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Author Topic: Pre-1898 gun sources  (Read 9602 times)

socalserf

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Pre-1898 gun sources
« on: October 17, 2009, 11:08:18 am »

The Pre-1899 Antique Guns FAQ¬  by James Wesley, Rawles
http://www.rawles.to/Pre-1899_FAQ.html
Quote
Q:  What constitutes "antique" under U.S. law?

A: Although your State and local laws may vary, any firearm with a frame or receiver that actually made before Jan. 1, 1899 is legally "antique" and not considered a "firearm" under Federal law. This refers to the actual date of manufacture of the receiver/frame, not just model year or patent date marked. (For example, only ***low serial number*** Winchester Model 1894 lever actions are actually antique.)  No FFL is required to buy or sell antiques across state lines. They are in the same legal category as a muzzle loading replica. I regularly ship them right to people's doorstep via UPS, with no "paper trail." Think of it as the last bastion of gun ownership and transfer privacy.

Dealers;
Pat Burns, mostly Finnish m-39 Mosin-Nagant, but sometimes others. Check often.
http://www.gunsnammo.com/

Antique Fire Arms
http://www.antiquearmsinc.com/

Sportsmans Guide
http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/pre-1898-mauser-95-308-rifle.aspx?a=556539&pn=1

Empire Arms, (sometimes)
http://www.empirearms.com/

There are lots of Antique Gun dealers, but most sell high value collectables, not utilitarian work rifles.
http://www.gunhoo.com/gunhoo/t.collectible.htm

You will also note that pre-1898 fire arms come at a premium.
Post 1898 Mauser '98 rifles can be had today at about $159 plus S&H.
https://www.southernohiogun.com/index.php/longguns-1/yugo-mauser-mod-24-47-8mm-k98.html

And WWII Ruski Mosin-Nagants can be had all day long for less than $100.
http://www.jgsales.com/product_info.php/c/c-r-guns/p/mosin-nagant-91-30-round-receiver-rifle%2C-7-62x54r-caliber-/cPath/290/products_id/1041
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Clip Johnson

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Re: Pre-1898 gun sources
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2009, 11:54:06 am »

Excellent resources there Socalserf.

I would like to add one more from the area where I grew up, and have known of them all my life.

http://www.dixiegun.com/

Lots of collectibles, and non-collectibles alike, as well as lots of other neat stuff.
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socalserf

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Re: Pre-1898 gun sources
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2009, 12:16:24 pm »

Excellent resources there Socalserf.

I would like to add one more from the area where I grew up, and have known of them all my life.

http://www.dixiegun.com/

Lots of collectibles, and non-collectibles alike, as well as lots of other neat stuff.

Thanks for the link. Add as many as you can find.
(I love Dixie's replicas, if only I had more money!)
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socalserf

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Re: Pre-1898 gun sources
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2009, 06:33:59 pm »

There is an interesting article about a book called;
Rifles of the White Death
A Collector's Guide to Finnish Military Rifles 1918-1944
By Doug Bowser.
Quote

While not dealing specifically with sniping, Rifles of the White Death does provide an interesting look at one of the world's most accurate military service rifles. Without a doubt, the rifles of Finland have long held a reputation for high quality and accuracy. In a day when the best a person might expect of a typical military rifle was a 4 inch group at 100 yards, the Finns would not accept a rifle into service unless it could fire three shots in a 1.5" circle at 100 meters. By today's standard, that may not seem like a great achievement, but when you consider that the Finns were basing their rifle on the Mosin-Nagant action first designed in 1891, one must sit up and take notice.

Rifles of the White Death traces the interesting history of Finnish arms development as well as Finland's amazing national history. While the book is geared toward the firearms collector, it does have merit for the non-collector interested in world history. The story of Finland is greatly unknown to the modern day shooter, which is sad. The history of Finland is one filled with determination, a continual fight for freedom, ingenuity and incredible military feats against terrible odds. I would not call this a gripping read -- after all, the book is mainly about the variations in specific collectable arms. Still, the facts presented within the pages are valuable and interesting enough to help change your world view. Finland is probably the only nation in the world to be invaded by the Soviet Union and remain sovereign. During two separate wars, the Finns bloodied the Russian forces to the extent that the Soviets had to except a less-than-ideal victory. Expecting an easy rollover, Stalin invaded Finland in November of 1939. The prognosis was a 16-day victory. As the war rolled on past that optimistic deadline, the Finn forces managed a kill ratio of 40 Soviets for every Finn soldier killed. Of the 1,500,000 man invading army, the Russians lost 1,000,000. In total, the Finns lost 25,000 men. The bravery and determination of the Finnish soldier should be a continual lesson to anyone who values freedom. Their fighting skill and excellent marksmanship decimated their enemy. After the Winter War of 1939 and 1940, a Russian general was quoted as having said, "We gained 22,000 miles of new territory. Just enough to bury our dead".


http://www.snipercountry.com/BVT_Reviews/RiflesWhiteDeath.asp

Dealers;
Pat Burns, mostly Finnish m-39 Mosin-Nagant, but sometimes others. Check often.
http://www.gunsnammo.com/

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