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Author Topic: MamaLiberty's new story  (Read 62526 times)

Rarick

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Re: MamaLiberty's new story
« Reply #135 on: July 01, 2010, 05:21:04 am »

Maybe.  What kind of trade goods do the traders have, and how good are they when it comes to origins.  Several communities dropped of the radio net, why?  The traders managed to survive, but how?  Sometimes one mans trader is another man's raider, look at the reniasance/new world eras.  Rais the spanish, trade the goods to the english/french, or any other leg of that triangle.........

I would expect to know the traders for several visits before being too enthusiastic about a new set of neighbors.
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Most of the time news is about the same old violations of the first principles of consent and golden rule with a dash of force thrown in........ with just enough duct tape to be believable.

MamaLiberty

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Re: MamaLiberty's new story
« Reply #136 on: July 01, 2010, 07:19:29 am »

Maybe.  What kind of trade goods do the traders have, and how good are they when it comes to origins. 

I think I described clearly what the "ranch" people had to offer, but may need to expand on what the traders bring in. It was referred to several times as things that the ranch people couldn't manufacture - such as coffee, sugar, salt, needles, thread, fuel, stuff like that. Don't really understand what you mean by "origins." The traders are going all over the country where they can, picking up all sorts of things. Under the circumstances, I very much doubt anyone is going to be concerned that the needles were manufactured in China before the crash. They'll just be damned glad to have needles!

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Several communities dropped of the radio net, why?

Who knows? I don't. Some may have just had too much else to do just surviving, and some may have lost the ability to produce enough electricity. As with other mysteries, some of these answers my show up later. :) And remember the solar storm that knocked out radios in a wide swath once. Many may have been damaged beyond the ability of the survivors to repair or keep repaired.

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The traders managed to survive, but how? 

Obviously by being smart and having enough manpower to protect themselves from raiders. And, just as obvious, they were not "traders" before the crash. They survived somehow, where they were, and decided that being traders was a good idea under the new circumstances. Will have to explore covering this in their conversation with the ranch council.

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Sometimes one mans trader is another man's raider, look at the reniasance/new world eras.  Rais the spanish, trade the goods to the english/french, or any other leg of that triangle.........

Sure, and each person and community would have to be wary of such... and take responsibility for their own defense.

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I would expect to know the traders for several visits before being too enthusiastic about a new set of neighbors.

I thought it was pretty obvious that these traders had been coming around for at least two years. Can probably make that clearer.

Thanks SO MUCH for your input. :)
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Rarick

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Re: MamaLiberty's new story
« Reply #137 on: July 02, 2010, 05:21:21 am »

Okay- I tend to be a paranoid SOB.......
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Most of the time news is about the same old violations of the first principles of consent and golden rule with a dash of force thrown in........ with just enough duct tape to be believable.

MamaLiberty

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Re: MamaLiberty's new story
« Reply #138 on: July 02, 2010, 05:59:46 am »

Okay- I tend to be a paranoid SOB.......

LOL!!! Somehow, your comments stimulated the ghost, and the new chapter is all about your concerns re the traders. I thought it was going somewhere else... but I just never know. Thanks again. :)
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coloradohermit

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Re: MamaLiberty's new story
« Reply #139 on: July 02, 2010, 07:03:50 am »

Somehow, your comments stimulated the ghost,
Who knew that you could tickle a ghost's fancy. Learn something new every day. I'm looking forward to more.
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MamaLiberty

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Re: MamaLiberty's new story
« Reply #140 on: July 02, 2010, 04:08:17 pm »

Eternal Vigilance

Evan, just 16, slipped quietly away from his family's cabin as the last of the sunset faded from the sky. He was excited to have finally gotten away without being noticed, and eagerly anticipated meeting his friends out beyond the old barn. Someone had said they'd stolen a small keg of beer, and another had bragged he had something good to smoke.

He didn't give a thought to his mother's warning that he was courting trouble, or that some of his friends were taking foolish chances. He didn't want to hear caution or wisdom or anything but the beat of his young blood and the sound of his own drummer. He was all set to fulfill the old maxim that good judgment is mostly a matter of surviving a lot of bad judgment.

