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Author Topic: Id Cards and Driver's License Specs and Desires  (Read 2293 times)

JustaCaveman

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Id Cards and Driver's License Specs and Desires
« on: January 22, 2005, 03:57:20 pm »

Good for moles:

"Fraudulent Document Recognition (FDR) Instructor Preparation
For decades, motor vehicle administrators have sought to minimize the incidence of fraudulent
documents, an issue intensified with recent technology that gives individuals committing fraud more
resources for counterfeiting or altering documents. To aid in the fight against fraud, AAMVA has
developed a standardized training program. The Fraudulent Document Recognition (FDR) training
provides both motor vehicle and law enforcement personnel the tools for identifying fraudulent
documents.
This five-day course will focus on the communication, presentation and training skills required to teach
the FDR curriculum. The program is based on a comprehensive curriculum designed to build skill,
competence and confidence in a training environment. Participants will gain hands-on experience in
using the training tools, conducting training activities, and practicing facilitation skills.
What You’ll Learn
• Levels I and II of the FDR curriculum.
• The importance of research and organization in preparing to present the FDR course.
• The effective use of voice, action, image, and other delivery skills.
• How to respond in a focused and controlled fashion during question and answer periods.
How You’ll Benefit
• Obtain thorough knowledge of the curriculum to facilitate comprehensive preparation and
effective presentation skills.
• Gain the ability to network with other instructors.
Who Should Attend?
• Trainers with at least two years experience."

More good mole prospective seminars:

Law Enforcement Training Available from AAMVA
Training Vehicle Document Examiners Certification (VDEC)
The Vehicle Document Examiner’s Certification (VDEC) program is a professional, comprehensive, and
instructionally sound training program. The goal of the two-day Vehicle Document Examiners
Certification training is to adequately train motor vehicle personnel to examine and evaluate vehicle
documents, and to recognize fraudulent documents presented to them in the course of their regular duties.
When fraud is suspected or detected, the training also provides the necessary steps to take the appropriate
actions
Program Format
The modular curriculum allows jurisdictions to customize course content for each learner group in order
to maximize learning and subsequent task performance.
Target Audience
The training program is appropriate for Law enforcement, including the North American Title & Fraud
Enforcement Association

Even More:

Latest News
Optical Variable Device (OVD) Selected
Following the tragedy of September 11, 2001, the AAMVA law enforcement community along with
numerous other groups called for a standardized security device for all drivers license / state issued
identification cards that would be more easily recognizable and trusted by law enforcement throughout
the United States and Canada. The AAMVA Board of Directors also recognized the need to strengthen
the entire drivers’ licenses issuance process and formed a working group to determine the best type of
device as well as formulate the standards and design. AAMVA has approved the design for the Optical
Variable Device (OVD) for use as the common security device on Driver's License/Identification (DL/ID)
cards
The device was created and designed to deter counterfeiting and simulation of the cards. The OVD image
that has been selected can be easily learned for quick recognition and authentication. The image will
serve for all North American AAMVA jurisdictions (currently the United States and Canada).
Production of the device will begin shortly and the device will begin to show up on new drivers’ licenses
and identification cards within the near future.

More:

Recent Action Taken by AAMVA to Enhance Law Enforcement Functions
In past issues of the Law Enforcement Committee Newsletter, we have publicized an extensive listing of
the local, state and federal agencies and associations that representatives of this Committee participate
with on an on-going basis.
The reputation of this participation continues to grow and promotes AAMVA’s willingness to work with
outside organizations to improve highway safety and prevent crime. Since our last newsletter in April we
have participated in additional working group efforts:
• National Notary Association – identity document verification
• National Association of Public Health Statistical Information Systems (NAPHSIS) – birth &
death record verification
• Transportation Research Board (TRB) – Decreasing the rate of highway fatalities
• IACP – Major City Chiefs Committee – national agenda to fight the problem of ID Theft / Fraud
• IACP – Vehicle Theft Committee – promotion of expansion of NMVTIS
• National Sheriffs Association – appointment to the Traffic Safety Committee
• IACP – Highway Safety Committee
• Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA)
• US Department of Justice – Working Group on ID Theft / Fraud
• American Association of State Highway Transportation Officials (AASHTO) - issues related to
suspended, revoked and unlicensed drivers
• National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS) – law enforcement working group
• Midwestern Odometer Title Fraud Enforcement Association (MOTFEA)
• FBI – in-service training on ID Theft / Fraud
• USSS / FTC / DOJ / US Postal – law enforcement in-service training on ID Theft / Fraud
• AAMVA Regional Conference education – joint efforts to fight auto theft

More Info

AAMVA Hosts Patriot Act Working Group
AAMVA solicited participation by the states to join a USA PATRIOT Act Working Group to assist the
membership with implementation of the Act. One of the most critical discussions has focused on the
January 31, 2005 implementation date contained in the Final Rule that ALL states must be participating in
a fingerprint-based background records check (BRC) process by this date.
TSA has produced minimum federal standards for the fingerprint collection requirement for the USA
PATRIOT Act. In addition, they are developing minimum federal standards for the:
• Criminal history adjudication,
• Appeals process, and
• Waiver process.
Among AAMVA’s deliverables will be:
• Updated CDLIS Specifications integrating the electronic transmission of the application data and
BRC response with the current CDLIS infrastructure,
• An updated CDLIS State Procedures Manual,
• A USA Patriot Act Implementation Guide, and
• Test plans necessary to validate State compliance with the Act.
States still have the option of collecting the fingerprints themselves, either within the MVA, through a
contractor or through agreements with law enforcement. In addition, TSA is providing the option for
States to use a TSA Agent to collect the fingerprints and application data on behalf of the State.
AAMVA has named Tracy Taillon as the Project Manager for this effort. You may reach her via email at
ttaillon@aamva.org or via phone at 703-908-5768.

More Info for "law enforcement officers" of which, I'm sure there are those out there and might be interesting to dig this one up:

Fraud Investigators Resource Guide
A list of investigators from a variety of agencies across the country that deal in all types of fraud
investigations including identity theft / fraud, odometer fraud, auto theft, counterfeit vital documents,
stolen documents including federal and state identity cards and equipment and materials used to make
these documents.
This guide is available only to law enforcement officers. Access is available through the LE website
http://www.aamva.org/committees/mnu_comLaw...Enforcement.asp. Access is by password only. To
acquire access and obtain a password, contact AAMVA’s Sr. Director for Law Enforcement. To obtain
a copy of the Resource Guide you must agree to add your name to the guide so that others might contact
you if they have a question regarding an ongoing investigation.
7

Their very own Yahoo group:

YAHOO e-group - LE Communications
The YAHOO e-group continues to grow in both participation and information disseminated. We hear
frequently from those who participate in this e-mail group how much they appreciate the information
provided. This communications platform is very active, often with multiple listings on a daily basis. For
this reason we make an effort to be very specific in the subject of the topic and if action is necessary. The
Yahoo Group provides monthly summaries of a variety of law enforcement and highway safety
publications that may prove valuable to others within your organization, e.g. ITI Transportation
Summary, and the IACP bi-weekly Capital Hill Report.
To sign up for the Yahoo e-group, visit the AAMVA website: http://groups.yahoo.com.

Misc:

Fraud Early Warning System (FEWS) to Improve LE Bulletins and Officer Safety
As a result of the success of the use of AAMVA’s Branch Theft Notices (see above), AAMVA is moving
to upgrade the system and improve its capabilities.
The new system will allow U.S. jurisdictions’ DMV and LE officials to report fraudulent driver licensing
and identification activities. The jurisdictions will provide the direct input to the system based on
lost/stolen and found/discovered items. The system will be accessible for both input and review under
strict controlled access conditions. It will provide an immediate (real time) function that will serve as an
alert and early warning system to jurisdictions that suspected fraud has occurred in their locations. It will
also serve as an ongoing archive and repository of information time periods to facilitate investigation and
reporting needs. There will be levels of information about fraud, categories containing specific
information such as descriptions of items, number ranges of products, physical characteristics and perhaps
visual images of fraudulent documents with comparisons to descriptions of, or actual, genuine documents.
In the future, the information archived will be organized to facilitate investigations and processes to aid
ongoing case development and information matching. It will do this by providing query tools, feedback
mechanisms, logical structures of data base material, and trend analysis and reporting. This information
will be useful for both the motor vehicle community and other government agencies as well as for
AAMVA to provide information to document arguments for continued and increased efforts to secure
North America from identification theft and fraud.

