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Author Topic: Carpentry Tools  (Read 15561 times)

rasmith442

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Re: Carpentry Tools
« Reply #30 on: April 27, 2011, 11:09:26 pm »

Quote
Some sources of potential help (that I consider to be excellent resources)

Thank you for the listing, Clip. I have skimmed a few of these already from the library--now need to pick one or two and simply get my hands dirty. At the risk of hijacking the thread, I don't suppose you (or anyone) have similar list regarding simple, small, off-grid solar power systems? There's a wealth of info on the web, but it gets pretty vague in places, and seems to assume a level of knowledge I don't have, in other places. I need a format like this:
1. Do this. Do it this way. (Insert picture)
2. Now do this. Do it this way. (Insert picture)

and so on. Solar Power for Much Dumber than Average Dummies, I guess. 
« Last Edit: April 27, 2011, 11:14:03 pm by rasmith442 »
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da gooch

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Re: Carpentry Tools
« Reply #31 on: April 28, 2011, 12:58:13 am »

Quote
Some sources of potential help (that I consider to be excellent resources)

Thank you for the listing, Clip. I have skimmed a few of these already from the library--now need to pick one or two and simply get my hands dirty. At the risk of hijacking the thread, I don't suppose you (or anyone) have similar list regarding simple, small, off-grid solar power systems? There's a wealth of info on the web, but it gets pretty vague in places, and seems to assume a level of knowledge I don't have, in other places. I need a format like this:
1. Do this. Do it this way. (Insert picture)
2. Now do this. Do it this way. (Insert picture)

and so on. Solar Power for Much Dumber than Average Dummies, I guess. 

Do a search here for "Solar Power" rasmith442.

There are several folks here that design, make and even explain such things.

Alas I am not one of them.
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"Come and Take It"  Gonzales, Texas 1835

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Shanks Mare

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Re: Carpentry Tools
« Reply #32 on: April 30, 2011, 09:35:39 pm »

Guys, sorry for the late reply, I apologize for that. As so many know, I work a couple of different jobs, each day, so sometimes I'm not around for a while..

Thanks for the kind words, I've been buying tools since I was a kid, and have a fairly good selection. Guess I've been blessed by the Lord in many ways.

Clip, can you enlighten us, why can't you use your tools??? I surely hope it isn't a health issue.

Gooch-yea, for me its a necessity, I can't afford to pay anyone else to do it for me, so I do it myself. Since I have such a large family, "money" is usually why things don't get done....its a bugger at times, but I save till I "can". The purchase of the saw has waited a couple of "score", and I just keep getting older!

Rasmith-No worries, Hi-Jack any thread you want, none of us has any idea where things will "go", and we all get a chance to learn on the way!  
« Last Edit: April 30, 2011, 09:45:22 pm by Shanks Mare »
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gaurdduck

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Re: Carpentry Tools
« Reply #33 on: July 17, 2011, 02:07:49 pm »

my total wood shop tool inventory is:
1 electric circular saw
1 dovetail saw
1 keyhole saw
1 Western rip saw
1 trimming saw
1 japanese 2-sided saw
2 hatchets
1 1" auger
1 brace (ye olden drill)
1 set of drill bits from 1/16 - 1/2 inch
1 electric drill that is nearing it's end of use
1 1" chisel
1 1" corner chisel
1 homemade mallet
several pocket knives
a set of carving chisels
an assortment of rasps and files

I plan to add:
homemade planes
homemade molding planes
a bow lathe
a shavehorse
a homemade drawknife
another (larger) brace
homemade log dogs
a carpenter's hatchet
a felling axe
a broad axe
an assortment of homemade chisels
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knobster

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Re: Carpentry Tools
« Reply #34 on: July 18, 2011, 05:34:30 am »

my total wood shop tool inventory is:
<snip>
homemade log dogs
<snip>

log dogs?  Please elaborate...
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da gooch

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Re: Carpentry Tools
« Reply #35 on: July 18, 2011, 09:42:38 pm »

 Heavy [ shaped bars made to lock one log to another log like a clamp to stop it from rolling or sliding.

I don't have a photo to share but imagine a bar 1/2" to 1" in diameter 24" long with the ends sharpened down to points and bent towards each other like a Giant staple. The tips are usually bent past the 90* mark so that they are pointed back at each other kinda.

One point is driven into the stable log and the other into the log one is trying to "hold still".


I hope that helps without any images to show ....
« Last Edit: July 18, 2011, 09:49:12 pm by gooch »
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"Come and Take It"  Gonzales, Texas 1835

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gaurdduck

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Re: Carpentry Tools
« Reply #36 on: July 18, 2011, 10:04:28 pm »

They're gigantic staples. You can make them out of some rebar...

===

I just remembered I need some gouges too... lol.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2011, 10:35:23 pm by Pirate King Luffy »
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gaurdduck

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Re: Carpentry Tools
« Reply #37 on: July 19, 2011, 11:27:38 am »

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Wild Bill

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Re: Carpentry Tools
« Reply #38 on: December 12, 2011, 07:01:32 pm »

Howdy y'all.