Slipping into the gathering quietly, Evan soon realized that few of his friends were present.  Most of these men had come with the traders last year, along with a few drifters that had been taken in last winter, since extra hands were almost always welcome for the unending toil of building their town and getting the necessary work done to feed them all.

He took a mug of beer without qualm, but didn't like the smell of the fat, untidy cigar that was being passed around and handed it to the next person without a pause.

Two of the older men obviously had set themselves up as the "boss" and his second. Some, mostly the younger ones, were actually deferring to them in a manner Evan found disgusting, but he didn't want to give it any thought. The beer was good, and he didn't have any interest in being a toady to anyone, so he figured it didn't affect him.

But soon he realized that most of the conversation was composed of dirty jokes and increasingly vicious slander against Bradshaw and the town. Making an effort to listen more closely through the buzz of the alcohol, Evan soon decided that he didn't like what was going on, but he wasn't really sure just how to extricate himself.

He was glad he'd remained on the edge of the group, and decided to pretend to be drunk. Laying down behind a hay bale, he imitated a soft snore and was gratified to hear the two men who had been closest to him laughing about the kid who couldn't hold his liquor. They moved off, but just as Evan had decided to leave, it occurred to him that he should really listen as long as he could. He hadn't yet formed the idea of telling anyone about what he learned, just had always been one who liked to "know" and often heard more than he was meant to.

The moon rose, and the wolf song in the distant foothills reminded everyone that fall would come soon. The air got cool, and Evan almost fell asleep before he began to hear the real meat of the older men's discussion.

"You as tired as I am of all this goody council stuff and them working us to the bone day in and day out?" Simon, the "boss," was supposedly speaking to his friend, but most of the others gave grunts or words of agreement. "We should just up and take our share and get out of here," he continued.

A few wondered what their "share" might be and, more important, how they would get away if they got their hands on it. This broke down into half a dozen separate conversations, but Simon thumped on a log for their attention. Only a few even thought to consider just where they might go with this loot. Not one of them gave a thought to the fact that they might easily die in the coming winter without the solid backing of a well provisioned community.

The "boss" spoke ever more quietly, and Evan couldn't hear much, but he got the impression that this gang would soon decide on what they would take and how to go about it. He didn't think he needed to stick around any longer, so he very carefully crawled to the far corner of the barn, and then around to the open door. After a long pause to catch his breath and look for any sign of someone watching him, he rose to his feet and softly walked away toward the town.

Suddenly, a very strong, hairy arm grabbed his neck from the back. Stepping back, into the attack as he'd been taught, his elbow connected with the man's solar plexus and he went down without a sound. Turning, he saw his attacker on the ground, breathless and in a daze. He was about to continue to the HQ when a small figure sprang from the dark and hit the man over the head with a stout branch.

Blood spurted everywhere, and Donald was instantly covered with it. His face remained resolute, but he was obviously shocked at the results of his impetuous action. "I thought he was going to kill you!" he said, and tossed the branch aside.

"Come on!" Evan whispered frantically, "We've got to warn Mr. Bradshaw and Dad. Putting words into action, he grabbed his brother's arm and they both dashed down the path. "You go wake Dad," Evan commanded, "I'll get Mr. Bradshaw and the sheriff.

Donald vanished into the gloom between the buildings just as Evan began to pound on the HQ side door that led to the Bradshaw quarters. A light came on instantly, and he was glad to see that Mutt was there too. They urged him to get his breathing under control, and then listened carefully to everything he said without any interruption.

Mutt spoke quietly into the hand held radio, and nodded to Roger as he went out. Charlie arrived a few moments later and, after indulging in one "I'll speak to you later" look at Evan, departed to join his militia company. 

Roger thanked the young man for the information, and then suggested he might want to go home and reassure his mother since Donald's bloody condition was apt to have upset her. Evan just nodded and went out, briefly thinking about his father's probable reaction... but mostly processing a lot of other things like his growing rebellion - previously justified as just being independent - and how all that was apt to relate to his application for adult status. He hadn't really given it much thought before, and now he was worried.