 
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JustaCaveman

  • Guest
Id Cards and Driver's License Specs and Desires
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2005, 04:13:29 pm »

Strategic Plan added to as the information flows:

Recent Action Taken by AAMVA to Enhance Law Enforcement Functions
In past issues of the Law Enforcement Committee Newsletter, we have publicized an extensive listing of
the local, state and federal agencies and associations that representatives of this Committee participate
with on an on-going basis.
The reputation of this participation continues to grow and promotes AAMVA’s willingness to work with
outside organizations to improve highway safety and prevent crime. Since our last newsletter in April we
have participated in additional working group efforts:
• National Notary Association – identity document verification
• National Association of Public Health Statistical Information Systems (NAPHSIS) – birth &
death record verification
• Transportation Research Board (TRB) – Decreasing the rate of highway fatalities
• IACP – Major City Chiefs Committee – national agenda to fight the problem of ID Theft / Fraud
• IACP – Vehicle Theft Committee – promotion of expansion of NMVTIS
• National Sheriffs Association – appointment to the Traffic Safety Committee
• IACP – Highway Safety Committee
• Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA)
• US Department of Justice – Working Group on ID Theft / Fraud
• American Association of State Highway Transportation Officials (AASHTO) - issues related to
suspended, revoked and unlicensed drivers
• National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS) – law enforcement working group
• Midwestern Odometer Title Fraud Enforcement Association (MOTFEA)
• FBI – in-service training on ID Theft / Fraud
• USSS / FTC / DOJ / US Postal – law enforcement in-service training on ID Theft / Fraud
• AAMVA Regional Conference education – joint efforts to fight auto theft

Powerpoint- Open Office presentation here:
http://www.aamva.org/Documents/Evt_Present...04%20Oct604.ppt

 
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JustaCaveman

  • Guest
Id Cards and Driver's License Specs and Desires
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2005, 04:32:21 pm »

Know what your are up against again by the AAMVA and Your Association of Stated Legislators and LE, here are some Definitions:

"GLOSSARY
Breeder documents – a document that motor vehicle agencies use to verify identity,
e.g. birth certificate, passport, Social Security card, INS documents. Any document that
can be used to enhance identity or obtain identification. Document used to start the
identification process, sometimes called foundation document
Driver License Agreement (DLA) The Driver License Compact (DLC) and Non-resident
Violator Compact (NRVC) are agreements between the jurisdictions to promote highway
safety by sharing and transmitting driver and conviction information.
AAMVA supports the concepts of the DLC and NRVC, and supports the Compact
Executive Board, an entity separate from the association. AAMVA supports its activities
by providing Secretariat services and having an AAMVA Board Advisor in attendance at
Compact Executive Board meetings.
Currently the DLC and the NRVC are being revised and combined into the new Driver
License Agreement (DLA).
Drivers License – also referred to as DL. The document issued by a state or Canadian
Province certifying an individual’s ability and right to driver a motor vehicle.
DMV – department of motor vehicles. Sometimes referred by different names such as
BMV (bureau of motor vehicles). It is the function used to issue the drivers license and
other motor vehicle related documents.
Identity Card – also referred to as an ID. A state or provincial issued document used to
verify identity. In most cases, the issuance process for this document is exactly the
same as the drivers license.
Law enforcement – the discipline and profession concerned with the customs,
practices, and rules of conduct of a community that are recognized as binding by the
community. Enforcement of the body of rules is through a controlling authority. For the
sake of this paper, law enforcement agencies include all sworn officers and agency
personnel serving large and small municipalities, sheriff departments and agencies,
investigative departments and agencies investigators, as well as state and federal
agencies and personnel."

"Access to Drivers License & Identification Card Data
By Law Enforcement"

Attachments
AAMVA Law Enforcement Resolution
A. Image Exchange 35
International Association of Chiefs of Police Resolutions
B. Bar Codes on Motor Vehicle Licenses 37
C. Guidelines for Improving Automated Criminal History Record Systems and 38
Effective Screening of Personnel
D. Support for Funding and Development of New Identification and 40
Communications Technology
E. Support for National Uniform Standards for Driver’s Licenses and 42
Identification Cards
F. Electronic Transfer of Information 44
G. Law Enforcement Access To Drivers License Digital Images 45

All info will be included with a link for further investigation, most in pdf format:
http://www.aamva.org/Documents/idsIDSecuri...dices278303.pdf

Highway Safety
  Keeping unsafe drivers from obtaining a license following suspension or
revocation
  Verifying the identity of an individual when stopped at roadside
Officer and Public Safety
  Notification at roadside
  Awareness in preparation for and during an ongoing investigation
Domestic Security
  Identification of individuals who pose a potential national security threat
Identity Theft
  Verification of an individual’s identity at time of application
  Verification of an individual during an investigation
  Verification of an individual at the time of a transaction
Privacy
While the exchange of this information can save lives, it is critical that AAMVA and its
members be concerned about the misuse or mis-appropriation of the information,
assuring privacy and protection of the data.

May I add here, yeah right.

From the same document:
"27-83-04
© 2003 AAMVA. All rights reserved
5
Further, considering the current capabilities of CDLIS & PDPS, it is sometimes difficult
for a driver-licensing agency to accurately determine if the subject of the CDLIS/PDPS
match is – or is not – the person applying for a license in their state. FMCSA
Workgroup #8 focusing on CDL Fraud Prevention Initiatives (Interstate Digital Image
Exchange) will provide the solution to the process. (Addendum #2)"

"...27-83-04
7
CURRENT PRACTICES
Law enforcement agencies, federal, state and local, use the driver license image on a
frequent basis to identify victims, criminal suspects, missing children and the elderly.
Digital images from driver records have significantly aided law enforcement agencies
charged with homeland security. The events of September 11, 2001 clearly
demonstrate the value of the driver record photograph. The 19 terrorists obtained driver
licenses from several states and federal authorities relied heavily on those images for
the identification of the individuals responsible for the horrific criminal acts on that fateful
day.
The mobility of criminal activity in American and Canadian societies means that law
enforcement agencies often experience situations requiring expedient identification of
criminal suspects, which are significantly aided by the availability of photographic
images. The availability of images varies between booking photographs, prison
photographs and activities and is primarily confined to the investigating jurisdiction. For
example, three days prior to September 11th, a Maryland State Trooper made a traffic
stop on one of the 19 identified World Trade Center terrorists. Because various
databases were neither linked nor accessible, the subject was not detained. Instead, he
was given a standard traffic citation, which was found in his vehicle glove compartment
along with several others immediately following the World Trade Center tragedy.
Typically, the digital images (signature and photograph) are reliable, of good quality and
in most cases provide the most recent image of a criminal suspect. The images
embedded in driver license records have proven to be a valuable resource for law
enforcement and today represents the one of the most valuable resources to
investigators.
A crime in one state involving a criminal suspect from another state requires
investigators to request images from jurisdictions outside the state where the
investigation is occurring. The immediate availability of identity photographs from driver
license jurisdictions outside local or state police jurisdictions are often difficult to obtain.
Today, the process for acquiring an image is a laborious process often involving days of
valuable time, writing of letters and making direct requests to administrators to acquire
an image. This represents valuable time in a criminal investigation and may contribute
to delayed apprehension of criminal suspects.
To further illustrate the present situation, recently a federal law enforcement agency in a
southern US state requested two photographs from DMV jurisdictions outside the state
where a surveillance operation was occurring and agents found the access time to far
exceed their immediate need. The case involved a parental kidnapping and active
surveillance had developed a suspect that required a driver history and photograph to
verify the identity. The agency requested the assistance of the local DMV jurisdiction in
the acquisition of the images and the two DMV jurisdictions were very responsive to the requests; however, were not able to transmit jpeg image files (the photographs were
obtained through fax capability)."

