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Author Topic: Numismatics (coin collecting)  (Read 12544 times)

DiabloLoco

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Numismatics (coin collecting)
« on: April 11, 2016, 08:33:20 am »

As many here know, I collect coins. I'm wondering if there are any other fellow numismatists here at TMM? I'd love to touch base and be able to share news from the coin world, discuss great finds/deals, and perhaps do some trading!

I have a feeling that any responses here will be from non-collectors spouting snark and nonsense, but I'm feeling optimistic.....Anybody interested?


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FDD

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Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2016, 09:31:57 am »

not really a coin collector, but am always willing to learn something new.
got some old coin from way back when.
more into PM now, but am open to new things.
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Jake

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Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2016, 09:54:37 am »

I found a 1921 D Mercury dime on the ground and was going to buy an ice cream cone with it.  That was a few years ago.  I sold that dime on Ebay for $128 three years ago.
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DiabloLoco

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Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2016, 03:11:16 pm »

not really a coin collector, but am always willing to learn something new.
got some old coin from way back when.
more into PM now, but am open to new things.

What is the coin? Year? Mint mark? Condition? I could appraise it for you.

I found a 1921 D Mercury dime on the ground and was going to buy an ice cream cone with it.  That was a few years ago.  I sold that dime on Ebay for $128 three years ago.


That's a great find! 21d is a key date for the Mercs. Too bad it wasn't a 16d! Would have been a heck of a lot more than $128! Do you know what the grade of the coin was?
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DiabloLoco

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Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2016, 03:17:10 pm »

Well....Julio, how about a coin that marries the two? A numismatic bullion coin! Only 125,000 will be minted. This coin will increase in numismatic value much more than a 1/10oz. Gold Eagle will. :mellow:

U.S. Mint Shares Pics and Mintage Info on Upcoming Gold Mercury Dimes
http://news.coinupdate.com/u-s-mint-shares-pics-and-mintage-info-on-upcoming-gold-mercury-dimes/



Quote
The Winged Liberty dime was designed by Adolph A. Weinmen. It’s obverse features an image of Liberty facing left and wearing a winged cap; Liberty’s resemblance in this design to the Roman god, Mercury, led to the issue being nicknamed the “Mercury dime.” Inscribed along the rim are LIBERTY, IN GOD WE TRUST, the artist’s initials, and 2016.

The coin’s reverse bears an illustration of a Roman fasces with an olive branch, along with the inscriptions UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, E PLURIBUS UNUM, ONE DIME, the West Point Mint’s “W” mint mark, AU 24K, and the item’s weight, 1/10 OZ.


The gold Mercury dime will be the first of three reissues celebrating the centenary of the first appearance of three classic circulation coins. The 1916 dime, quarter, and half dollar — originally 90% silver and bearing designs known as “Winged Liberty,” “Standing Liberty,” and “Walking Liberty,” respectively — will all be issued in .9999 24-karat gold this year.

The reissues will vary in size, roughly in accordance with the dimensions of the original pieces. As noted above, the Mercury dime will come as a 1/10 oz. piece, while the Standing Liberty quarter will be 1/4 oz. and the Walking Liberty half dollar will be the largest at 1/2 oz. Release dates for the latter two issues have yet to be determined.

I really want at least one of each! The coins first issued in 1916 are my 3 favorite US coin designs. Back before they started putting butthole politicians on them. :laugh: Well....except for Lincoln (1909), but don't get me started on THAT subject! :rolleyes:
« Last Edit: April 11, 2016, 03:38:28 pm by DiabloLoco »
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DiabloLoco

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Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2016, 03:18:54 pm »

Speaking of Mercury dimes, did you know that there is a fascist symbol on it? The fasces. A bundle of rods with an axe protruding from the center. The symbol originated from the Etruscan's, but was used by Rome as well. I think that it was used for the reverse of the Mercury dime to represent the power of the Supreme Court/Judicial Branch.



Even though the design was adopted well before the rise of Mussolini and the "Fascisti", it cause quite a stir in the US.