First post here... hope I don't screw it up or come across too much like a knowitall...

I practice carpentry.  Rough and finish.  I also make furniture in the Arts & Crafts style (mostly because it is simple, sturdy, made of good materials and the emphasis is not on style, but on the joinery).  I own no power tools.  Two years ago I spent a few weeks studying under a Master, and he taught me more about joinery and finishing than I could ever learn on my own.  He told me "Once tools became electrified, craftsmanship largely went out the window".  I have found that he was right.

All my tools are hand tools.  Antiques, modern copies of antiques or ones I made myself.  I started buying old tools 10 years ago when I got out of the Army, and never really stopped.  It gets in your blood.  It began as a love of old tools, then branched into "I wonder how you use this?" then went to "How did they make this and why?", then morphed into "Well, if the old timers could make this, so can I.".

It does my heart good to see that y'all are interested in the Old Way of doing things.  We tend to forget that for the most part of human history, everything was done by hand, and by and large, to a much higher standard than what is produced today.  Doing things by hand (what I call Paleo-Carpentry) without electricity is hard, slow work most of the time as you all know, but I find it is much more rewarding and relaxing. 

Hopefully tomorrow I can post a list of the reference books I have that got me started and gave me a solid foundation for woodworking.  Also, some of the books I have found to be indespensible (sp?) when it comes to putting wooden things together.  And, of course, the required Tool Porn :) 

I don't know everything about woodworking.  Nobody can.  It's a learning path that we all walk and IMHO, there are no "Masters"... only serious advanced students on the path. 

See y'all tomorrow!
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da gooch

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Re: Carpentry Tools
« Reply #39 on: December 12, 2011, 09:16:14 pm »

Welcome Aboard Wild Bill.

Tool Porn ? :drool:

I'll be back for sure.
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"Come and Take It"  Gonzales, Texas 1835

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viper

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Re: Carpentry Tools
« Reply #40 on: December 31, 2011, 09:22:24 am »

Some great posts in here. I'll add my two cents as well, with a lean towards "what happens when there is no power?"

I'm not a carpenter by trade, but I'm the 4th generation in my family who's been working with wood since I was born. With the passing of my dad, I got passed down all the tools from my father, grandfather, and even great-grandfather.  Thus, I have enough power tools, circular saws, drill presses, and table saws to outfit a large construction crew! Those are GREAT right now, when everything is OK, but what do you do in a SHTF situation? My thoughts on the matter are this:

1) Most circular saws and drills that are corded require lots of amperage, especially when you're working them hard. Assuming you have power generation (solar, wind) then you can make SOME power, but what do you do when you're out of fresh, soft 2x4 lumber from Lowes? I challenge you to try to run a 1.5 inch deep cut down the trunk of a freshly-cut piece of timber and see the difference in how your saw performs. If worse comes to worse, that's what I see me having to do. So I mostly ignore my power tools and focus on what hand tools I have that will make life easier. Here's some things my folks taught me growing up:

Hammers: I have two hammers that I use regularly. One is a very thin tack hammer for working small spaces where a regular hammer won't work. I rarely use it, but it's great to have around when I DO need it.
My main hammer is one my dad taught me to make. He bought my first hammer for me when I was 12 years old, a 13 oz hammer with the small finishing head on it. I wanted bigger, but he said no. Then he came home and threw my brand new hammer in the fire barrel! I had no idea what in the world he was doing and pretty much figured he'd gone off his rocker.

After the handle burned out of it, he showed me how to replace the hammer handle of that small trim hammer with an 18 inch ax handle, shaved down to fit the head, then taught me how to wedge a head. Years later I thank him for it every time I swing it. I watch these framing guys with their 24 ounce waffle-head hammers wearing away half a day, then falling over with exhaustion. I don't have that problem.

The smaller flat finish head is great for ANY kind of work because it will FORCE you to learn how to swing a hammer correctly or you'll miss the nail entirely.

The 18 inch handle on it means I have a longer reach than the next guy and that extra 6 inches of handle adds a TREMENDOUS amount of leverage at the head. If I want small detail work, I hold the handle a little higher. When I need to drill deck boards all day, I hold it further down.

Having said that, fiber glass hammers are wonderful. They'll likely last longer than a hickory-handled hammer, but when they DO break, they're very difficult to re-handle. I'm on about the 4th handle in my hammer in 25 years and when it breaks I'll go out and seat another handle in it and I'll know how to do it properly.  So.. that's my thinking on that subject. Some may disagree and I'm not a master-carpenter, but it's something that taught me how to swing a hammer properly and having the skills to reseat the head on a new haft would be important down the road when you can't go to home depot and get another fiberglass one.