Donald was already in bed when Evan came in, and he was glad that his mother didn't say anything except suggest he follow suit after she heard a little of his adventures. He had expected tears or scolding, and was humbled by her warm hug and look of patient understanding as he followed his little brother into the loft where they slept.
*****

Mutt and the militia had called on sheriff Richard to help round up the malcontents that night. The man who had been hit was gone, but the trail of blood led them to a corner of the old barn and a stranger who had a heck of a headache. He was in no condition to resist, and only a few of the others managed to slip away. Mutt and Richard conferred on the best way to contain the men, and decided just to take their names and descriptions before letting them go. They could not determine who had stolen the beer, and the only other actual crime committed had been the attack on Evan, so the bloody stranger was the only one locked in an empty shed for the rest of the night.

The news passed quickly through the community and soon came word that a special shareholder's meeting was to be held late that afternoon. All of the men who had been apprehended behind the barn were asked to attend and informed that failure to appear would result in automatic expulsion from the community. Some of the older men packed their personal property and left with Simon in his dilapidated old pickup after they were warned never to return for any reason.

Roger had communicated by radio with Daniel in East Valley. He had agreed to come to the meeting because his people were involved. Mutt had spread the word to all of the other towns around about the undesirables that might be headed their way.

The sound system was set up on the stage at the fairgrounds, the old hay field used for various community functions. There was not a single building large enough to contain even a third of the community now, so everyone was glad that the mild weather was holding.

The council president called them to order, and offered the traditional moment of silence, then gave the microphone to the sheriff. He gave a good summary of the situation and then called Evan and his brother to tell their stories.

Evan was horrified at first, and only a stern look from his father brought him to his feet. But as he mounted the steps to the stage, he realized that this was part of being an adult and he knew that he would never hide behind his family again. He'd waited all day for his father to explode, but nothing had been said - which made it worse. Charlie couldn't have said anything he hadn't said to himself already.

Glossing over his reasons for attending the clandestine gathering, he clearly stated what he had heard, and then all about the attack as he was leaving. He said he knew that Donald had struck a man who was down, but he hoped it could be overlooked because the boy had thought his brother was still in danger.

There were a few questions from sheriff Richard about small details, and one from a council member. Unasked, Evan apologized for his original participation in the ugly affair, and promised to devote the rest of his life to being a responsible member of the community.  Looking at his father just then, Evan was surprised to see the little half smile that marked occasions when he'd especially pleased his parents. He stood up tall then and marched down the steps with a new assertive stride, so unlike the slouched and bored disdain he'd imitated before. Evan didn't realize the change... but it was not lost on anyone else.

With the encouragement of his father and his old friend Bill, Donald then went up and told his story. Over the last few years he'd gotten more comfortable talking to other people, but seeing this many in front of him was almost paralyzing. His big brother had impressed him with his new found maturity, however, and for almost the first time in his life Donald wanted to be just like him. So, he stood up straight and told his story, his young voice breaking as he frankly described his anger and fear when the man had grabbed his brother. Roger questioned him gently and briefly, seeking to make sure the young man knew the difference between defensive action and aggression. Satisfied, he and Bill watched with pride as Donald walked down the steps, doing his best to imitate Evan. Charlie hugged Cathy, and they both displayed suitably modest grins.

Randy, the stranger who had attacked Evan, was brought forward and invited to tell his story. He stood there and glared at Richard and then at the council. "You all think you're so hot," he sneered. "Well, me and the rest of the boys won't forget this little caper."

When it was clear he had no intention of participating honestly, he was removed from the stage to be held in custody by the sheriff. After a sincere discussion of the options, a poll was taken of the shareholders. Banishment or execution were the only options, and they all knew it had to be unanimous. It took four votes, but in the end he was banished and warned never to return.

Then he was turned loose. His surprise was evident, but it didn't take him long to realize that every hand was potentially against him here. He would receive fair treatment, but nobody would have anything more to do with him and they would not hesitate to kill him if he threatened anyone else.