Our fascist dime
http://www.numismaticnews.net/flipside/our-fascist-dime

Quote
In 1936, a letter sent to the chairman of the House Committee on Coinage, Weights and Measures (reproduced in the October 1936 issue of The Numcm1916A.jpgismatist, the monthly publication of the American Numismatic Association), warned that:

“The fasces, which is the emblem of Fascism, the present form of government in Italy, strangely enough appears on the reverse of our dime. Although it appears on this coinage as early as 1916, and although it was not adopted by Mussolini and his followers until 1919, future world historians delving into the past through numismatics, as is often the custom, are liable to draw the conclusion that the United States and not Italy was the birthplace of fascism.

However, even with the uproar, the design was not changed until 1946. The design is still with us today. FDR, the bastard that started the income tax. :angry4:

« Last Edit: April 11, 2016, 03:36:56 pm by DiabloLoco »
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FDD

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Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2016, 03:54:26 pm »

hmmm, may have to get one of these dimes if they ever show up.
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If we want our grandchildren to be able to give thanks for being Americans, we'll need to.....start steering a course away from government control of our lives-and start moving back toward greater personal responsibility.   Ed Feulner

I think, therefore I am not a progressive liberal socialist marxist democrat

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Jake

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Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
« Reply #7 on: April 12, 2016, 12:46:18 am »

That's a great find! 21d is a key date for the Mercs. Too bad it wasn't a 16d! Would have been a heck of a lot more than $128! Do you know what the grade of the coin was?
There were at least 2 and barely 3 lines in the bindings of the wheat (or sticks) on the back.  It also had a die crack or blemish that was under the date which were on others of that mint but clearer.  If I could find a picture, I would share.  I found it in the mid 60's
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DiabloLoco

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Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
« Reply #8 on: April 20, 2016, 07:21:57 pm »

Thought that I would share a REALLY useful tool to help grade numismatic coins. Coin prices can vary wildly. Certain coins can increase in value by thousands of dollars by being just one single grade higher. For example, an 1893 Morgan dollar graded MS64 is valued over $2000, but the same coin in an MS65 is worth over $6000!

The useful tool that I am sharing is called "Photograde". It is a service provided by PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service). It shows high quality photos of the obverse (front) of the coin and the reverse (back) of the coin in every grade, from 0-70. Simply click the type of coin you are looking up, then scan the photos until you find one that looks exactly like your coin.

Next, once you have graded your coin you can then go to ebay and check the "sold" listings for that particular coin in that exact grade. This will give you a pretty accurate fair-market value. When you decide to sell the coin, you will be armed with this knowledge and can make sure that you don't get hosed by the buyer.

There is MUCH more to grading coins, but "Photograde" is a quick, fairly accurate way to cheat a bit. :mellow:


http://www.pcgs.com/photograde/


                     MS65
« Last Edit: April 20, 2016, 07:23:46 pm by DiabloLoco »
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FDD

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Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
« Reply #9 on: April 20, 2016, 08:02:41 pm »

Well....Julio, how about a coin that marries the two? A numismatic bullion coin! Only 125,000 will be minted. This coin will increase in numismatic value much more than a 1/10oz. Gold Eagle will. :mellow:

U.S. Mint Shares Pics and Mintage Info on Upcoming Gold Mercury Dimes
http://news.coinupdate.com/u-s-mint-shares-pics-and-mintage-info-on-upcoming-gold-mercury-dimes/



Quote
The Winged Liberty dime was designed by Adolph A. Weinmen. It’s obverse features an image of Liberty facing left and wearing a winged cap; Liberty’s resemblance in this design to the Roman god, Mercury, led to the issue being nicknamed the “Mercury dime.” Inscribed along the rim are LIBERTY, IN GOD WE TRUST, the artist’s initials, and 2016.

The coin’s reverse bears an illustration of a Roman fasces with an olive branch, along with the inscriptions UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, E PLURIBUS UNUM, ONE DIME, the West Point Mint’s “W” mint mark, AU 24K, and the item’s weight, 1/10 OZ.


The gold Mercury dime will be the first of three reissues celebrating the centenary of the first appearance of three classic circulation coins. The 1916 dime, quarter, and half dollar — originally 90% silver and bearing designs known as “Winged Liberty,” “Standing Liberty,” and “Walking Liberty,” respectively — will all be issued in .9999 24-karat gold this year.