Screwdrivers and Chisels:
I always try to buy quality tools, but the most important thing I can think of in the worst case situation is multi-functionality and strength of my tools.. how long they'll last me under REALLY heavy use conditions. I'd suggest making sure your chisels and screwdrivers are full-tang. I'd probably consider that to be the most important factor, next to blade quality. There WILL come a time when you need to beat on a flat head screwdriver to loosen a rusty screw, or need to wedge something with it, or need to notch oak with your chisels.. and having a full steel tang means they are designed to hold up to a hammer blow.

Breast Braces (Drills)
I decided one day to do something the "old fashioned" way using none of my power tools and only my great-grandfather's tools. We all know hand-saws are a pain but they're fairly simple to operate. Push forward, pull backward, keep it straight, repeat. When it came time to break out the stanley breast drill I was all excited. I have an 1897 brace and bit set and so I set to work drilling out a 4x4 chunk of salt-treated pine. I leaned into it and drilled... and drillled.. and drilled... and took a break... and drilled.. and drilled.. see my point? These things are GREAT when you have nothing else to do, but they will work you to DEATH! So.. if you have a set of them, use them regularly and get familiar with them. You really don't have any idea how much your every day power drill saves you work until you try to do the same job without one. Man.. that sucks! Be aware that most old breast drills dont' take a standard drill bit either. They have an old fashioned square chuck usually, so if you have a brace, be sure to pick up some bits made for it. Those will be harder to find than the brace itself.

Saws: Having hand saws is great, but you'll wear through the blade teeth fast if you're using them every day. Our grandparents simply sat down with a saw file and sharpened them right on the spot. Sadly this is a lost art I've been meaning to teach myself but can't find a tutor for. So, have plenty of hand-saws for when they start to wear down or know how to sharpen them yourself. (and let me know if you figure out how to do it properly!)

Measuring:
There is NOTHING I use in my shop more than my speed square and tape measure, however tape measures run on cheap springs these days and after awhile they tend to fail to retract which is usually when you accidentally break one. I'd suggest having a folding 6-foot rule as well. I've carried one all my life and never go anywhere with out it. They're only two or three dollars and you can get a couple of them for redundancy. Coupled with a speed square, a folding rule makes great long angles when you need something longer than the speed square. Just a tip.

Ok.. that's my two cents. Hope you all have a great day and I hope we never need any of this stuff!
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da gooch

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Re: Carpentry Tools
« Reply #41 on: January 01, 2012, 11:33:14 am »


[snip - snip]

Saws: Having hand saws is great, but you'll wear through the blade teeth fast if you're using them every day. Our grandparents simply sat down with a saw file and sharpened them right on the spot. Sadly this is a lost art I've been meaning to teach myself but can't find a tutor for. So, have plenty of hand-saws for when they start to wear down or know how to sharpen them yourself. (and let me know if you figure out how to do it properly!)

[snip - snip]


There is a trick to it viper and a special tool as well.

Not only are each of the teeth sharpened [theoretically] to the same angle but each tooth is then "set" to the same angle away from the plane of the saw blade face.
This bit of offset is what clears the wood away from the sides of the saw blade and allows it to pass through the wood without binding. IE: it cuts a slot wider than the saw blade itself.
BUT you already knew that I'd bet.

Hold your saw up and sight down the face of the blade from the back to the cutting edge.
See how each tooth is "angled" away from the plane of the blade face?
That is the "set" of the saw tooth.
Notice also that each tooth is set opposite to its neighbors.
[ a bit of old lore: a properly set saw will let a needle slide from handle to tip without falling off of the saw.]

The tool that does this bit of magic is called a saw set. [go figure  :rolleyes: ]
It looks like a pair of weird almost pistol shaped pliers and I will bet that your great grand father had one in his kit.
The file that sharpens the saw is a 'knife file" [the blade of the file is shaped, in cross-section, just like a knife blade] and most folks would pass the file from the rear toward the front of the saw tooth. [from the handle towards the tip of the saw]

I used to sharpen my own cross cut saw blades and I would sharpen the teeth first and then set them and be ready for another two or three weeks of saw use. [or days if in very heavy usage]
My saw set had  an adjustable angle setting so that I could set the teeth on a large cross cut saw or the teeth on a small hand saw either rip or cross cut. [using the last few teeth on the hind most part of the blade as a guide for "original" angle]

Mine disappeared when my house was burgled [with the rest of the tool box it used to live in] and the one I have now is pretty plain jane but functional.

 BTW ... Welcome Aboard
« Last Edit: January 01, 2012, 11:35:45 am by gooch »
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"Come and Take It"  Gonzales, Texas 1835

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viper

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Re: Carpentry Tools
« Reply #42 on: January 01, 2012, 09:48:24 pm »

Gooch,
Yeah I remember my grandfather taking my grandmother's sewing needle from her box. He'd lay the saw on the top of his stretched out leg, angled downward, and he knew everything was filed clean when it would slide all the way down and out smoothly. I can get the tools, but the "skill" is another thing altogether!
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