The three young men who belonged to the Bradshaw Ranch community were judged next. They all made abject apologies to everyone and vowed never to participate in such an underhanded affair again. The council took the vote, and all were reinstated. But the boys knew they would be watched for quite a while so it was a seriously sobering experience.

The other six followed Randy's pattern and either sneered or made threats. Only one vote was necessary for the shareholders to expel them all from the community.

A difficulty arose because none of the men had any transportation. Some had come in with Simon, and others with the traders, but none of them had any way to go anywhere else. The council discussed the fact that sending them away on foot might well be a death sentence, especially this late in the year. They also didn't like the idea of these malcontents hanging around the area, but nobody could come up with a better idea.

Daniel stood and raised his hand for recognition and the council was glad to hear what he might propose. Jumping up on the stage, he took the microphone and paused to organize his thoughts.

"I feel terrible that this happened, and partly responsible because some of my employees were involved. I never saw this Randy before, but I know his type and it would be a very bad idea to have him lurking around all winter. While they can obviously choose to just walk away from here, I offer to take them with me south. I have one more trip to make and they can work for me for the transport. Then I can leave them where they at least won't freeze this winter. It will be up to them to find another community or make it on their own."

The council and shareholders were grateful for this solution. The expelled men didn't seem to be appreciating it much, though they all agreed to it in the end. None of them were stupid enough to think they could face a Wyoming winter on foot, on their own.

As Richard left the fairgrounds with Mutt and the others, his thoughts turned to speculation on possible future mischief from Simon and his cohorts. They'd have to keep their eyes peeled, for sure.
****

The winter solstice came with a brief snowstorm in the early morning, and then the sun shown brightly on the fresh blanket of soft snow all over town. This was the second annual "Turning day," where young people were formally accepted into the community as adults. All of the votes had been counted long ago, and while there had been some anxiety by one candidate in the beginning, all nine of the young men and women had finally been accepted. Today they would be recognized by the community and make statements if they chose to do so.

Since there was no building large enough to hold them all now, the snow had been scraped from the fairgrounds and a large fire laid in the center of the field beyond the stage. The ceremony would not take long, and nobody wanted to miss it, so nearly every living soul in the community braved the cold and were soon assembled.

Just after noon the nine candidates stood on the stage with their parents or guardians, suffering the cheers, jokes and teasing of both peers and elders with varying degrees of embarrassment or feigned aplomb. As rites of passage go it was a benign and joyful occasion, and none of them would have had it any other way.

As was the custom, most of them spoke briefly about their plans for the future, and one couple announced their engagement. Shouts, cheers and good natured laughter greeted each speech, and none of the new adults had any doubt that they were accepted and treasured by the community.

After the ceremony, those involved went home to their personal celebrations and everyone else got back to work. Before they left the stage, Charlie had held out his open hand to his eldest son in the ancient traditional gesture of equals. One adult to another, they solemnly shook hands and then engulfed each other in a family hug. Charlie was a little shocked to realize that his son was now a bit taller than he was.

Donald had pretty much gone back to being just Donald, but he watched his big brother with renewed respect and love. He wasn't thinking about all the growing up he still had to do to reach his own "Turning day." His thoughts were of his latest experiments and the new place in the woods he'd found for his private musings and play. He would not be allowed to go there again until spring and the departure of the wolves, but that didn't discourage his active mind from making plans.

Cathy and Charlie walked toward their cabin hand in hand, as on so many other occasions. They joined with Jeff, Maria and many others in celebration of this vital milestone of their new life.

Evan trailed behind the rest of them, casting brief glances at a girl named Margaret in another group. "I wonder how I can get to talk to her," he mused.

Margaret was aware of the glances and smiled to herself. "I wonder how long before he talks to me," she whispered to her sister.

They laughed and hurried toward their cabin, eager for the fire and an opportunity to talk about the boys... as their ancestors had done since the dawn of time.

