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Author Topic: When is RFID not RFID?  (Read 2464 times)

Jack21221

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When is RFID not RFID?
« on: March 30, 2005, 06:06:37 am »

Here is an interesting article from Wired.:

http://www.wired.com/news/privacy/0,1848,67025,00.html

Quote
Computer scientists and data-encryption experts, the editors of an RFID industry journal -- even the makers of the contactless chips themselves -- all agree that the Homeland Security Department is using RFID technology.

But the Homeland Security Department is very carefully avoiding use of the term "RFID." The department, along with Philips, is also backing a trade group that is branding ID documents with RFID tags as "contactless smartcards."

"We'd prefer," said Joseph Broghamer, Homeland Security's director of authentication technologies, "that the terms 'RFID,' or even 'RF,' not be used at all (when referring to the RFID-tagged smartcards). Let's get 'RF' out of it altogether."

Newspeak, anyone?
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Jack Harrison

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When is RFID not RFID?
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2005, 07:08:02 am »

This doesn't surprise me at all. Whenever I sit in one of our meetings where current and proposed RFID projects are discussed, I can't help but notice the cringes on many faces in the room. I've been wondering when we were going to get around to changing the names of those projects, too.

One of the presentations I sat through had a "cute" little slide for the ending. To paraphrase "in the future when someone asks you about the chip on your shoulder, you'll respond with "what frequency?" I choked out loud, on purpose.
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Thunder

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When is RFID not RFID?
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2005, 08:39:04 am »

These aren't the droids you're looking for.

 
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sagas4

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When is RFID not RFID?
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2005, 11:29:02 am »

Mooooo . . .

Better yet: The January 19, 2005 issue of Farm World News Paper has an interesting article in Section B Titled : Kentucky Vet: Animal ID program is progressing

Key exercpts:

Quote


Quote:
Frankfort KY - One of the first steps in the state's efforts to implement the National Animal Identification System (NAIS) is being made as agriculture officials announce measures to start premesis ID's by the end of the month.

NAIS is a program . . . intended to identify specific animals in the United States and record their movement over their life spans.

State Vet. Dr. Robert Stout told the Kentucky Cattlemen's Assoc. (KCA) and producers they could obtain id numbers for farms and other places where animals are kept and sold. The Premesis ID is 1st of 2 phases.

By Sept. 2005 KY expects to have 50% of all livestock premesis identified. The 2nd phase is to begin chipping all animals. They will have a unique number entered into a national database.

Through the KCA and the Kentucky Beef Network (KBN) the state has become a national leader in ongoing efforts to bring the id program to reality.

John Stevenson of the KBN said, "We have worked slowly and cautiously for the last few years . . . We encourage producers to get their premesis numbers. Once NAIS is in place, those producers who already have their numbers will be ahead of the curve. 


I do not need to translate the key words here for those in this forum, but it does make me wonder what the heck farmers are thinking! And just who the heck is running their (the farmers) associations anyway. Gubmint planted folkes hell bent on subverting the rest of our freedoms or what? "They (gubmint) claim that this will protect the food supply".

I got news for everyone: WE ARE ALL ALREADY EATING FRANKEN-FOOD anyway with all the gene splicing going on. You ever tried to contain Maze Pollen?? The FRANKEN-CORN experiment has likely already contaminated a good chunk of the maze supply of North America.

Are the majority of people brain dead or what?

How many of us worker bees are there compared to the relative population of the Royal Family in the Hive? Just say No. Are they going to arrest 300 million of us?
 
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sagas4

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When is RFID not RFID?
« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2005, 11:34:14 am »

Now for School children,

Just say Moooooo . . . . Tooooo

Quote


Calif. school requires radio ID tags for students
Critics attack policy, seeing ‘Big Brother’ lurking in hallways

The Associated Press
Updated: 2:59 p.m. ET Feb. 10, 2005


SUTTER, Calif. - The only grade school in this rural town is requiring students to wear radio frequency identification badges that can track their every move. Some parents are outraged, fearing it will rob their children of privacy.

