Now, if I can figure out how to prevent the birds from eating all the fruit, should it produce any... that will be another challenge. The birds got most of the gooseberries and currants last year, first full crop that developed. The birds don't mind at all if the fruit is too green to pick. sigh

That seems to be a common issue.  All the apple orchards out here have a handful of cherry trees amongst the apple.  Upon asking about this the owner said the cherry trees were to feed the birds.  I guess they like cherry more than apple.

 8 
 on: March 29, 2017, 08:44:52 am 
Started by mouse - Last post by MamaLiberty
If what I read about the FBI (and this information never comes from fiction books) is true, they are the most dangerous government department ever and I find it amazing that people trust them with their most personal information

Every part and person in the non-voluntary government is corrupt and dangerous. That's a really good place to start with one's thinking. And those who willingly give those criminals any information will, no doubt, eventually reap what they sow. I'm not responsible for what anyone else does, of course, nor am I able to do anything about it.

Did you read the article about data overload? Sure they collect it, and complicate their own problems as a result.

Quote
I am not concerned about it for me personally (well, to be honest, I am not important enough for it to matter)

LOL! EXACTLY. The high profile people who represent a "threat" to the criminals should be afraid of it all, but very few people present any credible threat to them to start with, and those are usually other government criminals in the first place. Yes, good people trying to do good things for liberty are sometimes a target, but they have to know the risks going in. The data gatherers and users are far, far outnumbered by the ordinary people who present no (known) threat to anyone. And I enjoy the heck out of seeing all of the infighting, the betrayals and back stabbing the criminals IN government carry on among them. This new "administration" and his enemies is the best entertainment I've had in years.

Quote
How people use their household appliances seems rather trivial information 

Trivial indeed, and only adding to the chaos of too much information.  But the danger of tattletale appliances is more in the way that data can drive marketing to consumers, not what's reported to government about how often you open the doors or what temperature you set. And, as with all advertisement and marketing, the individual actually has all the control he/she needs, regardless. I do not allow advertising to control my spending or decisions, and use them as a guideline only rarely. And I have no use for "smart" phones, refrigerators or anything else. The dumb ones work just fine. But if people choose to be monitored, herded and controlled... again, none of my business and not my problem.

 9 
 on: March 29, 2017, 08:29:53 am 
Started by slidemansailor - Last post by MamaLiberty
At the end of it my wife admitted, "I'm turning into a country girl."  I had to turn my head so she wouldn't see the tears of joy flowing.  But she may have noticed my Snoopy Happy Dance...

I am just so happy for you... and her. What a joy indeed. :)

 10 
 on: March 29, 2017, 08:27:23 am 
Started by AerialDemonMutt - Last post by MamaLiberty
Talked with a coworker about cherry trees.  He suggested a cultivar called 'Meteor'. 

That's the variety I have. It was just planted two years ago this summer, and has never flowered, but I have hopes. It was damaged in shipment to the greenhouse to start with, and seriously beat up with the hail the first year I had it. The astonishing thing is how well it has grown anyway, and once I can safely cut off some of the damaged parts, I expect it to do OK. Now, if I can figure out how to prevent the birds from eating all the fruit, should it produce any... that will be another challenge. The birds got most of the gooseberries and currants last year, first full crop that developed. The birds don't mind at all if the fruit is too green to pick. sigh

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