[Don't know if there will be any more right now. This might be a good place to quit, but we'll see what the ghost wants to do tomorrow. "I" have some ideas, but they've not done me any good before, so who knows? LOL]
« Last Edit: July 02, 2010, 05:38:23 pm by MamaLiberty »
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MamaLiberty

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Re: MamaLiberty's new story
« Reply #141 on: July 07, 2010, 03:16:57 pm »

New Beginnings

Betty woke to another day, unusually tired. She wasn't sleeping well, and she had been irritable for days now. Roger's place in the big log bed was empty, as usual these days. He had gone through a period of self doubt and adjustment as the community grew, but had now pretty much returned to normal. She wished she could do that.

Her mother had experienced an early menopause, and Betty was terrified that she was about to go through the same thing. Only 46, she dreaded the hot flashes and mood swings sure to come. The prospect of dealing with all that, probably for years, in the face of all her work and responsibility in the ranch community made her cringe and want to hide beneath the covers, but she resolutely put them aside and got up to start her day.

Lauri and her team were busy in the old community kitchen. The school was putting on a parent's night and they'd decided to have a pot luck supper along with it, so much of the cooking and baking were being done early. Many of the original settlers missed the old community meals and took every opportunity to get together like this.

Pacing with a cup of tea, Betty looked out the big east windows of the dining room at the falling snow. This February wasn't as brutal as the last two had been, but they would have more than sufficient snow pack for a good water supply, and the wolves had not been nearly such a problem this winter.

Suddenly somewhat nauseated, she dumped the rest of the tea and headed for the radio room. She had put herself back on the regular duty roster last fall when one of the girls who usually worked the radio had been sick. She'd realized she missed talking to all the other communities, so had stayed on the list.

Sitting at the radio, she went through the notes of the previous shift and scribbled some of her own as she talked to her assigned frequencies. There was no particular news, and everyone was as anxious as she for the spring to come - as always. She reached for a new pen and, not getting a good grasp on it, dropped it. When she bent over to retrieve it, she threw up the little tea she had swallowed earlier.
.
Roger happened to enter the room at the same time, and he rushed to her aid. "What's the matter?" he said.

"I don't know," she replied. "I'm just feeling crappy."

"Let's get you over to see the doc, honey," he insisted. And this time she didn't protest or argue - which worried him even more.

Betty endured the thorough examination and the worried look on Roger's face when they came out of the examining room. Rachel, the doctor, sat down at her desk and briefly reviewed her notes.

"From what you tell me, Betty, there is a faint possibility of menopause onset, but I'll lay my bets on something quite different. In my professional opinion - absent all the tests we used to have - you are about 3 to 6 weeks pregnant."

Absolute stunned silence reigned for at least a full minute. Roger had been holding Betty's hand and he suddenly realized he was holding on too hard so he tried to let go. Betty had gone rigid, then limp, but clung to his hand as if it were a life line. They both looked at the doctor as if they'd seen a ghost.

Rachel smiled, then suggested that Betty consult with the herbalist about something to control the nausea, assuring her that it was most likely temporary. "Simple morning sickness," she said.

Thanking her, they left hand in hand and went back to their room where they could speak privately. If Rachel was right, they would have a great many adjustments to make. Roger was torn between the wildest joy and terrible fear for Betty. He knew that a first child at her age was not either comfortable or particularly safe - and not safe for the baby either. They discussed the potential for Down's Syndrome and other things, then explored the changes that would have to be made in their living arrangements. Neither one even mentioned the idea that Rachel had been wrong. They knew in their hearts that she was right, however improbably it might be.
*****

That spring brought an absolute orgy of building and changes. A new home was started across the street from the original headquarters, which was soon almost gutted and the scene of massive remodeling. With walls removed and heavy columns installed to support the roof, the bulk of the old HQ was turned into a very large room that would serve as both meeting and dining room. The kitchen was expanded, and an addition went up to house the radio equipment and, hopefully, someday the computer.

