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Author Topic: Teaching Government  (Read 2575 times)

Nedda of the Hill

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Teaching Government
« on: March 14, 2005, 10:49:31 pm »

I read this the other day, and thought I'd wait for the new homeschooling topic to post it to TCF:

Teaching Government Right by Arthur Robinson.

Quote
In learning about government (or anything else, for that matter), our children should not be taught to "trust and parrot." They should not be taught to form their principles and opinions by reading overviews, or watching news programs, in which the writer or anchorman leads them to interpret facts in accordance with his own agenda. History textbooks—especially modern politically-correct texts, and even those written by people in whom we have confidence—usually contribute to trust-and-parrot thinking. Students should be taught to learn about history and government by unabridged complete writings of those who made history and created government—and then forming their own opinions of the events.
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Junker

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Teaching Government
« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2005, 09:52:12 am »

Robinson Curriculum[/size]

by Arthur Robinson's students, his kids.

This is a key site in the freedom home schooling arena. There is much to observe about home schooling in the presentations at this site. Actually buying a copy of this curriculum is not really necessary, but it can be helpful depending on your needs.

The key idea notes that the common thought of schooling has things backwards. People don't need to be taught, but rather just the chance to learn. Beyond that, kids shouldn't be taught because that just robs them of the opportunity to learn how to learn. And if the kid doesn't learn how to learn, you often end up with a sub-adult who's partially brain dead-- ready to be a sheeple.

If you are going to home school, please, spend some time looking at this site.
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debeez

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Teaching Government
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2005, 10:01:49 am »

Nedda or Junker-
Do you use Robinson's curriculum?  I've been to his website a couple of times and poked around, but I like to peruse some actual examples of what the materials are (except for the book list) and I don't see any.  Just kind of curious if the curriculum is any good or not.

Is it just a conglomeration of info, or what?

 
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Christine
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http://thedeadlynightshade.com/
http://homeschooladvocate.org

Nedda of the Hill

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Teaching Government
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2005, 11:39:19 am »

I use the curriculum, though I don't necessarily use his course of study.  I'm much more relaxed in my schooling methods than he is.  

The books are pretty much it.  That is what is on the CDs (along with his course of study, vocabulary tests, flash cards, and tests on the books).  Some of the books I've found can be purchased from the Dover book company for next to nothing, but many of them are out of print and can't even be had through the library.

The only thing you really need to add to his curriculum is Saxon Math starting with Saxon 54.

I like it because of the emphasis on good books and on self-instruction.  I want my kids to be as independent as possible both physically and mentally.

My 7 yo son is reading Josephine Pollard's Life of Geo. Washington right now.  I printed it out on half pages of paper and stacked them with heavy books on top.  Then I use Aleen's Tacky Glue to coat the spine (several coats, dries clear and flexible) and put cardstock covers on with tape.  Voila, a book to read!  My 16 yo just finished reading The Law, by Frederic Bastiat.  Said she really liked it.  The tests over the reading material are set up like SAT questions.  When my daughter first took one she missed over half the questions.  The last one I gave her she aced.

It's a good curriculum and can easily be added to and molded to fit your own methods.
 
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