Same document:

"Law enforcement officers have daily contact with many people. Most are good citizens
in need of help or that have committed a minor mistake. However, dangerous criminals
travel the streets and highways of our nation in furtherance of their criminal activities. It
is crucial for law enforcement officer safety to know the identity of the person or person
with whom they are in contact.
Domestic security issues related to the safety and well being of the public are of
particular concern given the circumstances and threats evident in today’s society.
Access to cross-jurisdictional data, including digital photographs and records are
necessary to authenticate drive license and identification card use related to the
transportation industry. Unfortunately, these threats are serious and of a major concern
the public and public service agencies.
In general, the current national drivers license systems failure to address these issues
often results in the licensing of unsafe problem drivers, putting the rest of the public at
risk. Criminals easily commit identity theft and cause serious issues and inconvenience
for the innocent victim. The financial impact of identity theft and related fraud grows
daily and is of a major concern to the public."

Same document:

"27-83-04
© 2003 AAMVA. All rights reserved
11
Solutions – Benefits and Impact
There are many compelling public safety reasons to provide interoperability to the
access of drivers’ license data. Although many jurisdictions have enhanced issuance
practices, improved the security of the driver license card, and instituted anti-fraud
programs, it is still difficult to defend a system that allows the issuance of an authentic
driver license to imposters and failing to adequately share information about unsafe
drivers because of the lack of expedient inter-jurisdictional data access. Additionally,
law enforcement depends on the images and records to expedite the identification of
criminal suspects, make accurate decisions at roadside, insure a higher degree of officer
safety and protect the public by removing fugitive and other criminals from society.
The following sections illustrate the need for inter-operability between jurisdictions:
Highway Safety
Problem drivers spread their convictions around because state-licensing jurisdictions
cannot access real-time driver records from other states. Teenagers easily obtain
counterfeit licenses or alter licenses, purchase alcohol, and drive on the highways in all
jurisdictions. Criminals use illegally obtained licenses to create aliases and steal
people’s identity. And, as the whole world observed on September 11th, terrorists have
obtained licenses legally, allowing them to blend into society and enjoy the privileges
afforded to the country’s citizens.
The ability of jurisdictions to share information on all drivers with one another by
consistently collecting and sharing driver information is essential to the integrity of the
driver license process and is the principal method of enforcing the one driver, one record
goal of all jurisdictions. With interoperability within and between jurisdictions, this
information should then be available to appropriate law enforcement officials in real time
to identify, monitor and sanction problem drivers. This component is the essential
ingredient to an effective highway safety effort.
Although most driver’s license holders believe that a law enforcement official in one state
can quickly and accurately verify driving history information on a driver from another
state, the reality is much different. Although systems do exist, it can take several
minutes to access driver record information in another jurisdiction. The result is a
practical inability to verify license information in real time. It is possible, then, that an
individual stopped for a traffic offense could produce a counterfeit license, in the name of
an individual who does not even exist, or provide a name of a person holding a valid
license and escape detection of fraud. This is a significant public safety issue, since
according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) individuals
with invalid driver’s licenses caused approximately 11% of fatal accidents in 2000. The
cost in human life, injuries, and increased insurance premiums is enormous. Based on
available NHTSA data, it is estimated that the economic cost of these crashes alone was
over $6 billion.
A significant opportunity exists for jurisdictions to drastically increase public safety and
reduce the associated costs of unsafe drivers. Collaboration between jurisdictions is
essential to provide driver license administrators and law enforcement with the
necessary tools to effectively identify and consistently apply sanctions that will reduce
the impact of problem drivers and reduce death, injury and property damage on the
nation’s highways.
Officer and Public Safety
Strengthening the integrity and security of state-issued driver licenses and ID cards is
needed to improve highway safety, reduce identity theft, and protect homeland security.
With over 240 valid forms of driver licenses and state-issued identification cards
distributed throughout the 68 AAMVA member jurisdictions and differing practices
among jurisdictions for issuing them, it is easy to fraudulently obtain licenses.
Counterfeit breeder documents (birth certificates, social security cards and INS
documents, etc.) are easily acquired in what is described as an “open air market” in most
jurisdictions. Counterfeit licenses, altered licenses and fraudulently issued licenses are
easily acquired and fraud is difficult to detect without inter-operability between issuing
jurisdictions.
Currently, a crime in one jurisdiction involving a criminal suspect from another
jurisdiction (pick any two jurisdictions) often leaves a law enforcement officer without
adequate resources to make timely and informed decisions regarding identity and
requires investigators in criminal cases to request images through a manual inquiry
process from jurisdictions outside the state where the investigation is underway. This is
time consuming at best and potentially life threatening at worst. Today, the process for
acquiring an image is a laborious process often involving days of valuable time, writing
of letters and making direct appeals to administrators to acquire an image. This
represents a waste of time at roadside and in a criminal investigation.
The law enforcement community believes that the availability of images across
jurisdictional lines would be a tremendous service to the law enforcement community
and would aid significantly in the investigative process.
Domestic Security
According to the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), the use of fraudulent
documents by foreign nationals is extensive. Numerous fraudulent documents have
been intercepted at ports of entry and involve border-crossing cards, alien registration
cards, nonimmigrant visas, passports and citizenship documents. The counterfeit
employment eligibility documents such as the social security card are reported to be
widely available. Foreign nationals predominantly use those same documents as the
foundation documents to obtain a driver license or identification card.1"

Same document but with a bit of a National ID flare:

"There is a need for interoperability of driver license records to obtain digital images from
the jurisdiction that issued a driver license, permit, or an ID card. For example, the
Transportation Security Administration (TSA) now requires that jurisdictions be in a
position to transfer the records of CDL hazardous materials between DMVs to verify
identity when a driver changes jurisdictions.
The sharing of operational information between police and law enforcement agencies in
countering inter-jurisdictional crime such as organized crime, drug trafficking and
terrorism has always been a priority. The tragic events of September 11th have reminded
law enforcement community of how critical timely and efficient information sharing is for
dealing with crime and social disorder. Police are most effective when a collective
approach is taken in dealing with problems of this nature. Sharing of information has
gone from a periodic and isolated practice to normal way of doing business for many
effective police organizations.
Identity Theft
Identity theft is a serious crime. People whose identities have been stolen can spend
months or years – and thousands of dollars – cleaning up the mess the thieves have
made of their good name and credit record. In the meantime, victims may lose job
opportunities, be refused loans for education, housing, cars, or even be arrested for
crimes they didn’t commit. Humiliation, anger and frustration are common feelings
victims experience as they navigate the arduous process of reclaiming their identity.
Identity theft is recognized as one of the fastest growing crimes in America. The costs
associated with identity theft are enormous, with estimates reaching over $2.5 billion and
projected to grow by 30 percent per year reaching $8 billion by the year 2005. The
average loss to the financial industry is approximately $17,000 per compromised
identity.2
The public therefore expects that they be protected from identity theft that arises when
someone intent on committing fraud compromises the driver license issuance process.
The inter-operability of driver license data between jurisdictions and law enforcement
access to the same data on a real-time basis is a front line of defense to the prevention
and detection of criminals who engage in this criminal activity.
Driver License Agreement
Real time access to intra and interstate data files, which would include an image, would
enhance highway safety and further promote the objective and guiding principles of the
Driver License Agreement (DLA). The DLA is a reciprocal program of cooperation
between the jurisdictions to promote highway safety and to provide for the fair and
impartial treatment of drivers operating within their respective borders."

Nice additions to the National Security debates below, clever indeed:

The ability to identify a person and exchange and verify data is a basic requirement for
the DLA to be successful. It also serves to promote our national security interest. The
DLA creates a driver control record, a list of convictions and administrative actions to be
shared amongst jurisdictions, outlines how that information is to be shared, creates
uniform reporting requirements, and provides for compliance criteria. That data provides
Licensing Administrators with important information to validate that an applicant (or
current license holder) is not already licensed elsewhere, thus helping to ensure the one
driver- one control record objective of the DLA.
This information also helps to identify drivers attempting to apply for a license under a
false identity in hopes of avoiding the impacts of a suspension or revocation resulting
from traffic convictions. This process would also help to validate that the person is who
he/she says they are.
Traffic stops can serve as an investigative tool in validating the overall licensing
process. The first step in this process begins with the ability for an individual to establish
proper identification, then verification of unlawful operation. If law enforcement
personnel had the ability to validate the authenticity of a license at the roadside, a major
national security interest would be served.
In the majority of traffic stops only license record data (no photo) will be needed to assist
the officer in verifying the identity of the driver. If no license is produced, a name/address
search on a one-to-one or one-to-many file system would likely result in the true identity
being determined, thus providing an opportunity to check the current driving privilege
status. In those few occasions where this failed, comparisons with an image could then
be considered. With the many additional responsibilities of our law enforcement
following the tragic events of September 11, other benefits may occur as determined by
a jurisdictional law or federal regulations.
The combination of DLA, and the ability to access and share data files real-time would
result in synergistic energy for the promotion of highway safety, customer service and
national security."

