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Author Topic: Invisibility Cloak For Cameras  (Read 1889 times)

unstructuredreality

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Invisibility Cloak For Cameras
« on: May 18, 2004, 01:15:18 pm »

http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/05/17/...4646114738.html
http://securityfocus.com/news/8575
It's a start:)  you'd be surprised at how many don't encrypt.

The exploit allows users to jam all wireless devices within a one kilometre radius using any wireless-enabled computing device and can take down an entire network in seconds if the base station is within range. The source of such an attack would be extremely difficult to trace and network recovery is immediate, making it appear to administrators as simply network congestion.
A hand-held device could be used to temporarily jam wireless security cameras or disrupt a wireless network at a critical moment to create a diversion or cover unauthorised activity. Such a device could be pre-programmed or activated remotely using GPRS.
As the exploit can be targeted at specific networks, it could be used to hijack users by jamming a wireless network and causing wireless devices to automatically detect and connect to a fake network, the default setting for most wireless devices.

"Any organisation that continues to use the standard wireless technology, 802.11b, to operate critical infrastructure couldbe considered negligent," Looi says.

Good Day
« Last Edit: May 18, 2004, 01:35:46 pm by unstructuredreality »
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Roy J. Tellason

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Invisibility Cloak For Cameras
« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2004, 08:18:57 pm »

Quote
http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/05/17/...4646114738.html
http://securityfocus.com/news/8575
It's a start:)  you'd be surprised at how many don't encrypt.

The exploit allows users to jam all wireless devices within a one kilometre radius using any wireless-enabled computing device and can take down an entire network in seconds if the base station is within range. The source of such an attack would be extremely difficult to trace and network recovery is immediate, making it appear to administrators as simply network congestion.
A hand-held device could be used to temporarily jam wireless security cameras or disrupt a wireless network at a critical moment to create a diversion or cover unauthorised activity. Such a device could be pre-programmed or activated remotely using GPRS.
As the exploit can be targeted at specific networks, it could be used to hijack users by jamming a wireless network and causing wireless devices to automatically detect and connect to a fake network, the default setting for most wireless devices.

"Any organisation that continues to use the standard wireless technology, 802.11b, to operate critical infrastructure couldbe considered negligent," Looi says.

Good Day
That first link took darn near forever to load,  then displayed a screenful of garbage.  Maybe saving it and looking at the source later will prove informative,  I don't know...

The second one needs a subscription to access.

Damn these publications anyhow,  they're getting to be a real pain in the butt,  especially if you don't want their cookies.
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