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Author Topic: Birthday party food and tradition  (Read 2162 times)

Baked at 420

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Birthday party food and tradition
« on: October 13, 2015, 05:58:47 pm »

Fairy Bread (In Australia and New Zealand, this refers to buttered white bread with sprinkles.)

You gotta have that at all kids' parties.  And the rice bubble cakes (clusters of rice bubbles held together with chocolate and icing sugar, but I guess that is an American staple too - I'm just thinking of what you have at kids' parties).

My kids are still reminding their cousin Leon (my sister's youngest) about his 2nd birthday party (25 years ago now) where my sister served tofu, raw milk, a carob cake, carrot sticks and a dish of alfalfa and steamed asparagus with homemade rye bread. 

No fairy bread for her, the sprinkles contain food coloring, and certainly no chocolate, but a 2 year old's party?

Never heard of the rice bubble cake. We have regular cakes; made of flour, milk, eggs, sugar, and chocolate. I used to HATE cake as a child, so my family always made me blueberry scones and tea with milk. I still love scones, but they're currently my #2, after cinnamon rolls.
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“If I survive, I will  spend my whole life at the oven door seeing that no one is denied bread  and, so as to give a lesson of charity, especially those who did not  bring flour.” ~Jose Marti

“Write in such a way as  that you can be readily understood by both the young and the old, by men  as well as women, even by children.” ~Ho Chi Minh

DiabloLoco

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Re: Birthday party food and tradition
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2015, 06:47:52 pm »



Never heard of the rice bubble cake.
I think that Americans use the name Rice Krispy treats. The difference in name is probably due to Kellogg using different names for the same product for different countries. The only difference in recipe that I can see, is that NZ uses honey in place of marshmallow.





Back on topic-

"That motor has more snap, crackle, and pop than a box of Rice Krispies! (The motor is about to die/is on it's last legs)
« Last Edit: October 13, 2015, 06:50:31 pm by DiabloLoco »
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mouse

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Re: Birthday party food and tradition
« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2015, 03:24:46 am »

You can get rice bubbles (or rice krispies) from a shop that sells bulk goods here, you just spoon them out of a bin into a plastic bag.  That works out to cost about half the price of what you'd pay if you bought a packet.  I have lots of plastic cereal containers that my daughter bought and I just keep filling them up.

The chocolate rice bubble thing (I'm not sure what it is actually called, but it has been around for ages as I even remember my own mother making them for us) is easy to make and you can do it in half an hour or so.  The longest part is melting the chocolate.

You just get a block of cooking chocolate, or actually any chocolate with a high cocoa ratio will do, and melt about half of it in a pot on the stove, when it is melted add about three table spoons of icing sugar, put it in a mixing bowl and add hydrogenated coconut oil - I think it is called copha - (or any hardened vegetable fat will do) - about 6 or 8 ounces, also melted and then chuck in (I say "chuck in" because I've never measured the quantity - maybe 2 or 3 cupfuls, some rice bubbles (or krispies) and lightly mix it in.  Put a spoonful in each of about 12 or so paper cupcake cases and leave to solidify over night or for a few hours, in the fridge.

They are really yummy.  My mother used to put in desiccated cocoanut and coloured sprinkles but I don't like cocoanut and I don't really have a "sweet tooth" so don't want the added sweetness of sprinkles.

I don't think this is any way a NZ thing.  American kids probably have had them for generations as well.  I just think they are a staple at kids' parties along with the little saveloy sausages and tomato sauce and the cookies with icing on and the cut up oranges.  Unfortunately the art of making food for kids' parties seems to be dying and more and more people are opting for McDonalds food for their kids or pizza.

Having young kids for the second time around (grandchildren) I am starting to feel like a (as my grandson puts it) dinosaur.  I make all these things for their parties now, but at their friends' parties, everything is bought and they don't even have fairy bread.

« Last Edit: October 14, 2015, 04:18:52 am by mouse »
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mouse

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Re: Birthday party food and tradition
« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2015, 03:28:38 am »

OK, maybe this thread has morphed into "colloquial food" now.  It's interesting to see the colloquialisms from different parts of America, I just can't think of any specific to NZ right now.

Be interesting to see what Americans bake for their kids' parties though.  Just assure me that you don't give your kids tofu.
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DiabloLoco

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Re: Birthday party food and tradition
« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2015, 05:32:43 am »

OK, maybe this thread has morphed into "colloquial food" now.  It's interesting to see the colloquialisms from different parts of America, I just can't think of any specific to NZ right now.

Be interesting to see what Americans bake for their kids' parties though.  Just assure me that you don't give your kids tofu.
Traditionally it's pizza, then cake and ice-cream. Real cake, not rice krispy treats. :laugh: Americans would never call that cake, nor do they call a cookie a "biscuit" or a potato chip a "crisp".

Mouse, if you call a rice krispy treat a "cake", then what do you call cake?
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MamaLiberty

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Re: Birthday party food and tradition
« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2015, 09:15:11 am »

Trust me, no "rice crispies" or other dry cereal were ever part of our diet when my kids were small... nor ever since. We also didn't have "birthday parties" as such, just a special meal at supper time, usually shared with the grandparents. The birthday child got to choose what they wanted me to prepare for supper. Spaghetti was a common choice, though we ate that at least once a week anyway. I made pizza sometimes, and once we had steak. I remember that time well because it was just after we'd butchered our first steer.

We did not normally have any dessert for meals, except fresh fruit, so birthdays called for home made ice cream most of the time. I seldom made a cake of any kind, but when I did it was a plain sheet cake, usually chocolate.

I've no idea what passes for birthday party fare these days. Probably every abomination you can think of. sigh
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Baked at 420

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Re: Birthday party food and tradition
« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2015, 10:20:05 am »

OK, maybe this thread has morphed into "colloquial food" now.  It's interesting to see the colloquialisms from different parts of America, I just can't think of any specific to NZ right now.

Be interesting to see what Americans bake for their kids' parties though.  Just assure me that you don't give your kids tofu.

I don't think I've been to a party with any of the stuff you mentioned.


Here's what my family usually makes for parties:
BBQ Dinner or Chili Verde
Regular Chocolate Cake and Icecream or Scones and Tea (latter if it's my birthday as cake is not my huckleberry)

Sometimes for parties, I make frybread with a sweet topping. This one is bananas foster and whipped cream: Picture
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“If I survive, I will  spend my whole life at the oven door seeing that no one is denied bread  and, so as to give a lesson of charity, especially those who did not  bring flour.” ~Jose Marti

“Write in such a way as  that you can be readily understood by both the young and the old, by men  as well as women, even by children.” ~Ho Chi Minh

DiabloLoco

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Re: Birthday party food and tradition
« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2015, 04:16:49 pm »

OK, maybe this thread has morphed into "colloquial food" now.  It's interesting to see the colloquialisms from different parts of America, I just can't think of any specific to NZ right now.

Be interesting to see what Americans bake for their kids' parties though.  Just assure me that you don't give your kids tofu.
Mouse....You have piqued my interest. I'm wondering, what other foods go by different names between our different locales? For NZ, are the words more in line with Britain, or are they unique to NZ?
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Baked at 420

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Re: Birthday party food and tradition
« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2015, 05:56:23 pm »

My friend Nacchin has a thing for Fairy Bread and Damper. But her mom usually makes Pho.
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“If I survive, I will  spend my whole life at the oven door seeing that no one is denied bread  and, so as to give a lesson of charity, especially those who did not  bring flour.” ~Jose Marti

“Write in such a way as  that you can be readily understood by both the young and the old, by men  as well as women, even by children.” ~Ho Chi Minh
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