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oldsarge

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« Reply #30 on: June 13, 2005, 02:18:55 pm »

outfoxed - I've been here awhile and still read and learn and change, constantly - gotta be flexible -oak tree vs willow.
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ultralongrunner

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« Reply #31 on: June 15, 2005, 12:31:09 am »

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I volunteer as an EMT for the local Ambulance service, and for some reason I never have a patient who can tell me there Social Security number or Race. (I have to fill out the form and put in "Patient could not remember" or "No SSN issued to Patient").  I told that to one of the other EMTs who asked why I never get that information, and now he never gets anyone with a SSN either. I do feel bad for lying to my shift captain "Yes, I did ask, but they did not know." but it's for the greater good.

 
Drill Sgt K:

Our EMS charting software now requires us to enter the SSN of the patient.  I've railed against it, but to no avail.  So, I've taken to typing in old lottery numbers instead. I've yet to get dinged for it, but am awaiting the day.  Like a 2 month old would know their own SSN.  

What surprises me is the number of people that, without question, tell me their SSN when I ask.  Of the thousands of patients I've had to ask, I've had one who told me no.  And I was happy with that.  I think that I wrote in my chart that "Patient chose to exercise their right and not disclose their SSN."  

HIPPA is another thing that hacks me off. I've gotten in trouble for the excuses that I've charted for not handing out the HIPPA, this is how we and the government and anyone else concerned will violate your privacy form. My favorites include, "Patient in cardiac arrest, would not sign form, tried three times." "Patient did not have name, did not know how to write, did not have SSN, would not cooperate." (This on a baby I had just delivered.).  And the best, "Patient in three pieces, could not find hand to have patient sign."

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« Last Edit: June 15, 2005, 12:31:44 am by ultralongrunner »
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Scarmiglione'

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« Reply #32 on: June 15, 2005, 07:34:55 am »

ulg, if I weren't so unbashedly macho I think I'd hug you.
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We've built a world safe for fools, and are overrun by them.

ultralongrunner

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« Reply #33 on: June 15, 2005, 08:40:15 am »

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ulg, if I weren't so unbashedly macho I think I'd hug you.
Thanks!

There are us moles out there.  Outstanding members of the community, very good employees, students, family people (all that I am) who are quietly contributing to the collapse of the system.  

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Snakebite

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« Reply #34 on: June 25, 2005, 08:31:31 pm »

I want to play devil's advocate a bit. I'm a new poster, but a long-time lurker, and am quite familiar with Claire's stuff going back well into the 90s. So please take my comments on this board as simply a testing of the waters, so to speak, or maybe tossing out a few softball (though honest) questions that I'm sure y'all will hit out of the park. You don't know me and I don't know you, so let's not assume otherwise and concentrate on the issues at hand. OK?

I just reread this page: http://www.clairewolfe.com/wolfesblog/00000600.html

And over the years have come across quite a few pages like this: http://ranprieur.com/essays/dropout.html

As well as many other pages and sites that, generally speaking, carry a similar theme, more or less. So with this in mind . . .

Q: What sort of philosophy advocates a way of life that seems plausible only by feeding off the crumbs that fall from the tables of those who despise or disdain that philosophy, or who are despised or disdained by those who espouse it?

Let me elaborate. Claire admitted she could not continue her public writing campaign if not for the financial support of the "moles" who live within, and are succored by, a system she herself has forsworn. And yet I'm assuming she's free to simply up and move somewhere else, where TPTB are either less intrusive, or simply don't care whether she lives or dies. Every year, millions of people who actually do live in such places clamor to gain entrance into this country. On the other hand, I'm unaware of a comparable exodus of drop-outs from this country to others.

And then there's Ran Prieur's essay. It appears this man despises the hand that feeds him. (Note, for example, his disdain for the fashionably dressed bike riders.) He dumpster dives to eat, rides a bike to travel, and wears second-hand clothes to keep warm. Fine. In fact, I admire his frugality. I've no problem with that lifestyle, in and of itself. And yet the scraps he eats were at some point manufactured by someone other than himself, as was his bike and the clothes he wears. I wonder if he's ever made a fire by hand, or flintknapped a projectile point, or scraped and braintanned a hide, or constructed a travois with which to haul his possessions. Because that's what he's looking at if he walks his talk. Meanwhile, he seems perfectly content living like a jackal, or a crow, eating leftovers off the bones of the carcass that only exists because the lions did all the hard work in the first place.