The reissues will vary in size, roughly in accordance with the dimensions of the original pieces. As noted above, the Mercury dime will come as a 1/10 oz. piece, while the Standing Liberty quarter will be 1/4 oz. and the Walking Liberty half dollar will be the largest at 1/2 oz. Release dates for the latter two issues have yet to be determined.

I really want at least one of each! The coins first issued in 1916 are my 3 favorite US coin designs. Back before they started putting butthole politicians on them. :laugh: Well....except for Lincoln (1909), but don't get me started on THAT subject! :rolleyes:

I asked my guy here about if he was going to get any.
He said he was going to try, and that it would sell out in a matter of seconds when it went up for sale.
He thinks that they will go for over $250 a coin, that is like double the price for a 1/10 oz gold round.
WOW so I will see if he got any this weekend
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Nobody needs an AR-15
Nobody needs a whiny little bitch ether, yet here you are

If we want our grandchildren to be able to give thanks for being Americans, we'll need to.....start steering a course away from government control of our lives-and start moving back toward greater personal responsibility.   Ed Feulner

I think, therefore I am not a progressive liberal socialist marxist democrat

That's WY

Tahn L.

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Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
« Reply #10 on: April 20, 2016, 08:08:04 pm »

Thanks DiabloLoco !

  I have the Photograde book but did not realize it was online. I am sooo old and only a F/VF. :ph34r:
 If a coin is a rare one, I recommend a USGS certificate.
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DiabloLoco

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Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
« Reply #11 on: April 20, 2016, 08:24:43 pm »

Thanks DiabloLoco !

  I have the Photograde book but did not realize it was online. I am sooo old and only a F/VF. :ph34r:
 If a coin is a rare one, I recommend a USGS certificate.
NGC, PCGS, and ANACS are the most respected grading companies today. You don't get a certificate. You get your coin "slabbed". PCGS is the most prestigious grading company right now.





BTW- Being an F-12 or a VF-20 is a lot better than being an AG-3! :laugh:
« Last Edit: April 20, 2016, 08:27:36 pm by DiabloLoco »
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Tahn L.

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Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
« Reply #12 on: April 20, 2016, 08:43:32 pm »

Thanks again for the update and the compliment.
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All human beings have two dogs within them. A good dog and an evil dog. The evil dog is always attacking and fighting the good dog. Which one wins?
The one you feed!
  Native American Story

Government is a meme, woven within a supporting memeplex.

Who ever frames the argument, kicks ass.

From MamaLiberty; "The Price of Liberty (is) self ownership, self control, integrity and non-aggression."

"The lust to control the lives and property of others is the root of all evil". MamaLiberty

Jake

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Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
« Reply #13 on: April 21, 2016, 12:17:07 am »

Speaking of Mercury dimes, did you know that there is a fascist symbol on it? The fasces. A bundle of rods with an axe protruding from the center. The symbol originated from the Etruscan's, but was used by Rome as well. I think that it was used for the reverse of the Mercury dime to represent the power of the Supreme Court/Judicial Branch.



Even though the design was adopted well before the rise of Mussolini and the "Fascisti", it cause quite a stir in the US.

Our fascist dime
http://www.numismaticnews.net/flipside/our-fascist-dime

Quote
In 1936, a letter sent to the chairman of the House Committee on Coinage, Weights and Measures (reproduced in the October 1936 issue of The Numcm1916A.jpgismatist, the monthly publication of the American Numismatic Association), warned that:

“The fasces, which is the emblem of Fascism, the present form of government in Italy, strangely enough appears on the reverse of our dime. Although it appears on this coinage as early as 1916, and although it was not adopted by Mussolini and his followers until 1919, future world historians delving into the past through numismatics, as is often the custom, are liable to draw the conclusion that the United States and not Italy was the birthplace of fascism.

However, even with the uproar, the design was not changed until 1946. The design is still with us today. FDR, the bastard that started the income tax. :angry4:

The wrappings of the rods, I was told, was representing binding of the folks and the axe head was Roman as enforcer. . .
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Bill St. Clair

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Re: Numismatics (coin collecting)
« Reply #14 on: April 21, 2016, 09:16:26 am »

Just thought of this. Why has nobody minted gold coins containing a one-letter change to the motto printed on US coins:

In Gold We Trust

Apparently, it's not a new idea: https://www.google.com/search?q=%22in+gold+we+trust%22
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