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Author Topic: Bodhran  (Read 1415 times)

Tipitaka

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Bodhran
« on: August 07, 2013, 10:05:59 pm »

So, I went to the Dublin Irish Festival in Dublin Ohio. Normal enough I suppose. I saw a Bodhran for sale for cheap (last day of the fest, so the guy was selling stuff at a discount) and bought it to replace the one I've been playing for the last 7 years which I have grown out of. Then I went to a High Kings concert... and by chance... I ended up metting the band. Brian Dunphy played my drum (first person to do so since it was new). They said it was to give me a bit of their Awen (Artistic Inspiration/Muse/Mojo). So it renewed my determination to master the instrument.
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Tipitaka

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Re: Bodhran
« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2013, 10:20:57 pm »

You can learn it too by following these 24 tutorials by Rónán Ó Snodaigh:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Kks-6c_tHA


Fun fact:
The origin of the frame drum (called a "Bodhran" in Ireland and Scotland) is unknown and its use is ubiquitous among the world's cultures. Theorhetically, you could play any comparable frame drum like the Irish play it.
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Scarmiglione'

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Re: Bodhran
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2013, 09:54:42 am »

Yeah, the frame drum is everywhere, but only the Irish find the most limiting way possible to play it.  ;)
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Tipitaka

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Re: Bodhran
« Reply #3 on: September 16, 2013, 07:29:40 pm »

Yeah, the frame drum is everywhere, but only the Irish find the most limiting way possible to play it.  ;)

The hardest for sure, but the fastest and most complex rhythm too.
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Scarmiglione'

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Re: Bodhran
« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2013, 08:32:39 am »

I"ll disagree with that. 

Essentially only two rhythms, jig and reel.  Variations within of course, but basically just that.  The tipper position allows for very fast play, yes, but the fills are generally from one direction, so there is not a lot of ornamentation coming from the tipper hand (at least compared to the middle eastern rhythms I've been learning recently)

Where the bodhran's strength and uniqueness comes from is the supporting hand and ability to dampen or alter resonance of the tipper strikes, including tonal shifts, and the variety of sounds that can be incorporated.  That's the cool part.  With some practice on that left hand altering tone from the strikes you can play melodies on the drum, something few percussion instruments can do.  Larger bodhrans make this easier and have a wider range.

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