Pros and Cons, I'll skip the financing portion as you can imagine the billions wasted yourself except for a brief amount of information.  The rest is in the pdf.

SOLUTIONS - Pro’s & Con’s
DL Administrator
Pros
  Integrity of the driver control record - data is already available but images are not
  Completeness of data files
  Identification of problem driver
  Prevention of obtaining multiple records
  Prevention of fraud (ID)
  Validation of entire DL issuing process including verification
LE
Pros
  Officer security
  Identification of problem driver
  Validation of driver control record
  Identification authenticity
  Fraud prevention
  Adherence to federal requirement for homeland security
  Efficient use of enforcement resources (saving time and $$ too)
  Real time access to digital image and data file (driver record)
Citizen
Pros
  ID fraud reduced
  Information doesn’t get on the wrong record
  Help to assure that a citizen is not wrongfully charged / arrested
Cons
Accountability
  Privacy abuse
  Rules violations (requires audit track)
  Security
New Maintenance Issues
  System upkeep
  System errors
  Systems downtimes
Costs
  Hardware / software requirement
  Additional time per request (law enforcement wait time)
LE logistics
  Remembering image when he re-approaches vehicle after download
Training
  Expense
  Time

27-83-04
16
In estimating costs, consider the following:
  Costs to establish a system for the storage of retrieval of digital image
  Storage & maintenance costs of digital image
  The costs of transmission of digital image (network (<land lines/mobile/other>)
  Software & hardware required to share digital image/data
  The ability to request a digital image
  The ability to receive a digital image remotely (roadside)
  The ability to track requests for digital images (audit)
  The capability to secure digital image during transmission and storage
  The ability to authenticate users of digital image
Costs may be reduced by our ability to piggyback on existing technology systems, (i.e.
CDLIS).

Ohhh, they want to make sure it's private, EXCEPT for Law Enforcement and Choicepoint:

"27-83-04
© 2003 AAMVA. All rights reserved
1. Openness
  Using guiding principals put in place by the Association, photos and data may
be made available to law enforcement personnel when requested.
5. Use Limitations
  Personal data is needed for the integrity of the documents that we issue as ID
documents
  Prevention of identity theft
  Explanation of driver control activities
  Advise the public that their information may be made available to law
enforcement.
  Data and photos will only be used to verify identity
  Law enforcement has access only when needed
6. Disclosure Limitation
  In accordance with the DPPA and guidelines put in place for the transfer of
data and photos, appropriate procedures will be used to audit the distribution
of data.
7. Data Security
  Managing information securely isn't just a matter of having expensive
technology. Good security practices encompass a range of issues from
physical security to employee hiring to data handling protocols as basic as
making sure counters or desks are clear of applications before employees
leave on breaks. Good security practices need to become a routine and
integral part of your organization's culture. How to make that happen?
Security becomes a priority when it starts at the top. Employees need regular
training, not just during their initial orientation.
  Constraints for access
8. Accountability
  Reference to criminal penalties in DPPA
  Create internal controls
  Assure an audit process will be established to protect against abuse of both
the request and use of this information"

Information Exchange Among States- 2003:

20
Comments From The Jurisdictions On The AAMVA Policy
Relating to Data Exchange
ALBERTA
Alberta does permit access to the image database to
law enforcement agencies in the province that have
entered into a contractual agreement. Access by law
enforcement agencies out the province is not being
considered.
ALABAMA
Alabama already provides driver license images to
law enforcement agencies upon request through the
Alabama Bureau of Investigation, a Division of the
Alabama Department of Public Safety. We will not
change this policy due to the fact that it provides us
with a paper trail of the incoming request and the
outgoing response.
ARIZONA
Strict control of misuse of the images would be very
difficult if we are giving photo images to law
enforcement agencies throughout the U.S. The states
should all adopt similar procedures for requesting
photos and determine the legitimate reasons for a law
enforcement request for a photo. Arizona MVD’s
Competitive Government Partnerships is already
working on providing photo images via the state
portal to local law enforcement agencies that cannot
access photos through ACJIS. Allowing photo
retrieval to other states should not be a problem.
However, there may be some additional
hardware/software requirements for ITG.
*Propose a policy that would require the motor
vehicle agencies to process queries against law
enforcement wanted and threat databases.
Image Exchange is a definite plus. Arizona is well
down this road, but needs to revise our internal
policies by allowing law enforcement officers to
obtain digital images from local MVD field offices if
they do not have online access. This concept needs to
be applied to the exchange of digital images between
states. There should be connectivity between all
states that allow the CSR to view an image,
regardless of where the credential originates. From
experience, we know the fiscal impact goes far
beyond what it costs law enforcement to tap into our
database.
CALIFORNIA
California supports the proposed policy.
Currently, the department provides photo images
electronically to California law enforcement agencies
under very strict guidelines. This proposal, if
implemented, would create an increase in the number
of photos currently being requested by law
enforcement agencies. California agrees with not
allowing the system for photo line-ups, leaving the
system available for verifying identity in a time
critical mode. California also restricts photos from
being stored and does not allow the creation of a
database of photos based on retrievals.
California’s system works in conjunction with the
California Law Enforcement Telecommunications
System (CLETS). Access by other states is being
developed and coordinated through the California
Department of Justice (DOJ). Photos are not yet
available nationally from California’s photo files.
There is a list of success stories from law
enforcement agencies that have been able to identify
and apprehend criminals because of the speed with
which they could obtain photos.
Law enforcement participation is governed by
policies and procedures of the CLETS system, and by
contractual agreements between DMV and the DOJ,
and local law enforcement agencies, detailing
required security requirements. Sanctions are
available in the event of misuse or illegal access.
CalPhoto is in its first full year of implementation;
therefore good estimates of use are not yet available.
If there were an increase in photo retrievals beyond
system capacity, additional costs for servers to
manage the traffic would occur. California’s
development costs included programming to develop
the application and servers to manage the inquiry
traffic. A portion of the development and hardware
were federally funded. A reduction in manual photo
retrievals is expected as more agencies participate,
resulting in a staff reduction.
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COLORADO
Currently, we provide access to photographs,
signatures, and fingerprints upon request by law
enforcement. At one point last year, MV sought
information regarding the cost to provide web access
to law enforcement, and found the cost to be
prohibitive.
Additionally, our current mainframe computer
system would not be capable of handling the
transactions. The Motor Vehicle Enforcement
Section will handle any requests for this information
promptly. Colorado law specifically prohibits access
to photo, print and SSN information to anyone other
than the person of interest and criminal justice
agencies. Strict record keeping is necessary related to
provision of this information and we require that
requests be in writing via e-mail or teletype, so that
our records are complete.
We have the ability to e-mail or directly fax a copy of
the photograph (dossier) to law enforcement.
CONNECTICUT
Connecticut generally supports the policy position.
We have a few questions and comments as follows:
Connecticut shares digitized license images with all
authorized law enforcement officials and agencies on
an “inquiry” basis (of which a journal-type record is
kept). We do not share or release the file to any other
agency, i.e., “file drop.” It appears that the proposed
policy also adopts this position. Are we correct?
FLORIDA
The state of Florida agrees and has already enacted
the policy.
IDAHO
We do support this policy.
We recommend further definition of "certified law
enforcement agency" as referenced in the policy
statement. It sometimes becomes difficult to
differentiate between legitimate law enforcement
personnel and others.
We use the term "Peace officer" meaning any
employee of a police or law enforcement agency
which is a part of or administered by the state or any
political subdivision thereof and whose duties include
and primarily consist of the prevention and detection
of crime and the enforcement of penal, traffic or
highway laws of this state or any political
subdivision.
ILLINOIS OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF
STATE
The Illinois Secretary of State’s office supports this
proposal. In fact, we already have an image exchange
policy with some state agencies. Should this proposal
pass; Illinois urges the need to focus on setting
standards for use and stringent sanctions for misuse.
ILLINOIS STATE PATROL
ISP concurs with AAMVA, law enforcement would
benefit greatly from a Drivers License Digital Photo
Record Program. This would allow law enforcement
the ability to identify suspected criminals or victims
more quickly enhancing our enforcement efforts.
INDIANA
None.
MICHIGAN
Michigan can support this proposal if a definition of
law enforcement is included; however Michigan
statute may require a change. An interpretation (or
change) of the law may be required to allow non-
Michigan agencies direct access to image data. The
current legislative parameters provided by 257.307,
read in part:
“A law enforcement agency of this state has
access…” And continues to read, “This
information may be utilized for any law
enforcement purpose unless otherwise prohibited
by law.”
The policy should include a definition of law
enforcement.
NEVADA
At this time, the department does provide a hard copy
image to law enforcement agencies at no cost. There
has been discussion for the Department of Public
Safety to have a separate server with a copy of the
DMV’s database to access images. Law enforcement
currently cannot access either our primary or
secondary servers due to impacts in production in the
field offices.
We would like clarification for sending the image
electronically. We have a concern regarding the
images sent through e-mail systems from one agency
to another, as e-mail is not a secure environment. The
department will need to be very cautious with the
electronic transmission of these images. It may be
prudent for the department to complete hold harmless
agreements with any law enforcement agencies that
want the image to be e-mailed.
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NEW BRUNSWICK
New Brunswick agrees with this policy statement.
Sound legislation will be required referencing the
specific authority of law enforcement agencies and
the application of the digital photos in order to avoid
potential transgression of the intent of the policy.
Although 80% of its driving population has photo
IDs on its driver’s license, they are still not
mandatory.
NEW JERSEY
Support.
NORTH CAROLINA
We've reviewed the proposed policies and find no
reason to oppose any one of the five.
ONTARIO
Ontario supports this initiative. In some Canadian
jurisdictions, the dissemination of digital images to
law enforcement is limited. There may be issues that
need to be resolved with Ontario’s Information and
Privacy Commissioner, although proposed controls
on access should minimize concerns about misuse.
An enhancement to the existing protocol will be
required to expedite processing requests while
protecting against unauthorized use.
OREGON
Oregon already provides law enforcement with
electronic access to images via a pilot program with
WINPHO. Oregon laws already give law
enforcement access to photos in hard copy, but they
must cover the cost. It seems to make more sense to
share photos between DMV's. This policy like the
previous one seems to be aimed just at homeland
security when there are many broader issues of fraud
to be addressed as well.
PENNSYLVANIA
Pennsylvania currently provides law enforcement
with access to our imaging database 24 hours a day, 7
days a week via J-Net. We support this policy.
SOUTH DAKOTA
No comments. SD allows access to our images
through the Division of Criminal Investigation.
TEXAS
Our agency deals with motor vehicle records, while
driver’s license and identification card records are
maintained by the Texas Department of Public
Safety. We have forwarded a copy of Policy #1 and
Policy #2 to the Texas Department of Public Safety
for their response, as they deem appropriate.
WEST VIRGINA
Already offer limited access to photo database
restricted to law enforcement on a case-by-case basis.
WASHINGTON
#2 would require amendment to RCW 46.20.118,
since images are currently available to law
enforcement only for investigation of suspected
criminal activity. I wouldn't expect any
constitutional issues regarding the use of the
Department's image files for routine verification of
identity by law enforcement, but there would
probably be some concerns in the
legislature regarding privacy.
Addendum #2
Interstate Digital Image Exchange
The Interstate Digital Image Exchange, which facilitates exchange of digital driver’s license
photographs among the state driver licensing agencies, would cost $5 million over two years.
This program will significantly help in those situations where matches are returned from the
Commercial Driver’s License Information System (CDLIS) and the Problem Driver Pointer
System (PDPS). With the current capabilities of CDLIS and PDPS, it is sometimes difficult for a
driver licensing agency to accurately determine if the subject of the CDLIS/PDPS match is or is
not the person applying for a license in their state. For example, this program will make it easier
to determine whether or not the person applying for a license is the same person that PDPS
indicates is revoked in another state. Digital photographs would be exchanged in the following
ways:
Intrastate: A driver already licensed in a state, coming back into a branch office in that same
state, can be identified (some states already have this capability, some do not).
Interstate: When someone applies for a driver’s license in a state other than the one where the
applicant is currently licensed, the driver history information and photograph from the current
state can be sent to the new state for identity verification purposes.
This project will provide funds for the implementation of digital image exchange among all 50
states and the District of Columbia that participate in CDLIS and PDPS.
Note: This project does not apply biometric matching technology. The driver photo is exchanged
so that licensing personnel can look at the photo and at the person applying for a license to
determine if the person applying is indeed the subject of the CDLIS or PDPS match. This
improves highway safety in that those seeking to escape driver control action will be more easily
detected. Considering the myriad types of cargo commercial vehicles transport, including
hazardous materials, identifying unfit drivers is essential to protecting America’s highways. It
also better protects those innocent citizens that are currently being falsely identified as problem
drivers."