The badges introduced at Brittan Elementary School on Jan. 18 rely on the same radio frequency and scanner technology that companies use to track livestock and product inventory.

While similar devices are being tested at several schools in Japan so parents can know when their children arrive and leave, Brittan appears to be the first U.S. school district to embrace such a monitoring system.

Civil libertarians hope to keep it that way.

ACLU seeks to snuff experiment in bud
“If this school doesn’t stand up (and oppose the use of the technology), then other schools might adopt it,” Nicole Ozer, a representative of the American Civil Liberties Union, warned school board members at a meeting Tuesday night. “You might be a small community, but you are one of the first communities to use this technology.”

The system was imposed, without parental input, by the school as a way to simplify attendance-taking and potentially reduce vandalism and improve student safety. Principal Earnie Graham hopes to eventually add bar codes to the existing ID’s so that students can use them to pay for cafeteria meals and check out library books.


But some parents see a system that can monitor their children’s movements on campus as something straight out of Orwell.

“There is a way to make kids safer without making them feel like a piece of inventory,” said Michael Cantrall, one of several angry parents who complained. “Are we trying to bring them up with respect and trust, or tell them that you can’t trust anyone, you are always going to be monitored and someone is always going to be watching you?”

Cantrall said he told his children, in the 5th and 7th grades, not to wear the badges. He also filed a protest letter with the board and alerted the ACLU.

Principal puzzled by reaction
Graham, who also serves as the superintendent of the single-school district, told the parents that their children could be disciplined for boycotting the badges — and that he doesn’t understand what all their angst is about.

“Sometimes when you are on the cutting edge, you get caught,” Graham said, recounting the angry phone calls and notes he has received from parents.

Each student is required to wear identification cards around their necks with their picture, name and grade and a wireless transmitter that beams their ID number to a teacher’s handheld computer when the child passes under an antenna posted above a classroom door.

Graham also asked to have a chip reader installed in locker room bathrooms to reduce vandalism, although that reader is not functional yet. And while he has ordered everyone on campus to wear the badges, he said only the 7th- and 8th-grade classrooms are being monitored thus far.


Misuse of information feared
In addition to the privacy concerns, parents are worried that the information from the badges could wind up in the wrong hands and endanger their children, and that radio frequency technology might carry health risks.

Graham dismisses each objection, arguing that the devices do not emit any cancer-causing radioactivity, and that for now, they merely confirm that each child is in his or her classroom, rather than track them around the school like a global-positioning device.


The 15-digit ID number that confirms attendance is encrypted, he said, and not linked to other personal information such as an address or telephone number.

What’s more, he says that it is within his power to set rules that promote a positive school environment: If he thinks ID badges will improve things, he says, then badges there will be.

“You know what it comes down to? I believe junior high students want to be stylish. This is not stylish,” he said.

Local firm promotes technology
This latest adaptation of radio frequency ID technology was developed by InCom Corp., a local company co-founded by the parent of a former Brittan student, and some parents are suspicious about the financial relationship between the school and the company. InCom plans to promote the technology at a national convention of school administrators next month.

InCom has paid the school several thousand dollars for agreeing to the experiment, and has promised a royalty from each sale if the system takes off, said the company’s co-founder, Michael Dobson, who works as a technology specialist in the town’s high school. Brittan’s technology aide also works part-time for InCom.

Not everyone in this close-knit farming town northwest of Sacramento is against the system. Some said they welcomed the IDs as a security measure.

“This is not Mayberry. This is Sutter, California. Bad things can happen here,” said Tim Crabtree, an area parent.

URL: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6946395/
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Junker

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When is RFID not RFID?
« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2005, 03:42:22 am »

It has become very profitable to distort the traditional correspondence between language and its intended meaning. As long as there is profit to be made, the distortion will continue and increase. It's been a long time since mainstream media, government publications, or law made much sense.

