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Author Topic: another reason to have a ghost address  (Read 3321 times)

byron mc

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another reason to have a ghost address
« on: June 27, 2008, 02:38:24 pm »

Finally he discovered a Web site seemingly tailor-made for such suburban woes.
http://www.komonews.com/news/tech/22043504.html



If something like this you are involved in even indirectly at least you will be protected in your mail and financial dealings.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2008, 02:04:46 pm by byron m »
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vonuvan

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Re: another reason to have a ghost address - website
« Reply #1 on: June 27, 2008, 07:25:17 pm »


Finally he discovered a Web site seemingly tailor-made for such suburban woes.
http://www.komonews.com/news/tech/22043504.html



If something like this you are involved in even indirectly at least you will be protected in your mail and financial dealings.

It would be faster and easier to use one's stereo with some cheap outdoor speakers and a code oscillator retuned to produce supersonic sounds at levels high enough to drive the pooches into silence or further from the failed sleeper.
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byron mc

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The College Credit-Card Hustle & even before college
« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2008, 02:19:54 pm »

Quote
Universities and their alumni associations have discovered an unlikely and disturbing source of revenue: Increasingly, they are selling students' personal information to big credit-card companies eager for young customers.


Using state public disclosure laws, BusinessWeek has obtained more than two dozen confidential contracts between major schools and card-issuing banks keen to sign up undergraduates with mounting expenses for tuition, books, and travel. In some instances, universities and alumni groups receive larger payments from the banks if students use their school-branded cards more frequently.

BusinessWeek's investigation parallels a separate probe by New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo. He is looking into a range of relationships between schools and financial institutions. "It seems that the schools are simply selecting the university credit card based on who pays the school the most, and that may not be best for students,

Some of the country's best-known and largest schools have multimillion-dollar credit-card deals, including the Universities of Michigan, Minnesota, and South Florida. Private schools also have these typically secret deals, but information about public institutions is more readily obtainable under disclosure laws.

Alumni groups often take the lead in arranging for so-called affinity credit cards, many of them decorated with school mascots and logos. Schools usually approve the contracts and provide access to student information such as e-mail addresses and phone numbers.

According to BofA, which dominates the campus market with more than 700 affinity deals, the primary targets are alumni and college sports fans, who hold 96% of the cards


Iowa stopped providing student information to BofA last November, but only after negative local press coverage.

The College Credit-Card Hustle
Jul 18,  2008
http://news.yahoo.com/s/bw/20080718/bs_bw/0830b4093038700850;_ylt=AhUjT25bI2ykAYtpTC3r8XqyBhIF

the article is pretty long actually.

The vast majority of B students or better graded in high school will attend college.
Raising awareness of mail privacy before they even apply to college will help them for years.

High School Students should get a ghost address in their town and when they turn 18 change over any bank accounts to that address immediately.
High School students would benefit from a real ghost address in their own town before sending off college applications with a money order payment.
If a student uses a ghost address even 1 town away there may be a red flag for College Admissions as to why the town does not match the location of the high school.
Once this student sends in his applications for colleges, is accepted, and then moves to the college town, setting up a CMRA should be a first thing upon arrival in town or even in advance.
Any credit card marketing/promotions/credit reporting agencies selling data would go to the young adult's Ghost address or CMRA.
For any ghosters whose family will be attending college in late August perhaps you want to suggest setting up a CMRA the 1st day of arrival, or else even months before as soon as a letter of acceptance is received.

The other plus is that any roommates after living in a dorm situation won't have access to the young adult's mail in an apartment situation with a shared apartment mailbox.

The other benefit is year-round mail can continue even if the student is out of town for 3 months in the summer. The same address can be kept at the CMRA in the college town for a few years and would be semi-convienent near local stores. Perhaps mail forwarding can be setup for summer months or winter vacation?
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