So straighten me out on all this stuff.  :)
« Last Edit: June 25, 2005, 08:33:14 pm by Snakebite »
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Roy J. Tellason

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« Reply #35 on: June 25, 2005, 11:10:17 pm »

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I just reread this page: http://www.clairewolfe.com/wolfesblog/00000600.html

And over the years have come across quite a few pages like this: http://ranprieur.com/essays/dropout.html

As well as many other pages and sites that, generally speaking, carry a similar theme, more or less.

Read 'em.  That guy writes an interesting essay,  and he gets some of it right,  but...

I've lived that life.  Been there,  done that,  and walked away from it.  It leads nowhere.  There's no permanency,  no way to aspire to anything in terms of personal accomplishment.  Among other things.

And he gets some of it flat-out wrong.

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So with this in mind . . .

Q: What sort of philosophy advocates a way of life that seems plausible only by feeding off the crumbs that fall from the tables of those who despise or disdain that philosophy, or who are despised or disdained by those who espouse it?

For some reason a little booklet that I haven't seen since the sixties comes to mind.  Reportedly written by Abbie Hoffman (whatever happened to him,  anyway?),  it was called "Fuck The System". It talked about how you could do a lot of stuff along those lines.  But of course,  things change.  The system changes,  the environment that you're in changes,  and you need to be able to keep up with those changes or you're screwed.  Anyhow this guy's attitude for some reason reminded me of that little booklet.

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Let me elaborate. Claire admitted she could not continue her public writing campaign if not for the financial support of the "moles" who live within, and are succored by, a system she herself has forsworn. And yet I'm assuming she's free to simply up and move somewhere else, where TPTB are either less intrusive, or simply don't care whether she lives or dies. Every year, millions of people who actually do live in such places clamor to gain entrance into this country. On the other hand, I'm unaware of a comparable exodus of drop-outs from this country to others.

I don't know about Claire or how she manages what she does.  I do know that I'm struggling with this issue to some extent myself -- there's a fair amount of stuff I want to be able to do,  not to mention ordinary day-to-day living expenses.  I've been unemployed for a bit over two years now.  Took the unemployment while it lasted,  that ran out,  had savings, they're gone,  and a while back I cashed in my IRA.  This has us current but with no reserve at all.  I'm at the point,  for a number of reasons,  one of them being me working my way into my second half-century,  that I'm no longer content to take the sort of shit-jobs I used to take,  to get by.  The particular skills I've spent more time on than anything else involve the repair of electronic equipment,  which has since become pretty much all throwaway,  at least as far as consumer stuff goes -- it may be that some other stuff still gets fixed.  Which leaves me with a fairly narrow range of choices.  I've done retail,  and it sucks.  I probably won't want to do it again if I have a choice,  though I can be good at it,  when it comes to working for somebody else.  I *may* do something working for myself,  perhaps,  but that's the sort of thing that takes a while to build up and you never know how well it's going to work out.  Or I can do clerical again,  which puts me into the whole BigCorp nonsense that I absolutely detest.  I'm NOT mentally suited to such environs,  and I know it,  and they know it too,  sometimes.

But something's gotta happen,  and fairly soon.  It should be fairly interesting to see what shakes out...

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And then there's Ran Prieur's essay. It appears this man despises the hand that feeds him. (Note, for example, his disdain for the fashionably dressed bike riders.) He dumpster dives to eat, rides a bike to travel, and wears second-hand clothes to keep warm. Fine. In fact, I admire his frugality. I've no problem with that lifestyle, in and of itself. And yet the scraps he eats were at some point manufactured by someone other than himself, as was his bike and the clothes he wears. I wonder if he's ever made a fire by hand, or flintknapped a projectile point, or scraped and braintanned a hide, or constructed a travois with which to haul his possessions. Because that's what he's looking at if he walks his talk. Meanwhile, he seems perfectly content living like a jackal, or a crow, eating leftovers off the bones of the carcass that only exists because the lions did all the hard work in the first place.