 
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JustaCaveman

  • Guest
Id Cards and Driver's License Specs and Desires
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2005, 04:37:19 pm »

Part 3 of this information session including how this sceme was hoped to be implemented:

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Addendum #3
It is envisioned that Law Enforcement Agencies having multi-jurisdictional
access to digital images would subscribe, at their cost, to a digital
certificate and PKI system. This system would be administered or
contracted by AAMVA.
Exchange of Digital Image and Driver Data
Policy & Procedures
Certificate Practice Statement (CPS)
and Certificate Policy (CP)
for a Host Agency AAMVA Net)
Public Key Infrastructure (PKI)
Overview
To ensure only AAMVAnet authorized users are allowed access to information on the AAMVA
Web digital image access network, a Certificate Policy (CP) should be developed to define the
policy for use of browser certificates on AAMVA net the AAMVA access network. Prior to the
distribution of images and personal data to law enforcement agencies or other appropriate parties,
it is critical to consider the privacy of the individual data. Therefore the AAMVA host agency
will develop policies and procedures to protect the information and control the flow. This
document provides samples for the implementation and operational Public Key Infrastructure
(PKI) to support a certificate issuing process within any AAMVAnet AAMVA access network.
A Certificate Policy is the foundation of trust and integrity in a PKI. A Certificate Policy is
defined as "a named set of rules that indicates the applicability of a certificate to a particular
community and/or class of application with common security requirements." The AAMVA Net
Certificate Authority (CA) is responsible for generating, issuing and revoking user certificates
that assert the AAMVA Net certificate policy.
A CP definition is registered and assigned a unique Object Identifier (OID), which is carried in a
standard extension field of an X.509 certificate. By inspecting this field in a certificate, a
certificate-using system may be able to determine automatically that a particular certificate is
suitable for use for a particular application. The CP is asserted by a CA during the process of
certification. This CP and the enforcing of the associated rules defined by this CP are solely
within the control of the CA named by the “Issuer DN” of all certificates certified by the CA.
The Registration Authority (RA), as an agent of the CA, is responsible for sending user (End
Entity) certificate requests to the CA and for notifying users when a certificate has been issued.
The CA may assign other responsibilities to the RA while remaining accountable for the activities
of both the CA and the RA.
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The purpose of this CP is to create confidence in certificates issued by the AAMVA Net PKI in
accordance with these security requirements, by establishing procedures and protective measures
in order to minimize financial, operative and legal threats and risks. Certificates issued by the
AAMVA Net PKI under this policy may be used solely for the purposes of gaining access to
restricted web sites that require a certificate asserting this policy to be presented by the end user.
This CP defines the policy for meeting the assurance requirements to be enforced by the elements
within the AAMVA Net PKI. This CP specifies the rules and policies that have been established
by hosting agency (Party 1) that apply to the PKI and its components. This CP addresses under
what rules the host agency operates its PKI, and the duties, responsibilities, and liabilities of those
that operate it. It further sets forth the policy governing the issuance and management of
certificates permitted to be used in this PKI, for the purposes listed below.
The AAMVA Net PKI provides the flexible certificate management architecture required for
certification and digital signature processes to be accepted as having legal effect. The core of the
architecture is built on industry standards and recognized security technologies.
Issuance of a public key certificate under this CP does not imply that the user has any authority to
conduct business transactions on behalf of the host agency.
This document includes three addendums with samples for the host agency:
Addendum 3(a) Exchange of Digital Image and Driver Data Policy & Procedures
Sample Table of Contents
Addendum 3(B) Sample Subscriber Agreement
Addendum 3© Sample Memorandum of Understanding
Note: Much of the material and samples from Addendum (3, 3a-c) were generated from
materials prepared by Florida Department of Law Enforcement. The wording in Addendum 3 has
been modified to reflect an AAMVA Network access path and does not constitute an absolute
outline or a design of the pathway that will be ultimately utilized. Jurisdictions should work
within their own legal framework to prepare suitable documents and policies that would
accommodate law enforcement access to images and demographic data and provide integrity to
that access process. For more specific information on the CJNet Digital Certificate security, it is
recommended jurisdictions contact the Florida Department of Law Enforcement.
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Addendum 3(a)
Exchange of Digital Image and Driver Data Policy & Procedures
Sample Table of Contents
Any comprehensive procedures packet should include basic directions for exchanging and
protection the information. The listing below offers an example of some of the topics to be
covered in a Policy & Procedures Manual.
This list should not be considered inclusive. Each jurisdiction and agency should consider its
own needs, legal requirements and legislative regulations when promulgating such a manual.
AAMVA is grateful to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) for providing this
outline:
Introduction
Overview
Identification
Community and Applicability
Policy Approval Authority
Policy Creation Authority
Certificate Authority
Registration Authority
Points of Contact
End Entities
Relying Parties
Applicability
Contact Information
Administration Information
Contact person
Person Determining Suitability of the CPS to this CP
General Provisions
Obligations
PAA/PCA and CA Obligations
RA Obligations
POC Obligations
End Entity (User) Obligations
Relying Party Obligations
Repository Obligations
Liability
CA Liability
RA Liability
Financial Responsibility
Interpretation and Enforcement
Governing Law
Specific Provisions
Dispute Resolution
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Fees
Publication and Repository
Publication of AAMVA Net PKI Information
Frequency of Publication
Access to Information
Repositories
Compliance Audit
Frequency of Compliance Audit
Identity and Qualifications of Auditor
Auditor's Relationship to Audited Party
Topics Covered by Audit
Actions Taken Consequent to Audit
Communication of Results
Privacy and Information Protection
Sensitivity of Types of Information
Acquisition and Disclosure of Private Information
Disclosure of Certificate Revocation Information
Permitted Release of Private Information
Release to Law Enforcement Officials
Intellectual Property Rights
Contractual Agreements
Identification and Authentication
Name Forms
Types of Names
Meaningfulness of Names
Rules for Interpreting Name Forms
Uniqueness of Names
Name Claim Dispute Resolution
I&A in Certificate Processing
Recognition and Role of Trademarks
Method to Prove Possession of Private Key
Verification of Organization Identity
Verification of Individual Identity
Validation of PKI Component
Certificate Life Cycle Operational Requirements
Application Process for User
Who can request a certificate
Certificate Request Process
Time to Process Request
Certificate Issuance
Certificate Acceptance
Certificate Use
Certificate Re-key, Renewal, Update, Modification
Certificate Re-key
Certificate Renewal
Re-key after Revocation
28
Certificate Revocation
Circumstances for Requesting Revocation
Certificate Revocation Request
Revocation Request Verification
Certificate Revocation Lists
Frequency
Latency
CRL Checking
Special Requirements on Key Compromise
Records Archival
Types of Events Recorded
Retention Period
Protection of Archive
Archive Back-up
Time-stamping
Archive Collection
Archive Information Verification
Key Change-over
Compromise and Disaster Recovery
Compromise Recovery
Disaster Recovery and Contingency Planning
Corruption of Computing Resources
Facility Security and Disaster Recovery
Environmental Security
Physical Security
PAA/PCA Physical Security
CA Physical Security
RA Physical Security
POC Physical Security
Physical Access Controls
Power and Air-conditioning
Water Exposure
Fire Prevention and Protection
Media Storage
Waste Disposal
Off-site Back-up
Procedural Controls
Trusted Roles
Identification and Authentication for Trusted Roles
Personnel Security
Screening
Background Checks
Training Requirements
Retraining Frequency
Job and Task Rotation
Sanctions for Unauthorized Actions
Contracting Personnel Requirements
Documentation Supplied to Personnel
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Technical and System Security
Key Pair Generation and Installation
Key Pair Generation
Private Key Delivery to Entity
User Public Key Delivery to Certificate Issuer
Trusted Distribution of Authority Public Keys
PCA/CA Public Key Delivery to Users/Issuers
Key Sizes
Key Generation
Key Usage Purpose
Private Key Protection
Standards for Cryptographic Module
Private Key Multi-person Control
Private Key Escrow
Private Key Back-up
Private Key Archival
Private Key Entry into Cryptographic Module
Method of Activating Private Key
Method of Deactivating Private Key
Method of Destroying Private Key
Other Aspects of Key Pair Management
Public Key Archival
Usage Periods for Public and Private Keys
Activation Data
Activation Data Generation and Installation
Activation Data Protection
Other Aspects of Activation Data
Computer Security
Specific Computer Security Technical Requirements
Computer Security Rating
Life Cycle Technical Controls
System Development Controls
Security Management Controls
Life Cycle Security Rating
Network Security Controls
Cryptographic Module Engineering Controls
Security Audit Procedures
Types of Events Recorded
Frequency of Processing Log
Retention of Audit Log
Protection of Audit Logs
Audit Log Back-up Procedures
Audit Collection System
Notification to Event-causing Subject
Vulnerability Assessments
30
Certificate and CRL Profiles
Certificate Profile
Version Number(s)
Certificate Extensions
Algorithm Object Identifiers
Name Forms
Name Constraints
Certificate Policy Object Identifier
Usage of Policy Constraints Extensions
Policy Qualifiers Syntax and Semantics
Processing Semantics for the Critical Certificate Policy Extensions
CRL Profile
Version Number(s)