Roger and Betty moved into their new home from temporary quarters in an old cabin as spring ended. The new place wasn't really very large, but it had a wide porch around three sides and they had been careful to leave a few mature trees at suitable places around it. Two bedrooms and an extra room for storage were a luxury Betty hadn't even dreamed of since the original conversion of their former home, and she was overwhelmed by the outpouring of both love and material gifts from the people of the community.

The beautiful pine floors were dotted with colorful home made rugs, and each window was delightfully draped with home woven fabric. Hand crafted furniture graced every room. Two easy chairs had been fashioned and covered with glowing leather. There were boxes of things she hadn't even had time to unpack, including a large number of baby garments, blankets and so much more that she would need.

Betty complained about not being allowed to lift or do much, but would not hear of giving up her shift at the radio. She convinced them, rightly, that she needed that activity and involvement now as much as ever.

For the first three months, Roger nearly wore himself out rushing back and forth between various projects and his wife's side, until she finally convinced him that she was doing well and he was being silly. She had only to ask, and any number of her neighbors would have done anything they possibly could to help her or give her company. She'd never felt so well loved.

Spring slid into summer and everyone was busy as usual with the farming, animals and building projects. The traders made their regular treks, and people went back and forth between Bradshaw town and East Valley. Half a dozen weddings were performed, and twice as many new infants as usual were welcomed into the community. There was talk of building a church, but the new school was chosen as a priority. The contributions for the school were sufficient to build, furnish and supply it for at least a full year and the teachers moved in gratefully. The previous building was given over to the growing medical community and remodeled into a clinic and hospital. The former meeting room was divided into offices for the various doctors, midwives, herbalists and other health practitioners. Betty's original dream of having a birthing center there became a reality.

The apprentice program was working wonderfully, and there were usually more positions available than young people to fill them. They had recruited so much from other communities that many of them started their own programs in order to keep their children at home. The rivalry was friendly, but serious, especially with the East Valley which was rapidly growing and might soon overtake the ranch in population numbers.

The council met regularly, but real problems were few because people worked out their differences privately or with arbitrators. Richard resigned as sheriff, to be effective that fall. He'd had so little to do that he wanted to go back to full time construction work. Nobody else was nominated, and the office would remain vacant unless another need for it arose.

The militia continued to meet and train, but their numbers had dropped off significantly in the last year as well. Mutt and his closest friends continued to patrol at night, and knew that many others would respond immediately if either wolves or goblins became a hazard again.
****

The old gray gelding leaned against the fence and watched the children leading the rapidly growing foals around the main pasture. He was fully retired now, having been injured in a wolf attack the winter before. The injury healed, but he was not judged sound enough to ride. Nobody would have dared suggest that he be put down, however, and Roger was not apt to ever forget that he had saved David's life.

Donald was part of the growing group of youngsters who worked for Bill after school and during other spare time. They were responsible for handling the foals and getting them halter broken. This was a tremendous service to the men who would later train them, and also to the foals because it reduced their stress and potential injury during training. Properly handled and cared for, they would have little or no fear of the men or the harness they would be required to carry when the time came.

The sun was dipping deeply into the west on a glorious summer day as the last of the foals were groomed and turned loose into their own special pasture to squeal and nip at each other over the grain ration. Donald lingered just a few moments to watch them, hoping that Bill might come out of the barn in time to walk with him back to the house. He loved any excuse to visit Bill and Linda, and to play big brother to the two pink and gold little girls.

Eventually, that hope died and he began the walk to town, tempted to go the long way around the new school so he could stop in to see his brother Evan, and Margaret his new wife. Seeing that the sun was lower than he'd thought, and knowing his mother would be anxious if he didn't come home on time for dinner, he decided against it. Swinging into an easy stride, he loped for home and came up onto the porch only slightly winded. He loved to run now, and was mostly unconscious of his growing stature and stamina. He was becoming an exceptionally well made young man.

Hope, now a precocious four year old, ambushed her brother and squealed with delight as he tickled her. Then, quickly going to wash up, he hugged his mother and grinned at his father as he slid into his place. It still seemed really strange not to see Evan at the table. Cathy smiled at all of them and settled the kettle of stew in the center of the table, then began to dish it out.