He's there,  in that lifestyle,  on his way to being somewhere else.  That's about the best I can say about it at this point in time.  Maybe after a while he'll come to realize what's behind some of this stuff,  maybe he'll still be in some city somewhere when TSHTF and cities become a place you really don't want to be,  and then he'll *really* have a learning experience.  I guess time will tell.

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So straighten me out on all this stuff.  :)

Heh.

I'll let you know what I find out.  It should be an interesting journey,  at the very least.
 
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Snakebite

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« Reply #36 on: June 26, 2005, 12:18:21 am »

RJ, honest response appreciated. Which is all I'm looking for.

I'm supposing that those who defend Claire will make a distinction between the system in which she lives and the government that keeps it "in check." As if they were two different animals. And they are, of course. But not quite. How many Republicans still suck on the government tit? In fact--check this out real closely--how many of y'all still suck on that tit, and are diggin it? And I'll tell you right now, if you voted for GW, you're as stupid a cog as ever a cog that cogged. And so instead you voted for a libertarian candidate who stands about as much chance of being elected president as Adolf Hitler stands being elected into the Rock n Roll Hall of Fame. Stalin maybe, someday, but never Adolf.

Ironic, isn't it, that Jews depended on gentiles in WWII for their survival, much as drop-outs today depend on drop-ins for theirs? But I haven't a particular axe to grind here, nor am I looking for a fight. Just Gimme Some Truth. All I Want Is the Truth.  :lol:

BTW, the Hoffman book you're thinking about might have been Steal This Book, which I did, in the sense that I read it a little at a time in the bookstore without ever buying it. Abbie ended his own life a few years back.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2005, 12:22:31 am by Snakebite »
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Claire

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« Reply #37 on: June 26, 2005, 05:58:53 pm »

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Q: What sort of philosophy advocates a way of life that seems plausible only by feeding off the crumbs that fall from the tables of those who despise or disdain that philosophy, or who are despised or disdained by those who espouse it?
 
Hi, Snakebite.

Well, I don't know what kind of philosophy that might be. It's nothing like the philosophy I hold. I don't despise prosperity or productivity. I don't despise prosperous, productive people. (And if some prosperous, productive people despise me or my life, there's nothing I can do about it).

If I could "live within the system" without having to cooperate with so many things that I do despise (e.g. the surveillance state; theft-by-government), then I'd live in glorious prosperity. In fact, coincidentally, I've just been drafting a possible future blog entry listing dozens of things I'd happily have or do if I were rich.

But having chosen as much non-cooperation as is possible for me at this stage of my life, I've discovered that the relatively simple life I forced on myself turns out to have a lot of pleasures. And ... I'm not feeding off of anybody's crumbs.

Can't speak for Mr. RP, but I've never made any claim to living a completely "pure" life. In fact, I've often said such a life is impossible in this day and age. As he says, in a different context, everyone has his own path. I believe Moles benefit Ghosts benefit Agitators benefit Moles, etc. I believe in trade and mutual support networks, etc. in which every participant might play very different roles.

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Let me elaborate. Claire admitted she could not continue her public writing campaign if not for the financial support of the "moles" who live within, and are succored by, a system she herself has forsworn. And yet I'm assuming she's free to simply up and move somewhere else, where TPTB are either less intrusive, or simply don't care whether she lives or dies.

Uh ... tell me where that place might be and I'll consider it.

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Every year, millions of people who actually do live in such places clamor to gain entrance into this country. On the other hand, I'm unaware of a comparable exodus of drop-outs from this country to others.

I'd venture a guess that most of the millions who come here don't care a fig about freedom. They care about making more money -- and who can blame them? But there's definitely also an exodus from this country. It just looks different. It's not millions of the poor, hungry, and desperate fleeing; it's tens of thousands of the prosperous, educated, and aware. They're exiting to the Caribbean, Central America, New Zealand, etc.

And TPTB ought to be at least as alarmed by the entrepreneurs and opinion leaders rushing out as they are by masses rushing in.

I'm not joining the exodus (yet) for a variety of reasons -- but the number one reason is that I've looked into emigration repeatedly and I haven't found another country I could go to that is significantly more free than the U.S. in the areas that most matter to me (especially gun rights).