CRL and CRL Entry Extensions
Specific Administration
Specification Change Procedure
Items that can change without Notification
Change with Notification
Notification Mechanism
Publication and Notification Procedures
CPS Approval Procedures
31
Addendum #3(B)
SAMPLE
SUBSCRIBER AGREEMENT
Exchange of Digital Image and Driver Data
This SUBSCRIBER AGREEMENT (Agreement) will become effective on the date you
submit the certificate application to the designated Registration Authority (RA). By
submitting this Subscriber Agreement (and certificate application) you are requesting
that the RA Issue a Digital ID (certificate) to you and are expressing your Agreement to
the terms of this Subscriber Agreement. (The host agency name goes here) Certification
Services are governed by (Party 1 - host agency name goes here) Certification Practice
Statement (the "CPS") as amended from time to time, which is incorporated by reference
into this Subscriber Agreement. The CPS is available on request from (Party 1) and is
available via e-mail from: (Party 1).
You agree to use the Digital ID (certificate) and any related RA services only in
accordance with the CPS.
The RA provides limited warranties, disclaims all other warranties, including warranties
of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose, limits liability, and excludes all
liability for incidental, consequential, and punitive damages as stated in the CPS. See the
CPS for important details.
You demonstrate your knowledge and acceptance of the terms of this subscriber (Party 1)
or (ii) using the Digital ID (certificate) whichever occurs first.
SAMPLE
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Addendum #3©
It is envisioned that Law Enforcement Agencies requesting multi-jurisdictional access
to digital images would enter into an Agreement with participating jurisdictions or the
AAMVA network.
SAMPLE
MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING
Digital Image Exchange
This Memorandum of Understanding is entered into by and between (Party 1 – host
sight) and (Party 2 – requesting agency), in furtherance of their respective duties under
law for the purpose of facilitating (Party 1) grant of access to (Party 1) records to (Party
2). (Party 1) and the (Party 2) agree as follows:
1. (Party 1) agrees, pursuant to state law sections xxxx(x), and sections xxxx(x), to
provide to (Party 2) electronic access to (Party 1) driver and commercial licenses
and to identification card data including, but not limited to, digital photographs.
2. (Party 1) agrees to provide this data to (Party 2) in a comprehensive downloaded
form during the first week of each month, utilizing a mutually agreeable transfer
medium.
3. (Party 2) agrees to maintain an electronic log documenting all access to this data
in its custody, for use by either (Party 2) or (Party 1) for investigations into
suspected wrongful data access or dissemination, for audit purposes or for any
other lawful purpose. (Party 2) further agrees to retain such logs for two years or
such other reasonable period as the parties may later stipulate to consistent with
the requirements of Section xxxx(x).
4. The (Party 1) and (Party 1) agree that this data will be made accessible through
(agency designation) and will be provided for law enforcement purposes only.
(Party 2) will control such access to prevent or discourage use of the photos or
other (Party 1) - provided data in the creation of individualized agency or
investigator databases, "in bulk" downloads, or otherwise for the creation of
stand-alone systems. (Party 1) will issue each program application user
accessing this data a unique user name and password and implement any other
appropriate system security protocols to restrict data access to authorized
personnel. (Party 2) will immediately notify (Party 1) of any violation of this
section.
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5. This Memorandum of Understanding represents the entire agreement between the
parties on this subject matter. (Party 1) maintains individual Agency Security
Agreements with each participating agency. Any alteration or amendment of the
provisions of this agreement shall be in writing, duly signed by authorized
personnel of each of the parties and attached to the original of this agreement
6. (Party 1) and (Party 2) recognize that, pursuant to applicable case law, in order
to determine whether or not to disclose exempt record information, “the primary
focus must be on the statutory classification of the information sought rather than
upon in whose hands the information rests.” See also, Government in the xxxx
Manual (ed.), pg. xxx, xxx. Thus, contractors who are accessing driving records
and digital photographs must ensure that the ultimate end users of the records are
complying with s. xxxx and s. xxxx state Statutes. See, also xxxx v. State, xxxx
xxxx (applicability of a particular exemption is determined by the document being
withheld, not by the identity of the agency possessing the record).
7. (Party 2) will protect the data downloaded pursuant to this agreement, and will
keep and maintain a dissemination log. Furthermore, (Party 1) recognizes that it
is its responsibility to assure the required compliance with (appropriate sections
listed here) and (appropriate state statute listed here).
8. (Party 2) will agree to defend (Party 1) should (Party 2) and /or (Party 1) be
sued in connection with this Memorandum of Understanding.
9. (Party 1) will continue to be the source for driver license records and information
pursuant to Chapter xxx, state Statutes. (Party 2) agrees to refer inquiries for
driver license records and information to (Party 1).
10. This agreement shall become effective upon signing by authorized representatives
of both parties, and may be terminated upon thirty (30) days notice by mutual
agreement of the parties.
___________________________________ ____________________________________
xxxx xxxx
Commissioner Director
(Party 1) (Party 2)
Date _______________________________ Date _______________________________
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Attachment A
AAMVA Proposed Policy # 2 - New LE Policy
Introduced at the LE Fall Meeting
St. Louis, Missouri on November 17, 2002
Image Exchange
A proposed policy that would allow law enforcement access to the digital image of
drivers license and identification card holders. This access would be strictly controlled
to authorized law enforcement agencies and personnel only with penalties and sanctions
for the misuse of the images.
POLICY STATEMENT
AAMVA endorses the concept of providing access to digital photos (images) on record at the
motor vehicle agency to approved law enforcement agencies for the purpose of verifying identity.
Specific procedures for the request and exchange of such images will be left to the specific motor
vehicle agency. Included in the policies for the exchange of such images should be a list of
penalties and sanctions for the misuse of such images.
AAMVA does not endorse the policy of requesting images for the use in police “photo line-ups”.
PURPOSE
To assist law enforcement with homeland security efforts. The availability to access subject
images will also assist with officer safety when the officer is more assured of the individual’s
identity.
BACKGROUND
To support a policy requesting that all drivers license agencies provide a digital image either
electronically or hard copy upon request by a certified law enforcement agency.
Specific directives and standards must be included in the final policy proposal to include that
sanctions be imparted for the misuse of this procedure and that they not be used for photo lineups.
FISCAL IMPACT
Any additional costs would be for the cost of access by law enforcement to the motor
vehicle agency where the images are stored.
CUSTOMER SERVICE IMPACT
There should be no impact on customer service since the image is already acquired at
time of application.
35
SPONSORS
Lt. Col. Mark Trostel
Colorado State Patrol
700 Kipling Street
Suite 3000
Denver, CO 80215 USA
T: 303-239-4494 | F: 303-239-4481
Email: mark.trostel@cdps.state.co.us
Major John H. Hill
Indiana State Police
Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Division
5252 Decatur Blvd. Suite J
Indianapolis, IN 46241
T: 317-615-7419 / F: 317-821-2350
jhill@isp.state.in.us
LEGISLATIVE HISTORY
LE Fall Meeting: Passed.
Legal Services: Legally sufficient.
Jurisdiction Comments: Attached
Board of Directors: Approved
Membership: Approved
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Attachment B
International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP)
RESOLUTION
Bar Codes on Motor Vehicle Licenses
Submitted by Division of State and Provincial Police (S&P)
Approved by the Membership, Toronto, Ontario, 2001
WHEREAS, the ability of law enforcement agencies in different states to quickly access
information about any driver operating in a particular state is an important safety concern
to both the law enforcement officer and members of the public; and
WHEREAS, the ability to scan information regarding a motor vehicle operator into a
database that interfaces with motor vehicle and law enforcement agencies throughout the
country will increase safety to both law enforcement and the public by providing current
information as the individual’s present ability to legally operate a motor vehicle, by
identifying any outstanding warrants, and assist in identifying potentially dangerous
individuals; now therefore, be it
RESOLVED, that the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) duly
assembled at its 108th Annual conference (2001) in Toronto, Ontario encourages the
enactment of a Federal law that would provide for identifying information about all
motor vehicle operators to be included in a bar code on motor vehicle licenses that would
interface with state and federal law enforcement and motor vehicle agencies when
scanned.
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Attachment C
International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP)
RESOLUTION
Guidelines for Improving Automated Criminal History Record Systems
and Effective Screening of Personnel
Submitted by Division of State and Provincial Police (S&P)
Approved by the Membership, 109th Annual Conference, 2002
WHEREAS, the IACP Private Sector Liaison Committee (PSLC) has collaborated with
the Department of Defense (DOD) Personnel Security Research Center (PERSEREC) to
produce “Guidelines for Improved Automated Criminal History Record Systems and
Effective Screening of Personnel”; and
WHEREAS, incomplete and inaccurate automated criminal history information can
jeopardize law enforcement investigations and place police personnel and the public at
risk; and
WHEREAS, the DOD, law enforcement, local, state, and federal government agencies,
non-profit and for-profit agencies all draw on the same criminal justice agency resources
