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Author Topic: Help Me Write a Letter to My Nephew  (Read 8417 times)

AnotherArmchair

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Re: Help Me Write a Letter to My Nephew
« Reply #15 on: September 10, 2006, 04:37:33 pm »

My guess regarding the breakfast program is that some would-be Arisian in the skool administration decided that making it mandatory for everyone would take the stigma off the kids who weren't getting breakfast at home (self-esteem, don't y'know?). Wouldn't be the Progressive Utopia of California, by chance?
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Kirsten

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Re: Help Me Write a Letter to My Nephew
« Reply #16 on: September 12, 2006, 02:44:37 pm »

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« Last Edit: March 14, 2007, 06:48:58 pm by Kirsten »
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debeez

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Re: Help Me Write a Letter to My Nephew
« Reply #17 on: September 12, 2006, 04:03:02 pm »

Arizona...When I lived in Flagstaff in the mid-to-late 70's there was a lot of the Native American population who had serious poverty issues.  I imagine that a lot of it hasn't changed since then.  Possibly they began breakfast and lunch to target these particular populations and just ended up making them mandatory so that there wasn't any accusations of singling a certain ethnic group out.

Just a thought...
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Christine
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Kirsten

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Re: Help Me Write a Letter to My Nephew
« Reply #18 on: September 12, 2006, 05:14:10 pm »

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« Last Edit: March 14, 2007, 06:44:38 pm by Kirsten »
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Kirsten

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Re: Help Me Write a Letter to My Nephew
« Reply #19 on: October 01, 2006, 12:08:58 am »

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« Last Edit: March 14, 2007, 06:45:05 pm by Kirsten »
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debeez

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Re: Help Me Write a Letter to My Nephew
« Reply #20 on: October 01, 2006, 07:47:40 am »

well that's an easy one, social opportunities exist everywhere.  From Scouts to museums to local events to of couse the obvious one, homeschool groups.

Here in Kansas City there is a neat monthly 'paper' put out called Mother and Child Reunion.  It's free, and I find it in doctor's offices, hospitals, and other places where you will find kids.  It has listings of events, from science museum features to art fairs.  I imagine that wherever your sister lives, there is something similar to it.  The nice thing is that it would get her out there with like-minded people--other parents--and maybe foster friendships that will help her over the years as she raises her children. 

I can relate to your sister.  I don't have many people I refer to as friends, fewer still that I respect or would trust, and that has been a concern of mine as well--that this new one on the way will know far too few people.  I plan on going to a lot of events, and joining a homeschooling group, so that I can hopefully find some good social contacts as well.
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Alpha Drill

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Re: Help Me Write a Letter to My Nephew
« Reply #21 on: October 01, 2006, 09:15:25 am »

Quote
Anyway, I suspect that her main reason for putting the kid in school is for social purposes.  She didn't have any close friends growing up and as an adult doesn't have any close friends outside the family.  It may be that she wants her kids to have an opportunity to make friends.  Any thoughts on how I can subtly and in a non-interfering, non-nosy way point out non-school opportunities for kids to socialize?

Kristen,

It sounds like your sister is making your nephew into something he shouldn't  be. If you sister doesn't have any close friends outside the family, then depending on her personal level of awareness, you could always introduce her to this forum, with the opportunities for meet-up's that are posted on a periodical basis, she could meet a bunch of new people that would be friends of an acceptable nature straight away. These new friends could then perhaps indoctrinating her towards homeschooling. I say could, due to the fact that my father is about to retire from education after 30 years in the public system, and is taking care of his adopted 4-year old son (my brother), every time I speak with him on the phone, I keep trying to extol the benefits of homeschooling on him, so far without success.