The U.S. is on the road to hell and IMHO rushes further from freedom with every decision from what Silver so pointedly called the Nazgul (on today's blog) and every law that comes out of Congress. But that doesn't necessarily mean any other country is astonishingly much more free. Nor does that mean I hate this country or the people who live in it. This is my home and I love it.

Claire
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ZooT_aLLures

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« Reply #38 on: June 26, 2005, 06:30:55 pm »

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This is my home and I love it.


That's something that I've always thought.......this is my home.......if some monster wants to create a socialist hell, let him go somewhere else and do it........

By the same token that's also something government folks should think about......there's an awful lot of people willing to die to protect their homes and/or lives.....are government folks willing to die to take them?

 
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Even some cowboy and indian outlaws in the 1800's eventually stopped sleeping under buffalo skins, and came to town to entertain paying customers. For some I imagine the bruising of their ego never healed.

We all have some scar tissue that never lets us completely forget the intent of the adventure.

Snakebite

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« Reply #39 on: June 26, 2005, 10:12:54 pm »

Well, the picture I painted was off base, of course, better suited to Ran Prieur's end of the spectrum than Claire's. And I understand that neither she nor anyone here advocates the socialist class crap you get from the Looney Left. It's not the system per se, but rather the "management company" that's out of control. As I said, I was playing devil's advocate, just trying to stir up a bit of conversation relating to, essentially, I guess, what it's like to exist in two different modes, and whatever philosophical observations might result from that.

As for my real take on stuff, I think things have progressed, or devolved, far enough that we've already passed the point of no return. Case law has rendered the Constitution unrecognizable (and thus meaningless), and most sheeple today apparently have little or no concept of the difference between, say, "natural" and "political" rights. (Health care is a right, isn't it? You bet it is, every bit as much as school lunches.)

I suppose one reaction might be to simply prepare as well as possible for the Unraveling, then start over. Another might be to try to forstall it. And another might be to facilitate it. Of course, there's also the probability that things won't really unravel at all, at least not as quickly as some would prefer. In the end we have the Indian on his horse, straddling the railroad tracks, bow drawn, war paint in place, thinking he's going to stop the smoking monster bearing down on him at 80 mph. Fast forward 150 years, and we have the Casino Americans living on their reservations. But at least they're still around.
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Roy J. Tellason

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« Reply #40 on: June 26, 2005, 11:44:06 pm »

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BTW, the Hoffman book you're thinking about might have been Steal This Book, which I did, in the sense that I read it a little at a time in the bookstore without ever buying it. Abbie ended his own life a few years back.
Nope,  that came along later...

I don't remember just exactly when that was published,  but it was at least a couple or three years after the one I'm thinking of.
 
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Roy J. Tellason

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« Reply #41 on: June 26, 2005, 11:50:01 pm »

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I'm not joining the exodus (yet) for a variety of reasons -- but the number one reason is that I've looked into emigration repeatedly and I haven't found another country I could go to that is significantly more free than the U.S. in the areas that most matter to me (especially gun rights).

That pretty well says it for me.

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The U.S. is on the road to hell and IMHO rushes further from freedom with every decision from what Silver so pointedly called the Nazgul (on today's blog) and every law that comes out of Congress. But that doesn't necessarily mean any other country is astonishingly much more free.

Yeah.  Any time the thought even enters my head the first question that comes to mind is,  "Where is it that's going to be better than here?  And how can I be sure of that?"  It's a hell of a move to make.  And things will have to get a LOT worse before I'll even consider it seriously.

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Nor does that mean I hate this country or the people who live in it. This is my home and I love it.

Yep.  I just have a problem with those folks that supposedly "run" it...
 
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Member of the toughest, meanest, deadliest, most unrelenting -- and ablest -- form of life in this section of space,  a critter that can be killed but can't be tamed.  --Robert A. Heinlein, "The Puppet Masters"
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Information is more dangerous than cannon to a society ruled by lies. --James M Dakin

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« Reply #42 on: July 09, 2005, 04:35:48 pm »

Something for Moles to do now.

Make a choice to be a mole. What I mean is to decide to be a mole in the system. Especially if your in shoes like mine.  I'm in the army, have been for a long time, but the nation I joined to defend is not the nation I am serving today. It's not time to STB yet, but I can see it coming.  