through their shared interest in appropriate and reliable criminal background screening of
personnel; and
WHEREAS, incomplete and inaccurate automated criminal history information at state
criminal history data repositories increases the need for requestors to also seek criminal
information from individual criminal justice agencies, which can risk wasting scarce
agency resources, and
WHEREAS, the guide has been prepared in a similar manner to earlier joint efforts
between the PSLC and PERSEREC, entitled Combating Workplace Violence: Guidelines
for Employers and Law Enforcement and Guide for Preventing and Responding to
School Violence; and
WHEREAS, representatives of the IACP, PERSEREC, DOD, SEARCH, NASCO,
IASIR, FBI’s CJIS, state repositories, state licensing agencies, international agencies, and
the private sector have reviewed and edited the input from content experts from around
the world and from 10 focus groups held across America involving national, state, and
local law enforcement, state criminal records repositories, social services, and private
industry; now, therefore, be it
38
RESOLVED that the IACP encourages all criminal justice agencies to submit complete
and accurate criminal history information to their state criminal history repositories and
recommends the use of the Guidelines for Improved Automated Criminal History Record
Systems and Effective Screening of Personnel as a tool for enabling and supporting
appropriate use of centralized, automated criminal history record information to screen
personnel for positions of trust.
39
Attachment D
International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP)
RESOLUTION
Support for Funding and Development of New Identification and
Communications Technology
Submitted by Criminal Justice Information System Committee
Approved by the Membership, 2002
WHEREAS, during the past twenty years, the International Association of Chiefs of
Police (IACP) has witnessed some of the greatest technological advances of the 20th
century; and
WHEREAS, these technologies include Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems,
DNA, the Internet and Intranets with web-based applications, middle-ware technology
that allows the linking of existing systems into virtual systems, the electronic sharing of
digitized images, to name a few; and
WHEREAS, the IACP recognizes that these systems are costly and require technical
resources to pursue, acquire and support the utilization of current and new technologies;
and
WHEREAS, the IACP also recognizes that utilization of these technologies and new
technologies that will be developed in the 21st century will be a major key in the
successful prevention and resolution of crime; recovery of stolen property and missing
persons; and the identification, apprehensions and prosecution of criminals; now
therefore be it
RESOLVED, that the IACP will encourage and assist local agencies in the acquisition of
funding and resources to promote the development of integrated criminal justice systems;
implementation of Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems that allow sharing of
fingerprint minutia, instantaneous identification of criminals, and electronic compilation
of criminal history data; development and implementation of standardized data element
definitions that allow for the electronic exchange of criminal justice information;
advancement of Internet and Intranet technologies and web-based applications that
reduce the cost of accessing and transporting information over networks; development
and implementation of middle-ware that will unite independent systems into virtual
systems that will enable instantaneous sharing of information and elimination of
duplicate entry of data; utilization of digitized images and the effective sharing of such
40
images, acquisition of mobile digital technologies that enable law enforcement officers to
have instantaneous, electronic access to information, and identification and utilization of
other new and innovative technologies that will assist in the prevention and resolution of
crime, recovery of stolen property and missing persons, and the identification,
apprehension and prosecution of criminals.
41
Attachment E
International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP)
RESOLUTION
Support for National Uniform Standards for Driver's Licenses
and Identification Cards
Submitted by Highway Safety Committee
Approved by the Membership, 109th Annual Conference, 2002
WHEREAS, the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA) has
established a national Task Force on Identification Security; and
WHEREAS, this Task Force, which has included IACP members and other
representatives of law enforcement; and
WHEREAS, driver’s licenses and non-driver’s identification cards issued by
Departments of Motor Vehicles have become de facto the primary means of identifying
individuals from the age of 16 onward in the United States and Canada for a variety of
purposes; and
WHEREAS, the current climate of heightened domestic security makes it more
important than ever to ensure the reliability and security of driver’s licenses; and
WHEREAS, AAMVA is developing a system called Driver Identification and
Verification System (DRIVerS) that will include standardizing the definition of
residency among all jurisdictions; having the expiration date of licenses issued to noncitizens
coincide with the expiration of their visas; the use of one or more unique
identifiers and interconnectivity of data bases between vital statistic offices and other
appropriate agencies; pointer systems to identify problem drivers and security risks; anticounterfeiting
security features, overt and covert, embedded in licenses; and better
training of DMV employees in the detection of fraudulent identification documents; and
WHEREAS, the success of DRIVerS will require changes in federal, state and
provincial laws and regulations, the availability of federal funding, and cooperation
among federal, state and provincial agencies at a level never before experienced; now,
therefore, be it
42
RESOLVED, that the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) urges its
members to strongly support the work of the Task Force on Identification Security,
thanks the AAMVA for its pioneering efforts, and urges AAMVA to continue to involve
national, provincial, state and local law enforcement agencies in the development and
training process; and be it
FURTHER RESOLVED, that the IACP would support federal legislation that would
provide national standards for the issuance of driver’s licenses provided that the
following conditions are addressed:
  The legislation must set forth certain minimum standards to ensure that the information
used to establish an individual’s identity at the time he or she applies for a driver’s
license is valid and accurate and consistent from state to state;
  The legislation should set forth a requirement that driver’s licenses contain both a unique
identifier, such as a fingerprint, and anti-counterfeiting security devices;
  The legislation should encourage states to link databases so that licensing agencies and
law enforcement personnel in other states will be able to access an individual’s criminal
and motor vehicle traffic violation history in order to assist in the identification of
potential criminal suspects or problem drivers;
  The legislation should also increase the penalties for identity theft and identity fraud; and
  The legislation should provide states with incentives to act and not penalize states with
sanctions for the failure to act.
43
Attachment F
International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP)
RESOLUTION
Electronic Transfer of Public Safety Information
Submitted by Highway Safety Committee
Approved by the Membership, 104th Annual Conference, 1997
WHEREAS, Electronic information technology is an integral component of most facets
of modern society; and
WHEREAS, Continued advancement in electronic information technologies are
inevitable; and
WHEREAS, Digitization and computerization of data will become the predominant data
media in the future; and
WHEREAS, Computerization of information is capable of improving access to, and
transfer of, information from multiple sources; and
WHEREAS, Data sharing among public service agencies is capable of improving public
services; and
WHEREAS, Effective law enforcement in contemporary society requires quick access to
information from a variety of sources, including law enforcement agencies, departments
of transportation, departments of motor vehicles, and others; now, therefore, be it
RESOLVED, That the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), duly
assembled at its 104th Annual Conference in Orlando, Florida (1997), encourages all
countries and political subdivisions thereof to provide financial support for
computerization, data access, data transfer, and data sharing technologies for public
safety agencies, and that the formats adopted will be such that data may be shared with
other jurisdictions.
44
Attachment G
International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP)
RESOLUTION
Approved by the IACP Highway Safety Committee
at mid-year meeting in Louisville, KY, June 4, 2003
LAW ENFORCEMENT ACCESS TO
DRIVERS LICENSE DIGITAL IMAGES
A proposed policy that would allow law enforcement access to the digital image of drivers license
and identification card holders. This access would be strictly controlled to authorized law
enforcement agencies and personnel only with penalties and sanctions for the misuse of the
images.
WHEREAS, electronic information technology is an integral component of most facets
of modern society; and
WHEREAS, continued advancement in electronic information technologies are
inevitable; and
WHEREAS, digitization and computerization of data will become the predominant data
media in the future; and
WHEREAS, computerization of information is capable of improving access to, and
transfer of, information from multiple sources; and
WHEREAS, data sharing among public service agencies is capable of improving
national security, officer safety, public and highway safety; and
WHEREAS, effective law enforcement in contemporary society requires quick access to
information from a variety of sources, including law enforcement agencies, departments
of transportation, departments of motor vehicles, and others; now, therefore, be it
RESOLVED, That the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), endorses
the concept of providing access to digital photos (images) on record at the motor vehicle
agency to approved law enforcement agencies for the purpose of verifying identity.
FURTHER RESOLVED that specific procedures for the request and exchange of such
images will be left to the specific motor vehicle agency. Included in the policies for the
exchange of such images should be a list of penalties and sanctions for the misuse of such
images.:

