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Author Topic: State homeschooling, or If You can't Beat 'Em Join 'Em  (Read 1703 times)

Brenda

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State homeschooling, or If You can't Beat 'Em Join 'Em
« on: September 28, 2006, 04:40:07 pm »

I just got an ad in the mail for a program called "Arizona Distance Learning," a program encouraging K-12 homeschooling using a state-provided curriculum. See it here. Dunno how to feel about this--it's obviously about catching kids who slipped through the cracks--but its very existance is an admission that children are better off at home.

Here's an example of the carrot they're offering:

Quote
Elementary Program

When you enroll your elementary child at Arizona Distance Learning, you receive:

    * access to our website with weekly lesson assignments in math, reading, writing, science, social studies, and fine arts
    * automatic enrollment in CompassLearning Odyssey, an interactive online K-6 curriculum
    * the loan of books and materials necessary to complete all lessons
    * opportunities to order additional materials through the Progress Points Program
    * access to ASSET, a library of educational videos
    * advice and guidance of a personal certified teacher
    * field trips and workshops
    * placement assessments and state testing
    * an online math tutor (5th and 6th graders)
    * ongoing technical support
    * links to other online educational resources
« Last Edit: September 28, 2006, 04:42:11 pm by Brenda »
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Joel

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Re: State homeschooling, or If You can't Beat 'Em Join 'Em
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2006, 04:49:23 pm »

Quote
Elementary Program

When you enroll your elementary child at Arizona Distance Learning, you receive:

    * access to our website with weekly lesson assignments in math, reading, writing, science, social studies, and fine arts
    * automatic enrollment in CompassLearning Odyssey, an interactive online K-6 curriculum
    * the loan of books and materials necessary to complete all lessons
    * opportunities to order additional materials through the Progress Points Program
    * access to ASSET, a library of educational videos
    * advice and guidance of a personal certified teacher
    * field trips and workshops
    * placement assessments and state testing
    * an online math tutor (5th and 6th graders)
    * ongoing technical support
    * links to other online educational resources

  • enrollment in the state "subversives" database, by SS#
  • monthly visits by qualified education enforcers
  • the undivided attention of "child welfare" bureaucrats
  • the illusion that you're doing something individualistic and antiauthoritarian, when you're really knuckling under
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Brenda

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Re: State homeschooling, or If You can't Beat 'Em Join 'Em
« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2006, 05:12:55 pm »

  • enrollment in the state "subversives" database, by SS#
  • monthly visits by qualified education enforcers
  • the undivided attention of "child welfare" bureaucrats
  • the illusion that you're doing something individualistic and antiauthoritarian, when you're really knuckling under

Yup. But they already monitor homeschoolers. I'm sure that eventually homeschooling will *only* be legal for people who comply with a program like this one; they're probably testing the waters to see how many they can catch with the carrot before they bring out the stick. But I'm in a strangely optimistic mood today and can't help thinking that at least this means more children who don't have to actually be *in* the schools.
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MSlee

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Re: State homeschooling, or If You can't Beat 'Em Join 'Em
« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2006, 09:40:54 pm »

Quote
Yup. But they already monitor homeschoolers. I'm sure that eventually homeschooling will *only* be legal for people who comply with a program like this one; they're probably testing the waters to see how many they can catch with the carrot before they bring out the stick. But I'm in a strangely optimistic mood today and can't help thinking that at least this means more children who don't have to actually be *in* the schools.

Sorry, Wrong.   

(Arizona State Homeschooling Laws)

Quote
g Options:  1 

   Option: 1
Legal Option:   Establish and operate a home school
Attendance:   None
Subjects:   Reading, Grammar, math, social studies and science
Qualifications:   None
Notice:   File a affidavit of intent with the local superintendent within 30 days of the start (even if instruction will be delayed until age 8) or end of home schooling
Recordkeeping:
   None
Testing:
   None
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MSlee

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Re: State homeschooling, or If You can't Beat 'Em Join 'Em
« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2006, 10:01:30 pm »

Sorry,

I didn't finish my post. (wasn't trying to be too flip,  my cat assistants were too helpful :rolleyes:)

What I was going to say is that it looks like Arizona isn't regulated.

This is just an out and out "bait and switch" situtation.

I live in MS they are starting this kind of program here.
 The hurricane made too many children move around.........They (the state) can't track them
 The hurricane made too many gov. institutes/schools into little tiny pieces of rubble...... no where to shove the bodies.
 The hurricane is costing the state money........a computer and internet costs the state wayyyyyy less than the 7k=8k a "normal" students does.(bonus the state gets to keep the difference)
OBTW the cameras they hook up to the computers for classes are two-way.

Also on the issue of cost we had the state ed budget going bankrupt in March because they couldn't afford gas for the buses.
 They are touting how this offers sooo much more for the rural students!!!

A few points to consider:

* If you participate in one of these programs, HSLDA will not represent your family as HSers. 
* You are right about the carrot and stick.  In other states where students who signed up initially were allowed to pick and choose curriculum, the state incrementally allowed participation' only if you jumped through more and more hoops and partook of their, indoctrination, I mean educational recommendations.
* This is a huge financial boon to any local gov. that can get families to participate.  They get the same money but don't have to pay infrastructure.  (think of all the money left to pay "monitors" to wander about the state checking up on everyone)
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