I'm carefully talking to my fellow soldiers, feeling them out on where they stand on what is going on. I have successfully given out copies of the Constitution; loaned "The State vs The People" and "Dumbing Us Down" to several soldiers over the last two  years. I've given copies of "101 ( and more) things to do till the revolution" and "Developing a low cost family food storage" to the more receptive few.  I have kept my ear's and eyes open for opportunities to inject a little truth or thought into my "co-workers" at any opportunity.

It's hard not to want to just jump up and down and yell "Cant you see what's going on!" Now that the Local Bus system is randomly asking for ID to ride, and the new rules say that any bags brought on the MTA buses and trains are subject to search at any time, You just feel that strong urge to scream when everyone just goes along with it. (and Worse is when I find myself going along with it.)

Another way to decide to be a mole is to become an expert in the system your in. I have an acquaintance who works for the EPA's research department and her husband works for National Public Health's Bio-Hazard Response department.  She has limited dealings with the rest of the EPA, but has learned who is the real powers behind the screens, keeps an ear out for gossip, copies any non-classifyed email/memos, is learning exactly how different departments work and what they really do.  This is not because she is a mole, but because she is naturally noise. But a real mole who did the same thing could be an invaluable tool for any any resistance. Her husband is just smart and knows a lot about Bio-Hazards and how the Government might respond to one. These are people I take an extra effort to stay in contact with. (It helps that they are generally nice, all though she is a bit nosie.)

Just think what one could do. Hand over a list of who is sleeping with who among the power brokers, just what forms to file in which department to stop or delay some action by the government machine. (example: the City wants to take your homestead and turn it into a parking lot for S-Mart, But suddenly the EPA slaps an injunction on it due to the possibility of the rare Great Speckled Bird likes to poop on the grass. While that grinds through the courts you buy time to keep up the fight or move or throw the bum's out of office and change the towns mind.)

I'm going to think of other ways for a mole to be a mole in the system, as I think of some I'll post more. I would love to see comments on the best way to be a mole or just how nuts my ideas are. I plan on trying some of them too.

Drill Sgt K
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Shevek

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« Reply #43 on: July 09, 2005, 05:51:40 pm »

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What surprises me is the number of people that, without question, tell me their SSN when I ask.
Your observation does not surprise me. Simply look at the way in which you phrased the comment: their SSN. Your own observation contains a degree of slave-speak. To overcome this nasty habit, simply start eliminating qualifying words such as their or my. Once people begin to appreciate the difference, the cloud begins to clear and people begin to act less like slaves. Liberty is a mental attitude and our language reflects that attitude.

And hats off to those of you who refuse to ask or record these numbers.

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Meanwhile, he seems perfectly content living like a jackal, or a crow, eating leftovers off the bones of the carcass that only exists because the lions did all the hard work in the first place.
From a purely biological perspective, his lifestyle is acceptable. Many animals survive by scrounging and scavenging. Granted, animals have yet to reveal to us humans an ability to articulate concepts and feel contempt, but biologically his choice is valid. He is merely surviving.

I can't speak for Claire, nor will I try, but independently I have chosen a similar lifestyle as hers. I live frugally, not as a pauper but within my means. I do not go into debt to satisfy any urges of instant gratification. I live at the edges of the radar screen, but I have yet to meet anybody, including myself, who has or can completely escape the processes around us. I simply pursue a path that, to me, provides me minimal exposure to things I do not like.

The best any of us can do is discover our own definition of happiness. Once defined we then can plan our future. I totally enjoy many of the tools and equipment available today that allows me to produce more efficiently, but I am not materialistic about having everything. There are only 24 hours each day and with each passing day I come closer to my last breath. Time is a scarce resource. I must choose and prioritize my needs and wants and learn to distinguish between needs and wants. I have merely chosen to live within my means and pursue my definition of happiness. My definition is not the same as anybody else's although there are common threads. I depend somewhat on moles, but if a mole is impossible, and I decide that a decision requires me to move too far beyond my definition of happiness, then I live without. The bottom line is that living outside the "system," in any degree, requires sacrifice. There is no other option. The trick is to decide what sacrifices you'll accept and why.