When is an RFID not an RFID? Well actually it never was. You see, it was a misnomer from the beginning. Calling an RFID an RFID is like calling a mirror a light bulb-- ridiculous on the face of it.
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sagas4

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When is RFID not RFID?
« Reply #6 on: March 31, 2005, 01:42:29 pm »

OK Junker,

I am at a loss on this one. Could you please explain your last post to me like I am a 6 year old? I got a case of the stupids today or Thunders Jedi powers have confused me. daaa . . . These aren't the droids i'm looking for. Move along.

A radio frequency is sent from a transmitter to a chip or card which has no power cell per se, but uses the transmited signal to power the circuit long enough to respond with a coded identifier. This numeric identifer really has no information other than the unique number itsself which is a database key, that can then be used to extract all information in the database keyed to that number.

Of course that describes a passive tag that has no internal power source,
An active tag has an internal power source and can store as well as send information.

What am I missing here?
« Last Edit: March 31, 2005, 01:46:39 pm by sagas4 »
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Junker

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When is RFID not RFID?
« Reply #7 on: March 31, 2005, 05:02:35 pm »

Very sorry, sagas4. Your understanding of RFID is fine. My second paragraph was an example of the first paragraph's "distortion of the correspondence between language and its meaning". Thus, if needed, they'll assert anything no matter whether it makes sense. So the example too makes little sense, but might be asserted as making sense by those trying to cover up the reality of RFID. Sorry to have wasted your brain cells on the matter.
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A Nonny Mouse

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When is RFID not RFID?
« Reply #8 on: April 01, 2005, 12:05:00 pm »

P&G is providing grants to colleges to teach about the benefits of RFID technology to business majors.
RFID Curriculum

Quote
Indiana University's Kelley School of Business won $150,000 from the P&G Fund to boost instruction of a new inventory-tracking technology for its graduate and undergraduate students.

The fund, an arm of Procter & Gamble Co. in Cincinnati, donated the money to boost knowledge of radio frequency identification, which attaches silicon chips with "smart tags" to various products so they can be tracked remotely.

Quote
IU also will use the grant to expand its RFID lab, which it built last spring. Eventually, IU officials said, lessons in RFID will be part of core classes for all Kelley undergraduates.

Great plan from the RFID-advocates point of view. Brainwash the future business leaders now, so they won't question things later.   :angry:



 
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sagas4

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When is RFID not RFID?
« Reply #9 on: April 06, 2005, 05:45:34 pm »

Quote
Great plan from the RFID-advocates point of view. Brainwash the future business leaders now, so they won't question things later.   :angry:
Or .....

It could be a psyops advertising campaign.

Give'em something now so they'll be more likely to buy *OUR* tags later.
It's an "immediate deductable investment with a huge potential return spread over many years".      
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Lightning

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When is RFID not RFID?
« Reply #10 on: April 06, 2005, 07:30:05 pm »

Quote
Are the majority of people brain dead or what?

How many of us worker bees are there compared to the relative population of the Royal Family in the Hive? Just say No. Are they going to arrest 300 million of us?
Yes, the majority are brain dead.

If they ever do wake up, you're right, sagas4 - they can't arrest or kill us all, and we can win.  Well said.

But first comes the hurdle of awareness that brings an understanding of the need for major change - the old "hundredth monkey" threshhold.  And who knows how long, or how much horror, it could take to reach that critical point.
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Roy J. Tellason

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When is RFID not RFID?
« Reply #11 on: April 06, 2005, 08:22:49 pm »

Quote
Quote
IU also will use the grant to expand its RFID lab, which it built last spring. Eventually, IU officials said, lessons in RFID will be part of core classes for all Kelley undergraduates.

Great plan from the RFID-advocates point of view. Brainwash the future business leaders now, so they won't question things later.   :angry:
Or,  great place for some folks to find out "what does it take to mess one of these things up?  "to burn it out?"  "to jam the reader?" and so forth.  A *LAB*?!  Sounds like a lot of fun to me!  :-)
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