Next door, Maria was getting her children settled around the table for their evening meal. Boosting Elizabeth into her special chair, she called the other two children again. Angel didn't want to stop playing with the old dog, and Sean was jealous because he considered the dog to be his own special property. They fought like any siblings, and Maria could only be glad that Angel had become a very normal little girl, in spite of all the trauma she had lived through. At seven, she was becoming more and more independent and willful, but Maria could only see that as a good thing. She knew it worried Jeff sometimes, but his love for them all never wavered.

Down the street, just past the oldest storage building, Lauri and her dog wearily made their way toward her cabin near the center of town. She smiled to think that it had once been on the very edge, near the main road, but now she could see the twinkling lights of all the new houses and mobile homes that had been built or brought in over the last few years. They stretched out to the base of the foothills on the north, and around the bend in the road to the east and almost to the farms on the west. The broken land to the south was safe from building, she supposed, but time would tell. She thought they might have a thousand people in the town now.

Her new husband opened the door as she mounted the porch, and he smiled a quiet greeting as she described the fish she had caught that day. Bob was blind, and seldom ventured out of the house, but he was very interested in all the people and goings on in the town. His work room was always busy as people brought him things to be repaired or picked up completed jobs, and many stayed a while to watch his patient work using only the touch of his hands to "see" and fix the problems. His two busy apprentices kept things moving smoothly, and they had become almost like sons to the older couple.

Lauri hugged him as she went out to the kitchen and put the fish in a hot pan to fry for their supper. Bob had harvested some squash and snap beans from their little garden, so she set them to steam with some new potatoes and then set the table. The dog looked out from behind the wood box, taking in the good smells, but knowing he was not allowed to beg.

Bill and Linda worked together effortlessly after such long practice, and both girls were fed and put to bed in record time. Later, sitting out on the porch in the cooling evening air, Linda gave her husband the wonderful news that the girls would have a brother or sister before spring, and he was as happy as she could have wished. She wouldn't have traded her daughters for anything, but hoped she would have a single boy this time. Another set of twins would be too much.

Richard and Deborah watched their sturdy son, Adam, play on the floor with the big cloth "emapunt" he had been given for his birthday. He was especially intrigued by the long trunk and big floppy ears, and jealously guarded his treasure from the puppy that would have loved to chew on it. The stuffed elephant had been intended to help keep the youngster from playing too rough with the puppy, and Deb was very glad to see that it had worked even better than she hoped.

Eventually, Adam drifted off to sleep with his head cradled on the toy, and Deb gently bundled him into bed with it. The puppy curled up on the rug to wait patiently for its young master to resume their play.

And so it went, from house to house, all over the valley. People going about their everyday lives in peace and plenty. The farms were prosperous and well managed, livestock healthy and prolific, and children grew in both stature and character without any "authority" over them except that of their loving parents and cooperation from the community.

Fall came with the usual increased pace of harvest, canning and drying, hunting and slaughtering, moving the livestock down from the mountains, and all the other normal preparations for the coming winter. A late September morning also brought the start of labor contractions to Betty, and she was taken to the birthing center by a very worried husband.

The last month had been very hard on her, with swelling in her legs and feet the most troubling, but not the most serious. Her blood pressure had been much too high a few times, and the midwife had been grateful for the help of the herbalist and the old doctor as well. They were anxious to get her delivered, both for her sake and that of the infant.

Everyone in town was aware of the unfolding drama, and many prayers were offered for a safe and happy outcome. Many lingered as long as they could in front of the clinic building, grateful for the occasional progress reports from one of the young medics in training. Maria sat with her, taking turns with Roger holding her hands and moping her brow as the hours wore on.

A vigil was kept through the night. So many people who's lives had been touched directly by Betty's love and hard work stayed to watch, and many silent prayers were offered for the well being of both mother and child.

Then, just as the light began to creep over the eastern hills, a sleepy young man came out to let them know that the Bradshaws had a beautiful, strong son and Betty was doing well. The vigil became a joyful flutter as they scattered to spread the news all over town.