More at a later time as information comes in.  this post is long and perhaps not for everyone, but it is what will rule your lives should you choose to live in the confines or a police state.  Prepare and know who wants to fight freedom.

Take it Easy



 
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Loxosceles_Reclusa

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Id Cards and Driver's License Specs and Desires
« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2005, 06:19:14 pm »


 Well, that's a lot to digest at one sitting, but I'm glad the information has been gathered together in one place this way.

 And it's almost comical the way they still persist in the fiction that any of this has *anything* to do with traffic safety. :rolleyes:

 They've sort of got me where they want me for the time being. I don't have to fly, or I haven't had to since the Seventies, anyway. But I do have to be able to drive, *legally*. I can't just drive "license-free." I'm a super-unlucky guy: I *would* be caught.

 I saw all this coming almost 35 years ago, and I had hoped to be properly prepared for it all by now, but I couldn't make it happen. In particular I had hoped to arrange my life so as to reduce or eliminate my dependence on motor vehicles, but I couldn't do that either.

 Lox
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JustaCaveman

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Id Cards and Driver's License Specs and Desires
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2005, 08:24:15 pm »

That site is a hoot for me.  i happen to be a "legislator assistant" over there.  maybe i'll give you guys some "secrets", in due time.  the AAMVA and these guys are running the new National ID cards.
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Desertrat

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Id Cards and Driver's License Specs and Desires
« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2005, 09:46:42 pm »

There are so many ironies in all this that it's hard to know where to begin.

The feds started the push to use SS #s for ID, which has made identity theft easier.

The very need for ID has meant the rise of a helluva black market in fake IDs.

The technological advances, including computers, that help the world of law enforcement with all this stuff also help those who are on the other side of the fence in making fake IDs.

Around and around and around.

"We have met the enemy and he is us and them, both."

'Rat
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Alton Speers

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  • Posts: 1850
Id Cards and Driver's License Specs and Desires
« Reply #7 on: January 23, 2005, 07:29:11 am »

Great work Caveman!

Alton
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Delos

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Id Cards and Driver's License Specs and Desires
« Reply #8 on: January 23, 2005, 09:39:57 am »


Defeat the system--stop getting yourself licensed!

Nearly two years license-free now!

:P  
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