As far as non-public education socialization opportunities go, there is always, both opportunity secular and religious in nature. The Roman Catholic Church has a variety of programs, set up (I could only imagine with the Archdiocese of Phoenix) that would do just nicely. On the Secular side, the Boy Scouts of America, have a program, called Tiger Cubs, which is purpose-built for young boys of his age. In addition the Greater United Way and Boys and Girls Clubs of America have programs, set up in Phoenix as well. Though some may not agree with what I have written, at least I'm providing possible solutions to this quandary of our greater family.
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Kirsten

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Re: Help Me Write a Letter to My Nephew
« Reply #22 on: October 01, 2006, 11:39:13 am »

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« Last Edit: March 14, 2007, 06:45:22 pm by Kirsten »
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MSlee

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Re: Help Me Write a Letter to My Nephew
« Reply #23 on: October 01, 2006, 03:11:25 pm »

Quote
Anyway, I suspect that her main reason for putting the kid in school is for social purposes.  She didn't have any close friends growing up and as an adult doesn't have any close friends outside the family.  It may be that she wants her kids to have an opportunity to make friends.  Any thoughts on how I can subtly and in a non-interfering, non-nosy way point out non-school opportunities for kids to socialize?


Kirsten,

    I'm not sure this will help, but what I think you mean are things like:

    How little time it really takes for children to learn 'School' (younger grades 2-3 hours per day)
   Think how much time the child will have left to follow their interests
   On that thread look at what HSers have done with that opportunity
   -gone to the Olympics
   -written best sellers  (Eragon the movie comes out this fall)
   -National spelling bee
   etc..
 
* How much family time you can spend together (Mom gets to experience all the firsts....reading, geometry, their first insights into logic....)
  They can schedule themselves to let the children spend more time with dad. (who cares when school vacation is, we can go when we want..)
 
 *So many who make it all the way through HS can get a jump on 'their underlings..pers' 
  Our group has half of the graduating class finishing at 17 with some college credit already under their belt.

There are: HS sport teams
               Moms groups
               Play dates
               Co-ops
               Class newsletters
               Volunteer groups     
               Class plays
               Lego Robotic leagues (my sons first) 
               Proms
               Graduations

In the community there are:
              YMCAs or YWCA's with classes
              Local community colleges
             Retired teachers who offer classes/tutoring
             community recreation

I know many of the members in our group feel sometimes there are too many field trips, too many parties, too many activities....Most of us who stick with it find slowing down is nice and you actually learn who your children are and enjoy spending time with them.
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Kirsten

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Re: Help Me Write a Letter to My Nephew
« Reply #24 on: October 01, 2006, 03:33:46 pm »

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« Last Edit: March 14, 2007, 06:45:57 pm by Kirsten »
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MSlee

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Re: Help Me Write a Letter to My Nephew
« Reply #25 on: October 01, 2006, 04:01:04 pm »

I think the problem (a least mine) is trying to give you ideas in short-hand.

 If your sister is frustrated that the school isn't offerring enough. Give her ideas on what you've 'heard' one of your 'friends' child is doing. 

Become really! really! interested in how and what her kids are doing in school.

I think if you can get her on the subject of her child and complaining. .... Interject the opportunities...You don't have to be too forceful.  If she complains enough, she might get frustrated enough to 'look outside the box'.  Be supportive, encourage her discontent, and you might finally be given the opportunity to preach.
(I had a neighbor when we first moved to MS who was TOTALLY against HS-ing....Until her grandson got in trouble with school....thennnn she comes running and begging for help/advice)

You can extole 'how much better she would be at teaching her child".

Maybe find out the child's interest and find an outside place that might offer more opportunity for the child to excel "well I hear the 4-h does that.... or Suzy my neighbor's girl is soo happy to be in this club and doing  her 'favorite activity' She has made the best of friends with so many other girls....


"mention how little time children in school are really learning and not just be shuttled from class to class.  MRS Guard can I go to the bathroom?"

Basically when we give you specific activities,  we are trying to give you ammunition for those times when she seems receptive.
« Last Edit: October 01, 2006, 04:03:51 pm by MSlee »
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Kirsten

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Re: Help Me Write a Letter to My Nephew
« Reply #26 on: October 01, 2006, 04:12:06 pm »

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« Last Edit: March 14, 2007, 06:46:25 pm by Kirsten »
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RagnarDanneskjold

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Re: Help Me Write a Letter to My Nephew
« Reply #27 on: October 01, 2006, 08:24:30 pm »

...
Anyway, I suspect that her main reason for putting the kid in school is for social purposes. She didn't have any close friends growing up and as an adult doesn't have any close friends outside the family. It may be that she wants her kids to have an opportunity to make friends. Any thoughts on how I can subtly and in a non-interfering, non-nosy way point out non-school opportunities for kids to socialize?