Mutt drew a cup of "the brew" from a pot on the stove and asked Jeff, "Did you hear what they're going to call him?" Jeff nodded and said, "William Robert, I think. That's both of their father's names and a good tradition."
*******

Thus ends the story - my story, but not the dream - my dream of a free society. I think there will be many different dreams and plans carried out, and no one of them will suit everyone. Just as there are many hundreds of different personalities and philosophies, there will have to be many different societies to provide the community they need. And there will always be a few who prefer the lonesome life of hermits, as well as misfits who only wish to prey on others. Utopia is not an option.

And remember, every choice and action has consequences.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2010, 04:19:57 pm by MamaLiberty »
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Docliberty

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Re: MamaLiberty's new story
« Reply #142 on: July 07, 2010, 04:02:37 pm »

Good story Mama!  And a good vision.
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Doc

"I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on.  I don't do these things to other people and I require the same from them."  Marion Morrison

"I do not fear my government.  I fear what my government will cause me to become."   Docliberty

"Every normal man must be tempted at times to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin to slit throats." H. L. Mencken

MamaLiberty

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Re: MamaLiberty's new story
« Reply #143 on: July 07, 2010, 04:21:06 pm »

Good story Mama!  And a good vision.

Thanks! I almost feel as if I've given birth. Now to go through it and edit. I think I have a publisher. :)
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Docliberty

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Re: MamaLiberty's new story
« Reply #144 on: July 07, 2010, 04:33:09 pm »

Good story Mama!  And a good vision.

Thanks! I almost feel as if I've given birth. Now to go through it and edit. I think I have a publisher. :)

I know the feeling.  I felt that way after I finished my book in November.  Now I have to update it to account for all of the Medicare changes.  :huh:
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Doc

"I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on.  I don't do these things to other people and I require the same from them."  Marion Morrison

"I do not fear my government.  I fear what my government will cause me to become."   Docliberty

"Every normal man must be tempted at times to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin to slit throats." H. L. Mencken

Tahn L.

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Re: MamaLiberty's new story
« Reply #145 on: July 07, 2010, 05:27:27 pm »

A fine story and well told, holding the promise of hope for us all and mankind. Thanks MamaLiberty!
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The one you feed!
  Native American Story

Government is a meme, woven within a supporting memeplex.

Who ever frames the argument, kicks ass.

From MamaLiberty; "The Price of Liberty (is) self ownership, self control, integrity and non-aggression."

"The lust to control the lives and property of others is the root of all evil". MamaLiberty

coloradohermit

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Re: MamaLiberty's new story
« Reply #146 on: July 08, 2010, 07:29:14 am »

I sure hate to see the saga end! It has been a great story left on a positive and hopeful note for the future.
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MamaLiberty

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Re: MamaLiberty's new story
« Reply #147 on: July 08, 2010, 08:06:52 am »

I plan to edit and revise it where necessary, then see if I can get it published.

But don't worry... the ghost has already indicated that a new story is brewing.  This community will be revisited five or ten years into the future.  We've often said that setting up such a community would be difficult at best, but that the real test of it would be how it endured, changed, adjusted to new conditions. It will be interesting to see what happens. At this point, I have NO idea. :)

So, stay tuned. I think I'll start a new thread with the next one, however.
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coloradohermit

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Re: MamaLiberty's new story
« Reply #148 on: July 08, 2010, 12:38:41 pm »

But don't worry... the ghost has already indicated that a new story is brewing. 
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MamaLiberty

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Re: MamaLiberty's new story
« Reply #149 on: July 18, 2010, 10:52:45 am »

Not quite done with the first chapter, but I'm working on it. Trying to divide the time between editing the last story, writing the new and all the other stuff I fill my life with. Had to take a whole day out to write a comprehensive range safety plan for a shooting event next week. Was asked to be the Chief RSO at the last minute!

I need this danged ghost to become a fully functional clone! Then we could get somewhere. LOL

Just thought I'd let you know that I've not forgotten all of you. :)
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