Kirsten, you said that you suspect the reason is for social purposes. At this time you don't know that for sure. So, you would have to work that into the conversation, too. I really don't know a subtle way if the topic would never come up in conversation. I think you have to just find a lull in conversation somewhere and come right out with it.

Maybe say that you were having a conversation with some friends who do homeschool and that some of them had concerns about limiting the opportunity to develop close friendships. However, once they took the plunge into homeschooling, they found those fears were warrantless. My daughters, from an early age, have been able to relate to people well below and above their ages. From babies to adults. Because we don't plunk them down amongst only age peers, they don't have the limitations of only being able to relate to people their age.
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Lazarus Long

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Re: Help Me Write a Letter to My Nephew
« Reply #28 on: November 28, 2006, 11:49:39 pm »

Greetings Kirsten,

I would appeal to your sister's maternal instincts, as well as her aspirations to teach.

How's your nephew? I'm rather late to this thread, but I guess I might as well add my $0.02 worth now that I'm here.

It's always flattering (although sometimes too obviously so) to have people express interest in my kids. So you should be able to keep your nephews and nieces (?) on the conversational radar without too much trouble. If your sister ever expresses any regret about seeing them grow up, if she ever misses them being gone all day, etc. (not everyone does but I sure as hell would) I would ask, doesn't she find it devastating, in a way, to let someone else enjoy and raise the ones she bore and nursed? For a paid professional with little real vested interest in her children's welfare to take up the lions' share of her children's time?

You mentioned that your sister is Catholic. Many homeschoolers I know do it for religious reasons, since they are vehemently opposed to their children being indoctrinated in pagan religions like humanism or statism. I'm all for finding the common ground, but I'm hard pressed to think of any religion-based appeals a known Flying Spaghetti Monsterist could make to a Catholic without standing out like Barney Fife's evil twin bumbling into a TCF meetup. Depends on how religious your sister is, whether she's got a sense of humor, and how much slack she'll cut you in a friendly conversation.

[tongue in cheek]
If your sister is a Bible-thumper AND a second amendment literalist, you can point out that the passage of scripture that says, "As arrows are in the hand of a mighty man, so are children of one's youth. Blessed is the man that hath his quiver full of them." (Psalm 127:4-5) So having your children taken away to be raised by strangers of dubious ideology is something akin to disarmament!

[tongue thunking further into cheek cavity]
Surrepetitiously leave a copy of the book Onto the Yellow School Bus and Through the Gates of Hell lying around at your sister's place.
[/tongue out of cheek]

Subtle hints are not my strong point - humor and shock value are my stock-in-trade tools for provoking sheep to thoughtfulness - but if I can think of anything else that might actually be useful, I'll get back to you.

I would second Ragnar Danneskjold's assertion that by not enforcing age segregation, learning at home can be much better preparation for life and the real world than institutionalized schooling. I haven't been to school since I was about as tall as my .22 carbine is long. One result was that I got to do all kinds of fascinating work and travel with my old man, which led into an equally fascinating career of my own. Learning a trade was great, but so were the opportunities to hang with my dad and to learn people skills in the real world.

Real-life education at home is like many "right" choices. Once your paradigm shifts, the list of "reasons", if you want to break it down into something simplistic, grows longer than both your arms. And then it ceases to be simple. You start to see the way the benefits are so interwoven with the rest of life, and vice versa, that it gets hard to explain it to someone who has a broken paradigm and who not only can't see a good-sized chunk of the greater tapestry, but is also squinting at the back side.

I've got to guard against waxing too poetic. The wax gums everything up after a while.

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Astroglide, Lazarus?
[/pre-emptive comeback to myself]

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slidemansailor

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Re: Help Me Write a Letter to My Nephew
« Reply #29 on: December 09, 2006, 08:30:59 pm »

Conventional K-12 segregates by age, not by interest, ability or any other real world criteria. Afterwards we are left to unsegregate our lives .. or not.  We end up with communities segregated by age, to the detriment of all age groups.

Home school and life segregate by interest and ability. That model should be attractive if it can be explained.

Perhaps the ticket would be help finding and affording karate, music and kid's club type activities that draw together many ages by criteria other than the simplistic age-grouping that government schools use.
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