Conflict arises because there are many people who believe they have standing to decide for me what my definition of happiness should be. And therein lies part of the problem revealed in discussions such as this. Voltaire wrote in Candide that we each should tend our garden. Sound advice. Unfortunately, there are fundamental flaws in our global exchange system, flaws that tempt people to be more concerned with the gardens of other people more than their own. Flaws that easily could be corrected if enough people wanted and were properly educated. With those flaws corrected much of this discussion would be irrelevant because then there would be no "system" to fight. Eliminating those destructive flaws would allow each of us to tend our own gardens.

I can only say about my life is that I have chosen to go far out of my way to abide by fundamental anarchist principles. I refuse to knowingly trespass the boundaries of other people. I try hard to tend to my own garden.

I've looked into migrating to another part of the globe, but frankly, my location is rather ideal despite the statist shenanigans. I long ago learned that "there" is not better than "here" because once you move to "there" all you have done is change the location of "here." And people are primarily the same "there" as they are "here." I live rurally, in a location not easily affected by urbanism or that mindset. If the SHTF, I'd struggle to survive just as anybody else, but I would be less affected. Geographically, I don't worry about hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, tsunamis, or miserable heat. I'm surrounded by peaceful woods. Life sucks not having broadband, but I would not trade all the other advantages just to have that one wish. I'm located in an area that is just as statist as elsewhere, but my rural location reduces and minimizes the effects. I pretty much live the way I want to. I still pay the annual bribe known as property taxes, something I despise more than income taxes, and I also carry a permission slip to travel the king's roads. But overall, the impact is so nominal that I can't see moving. I prefer a quiet and peaceable life over urban living. That's what makes me tick. My life is not for everybody, although I suspect my short description might interest a few people.

I've spent years studying social systems, philosophy, etc., and I'm convinced things will continue to worsen long before they ripen. I ain't no savior, and humans will have to plod their way through the next few chapters. I grieve because I believe things could be much better, but I can't stop the inertia. I have grown to conclude that either a cataclysmic collapse is necessary to promote meaningful change---but then a dictator might rise from the ashes, or we simply have to wait for everything to fade and change through atrophy and apathy. History reveals that whatever happens will happen in a period of decades and centuries, not months or years. Interesting events happen such as the collapse of the Berlin wall, but those people merely traded one version of statism for another. True reform did not happen. Thus, I've concluded that I had better enjoy what remains of the time I have left. Unless there are remarkable medical and scientific breakthroughs in the next few years that can extend my expected life span beyond three score and ten, then I have to accept that I'm at a stage in life where the final countdown has begun. Even if such technology came to be, I'm unsure I want to continue in this kind of world.

The death of my best friend caused me to do a lot of reflecting. One moment we are here and the next we're not. We are born and then we die. What happens in between? With respect to a universe that is allegedly 12 billion years old, the obvious answer is "not much." But that answer is absurd because humans have no ability to act as outside observers with this universe. The only perspective we know is "me." Thus, what happens in between is "everything."

Yet, as John Maynard Keynes once quipped, "In the long run we're all dead." To add to that thought, I'll add a line attributed to the ancient Hebrew Joshua and say, "Choose you this day whom you will serve." I can't decide for you what your definition of happiness might be. I can only decide for myself.

Define your happiness. Then the rest tends to fall in place. I've grown to believe that the ultimate question is not what is "right" or "wrong," but what choices tend to bring you happiness. If your definition of happiness brings you less conflict in life, then you have discovered what is "right" and "wrong" for you. Doesn't matter if you are an escape artist or a mole.

My hat is off to you too DrillSgtK. You've chosen your path. You've decided what happens in between.
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"But there was always time for swimming and for talking, and never a time by which a task must be finished. There were no hours: only whole days, whole nights." The Children of the Open Sea, The Farthest Shore, Ursula K. Le Guin.

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Malaclypse

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Re: Moles
« Reply #44 on: September 23, 2005, 01:10:27 pm »


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The death of my best friend caused me to do a lot of reflecting. One moment we are here and the next we're not. We are born and then we die. What happens in between? With respect to a universe that is allegedly 12 billion years old, the obvious answer is "not much." But that answer is absurd because humans have no ability to act as outside observers with this universe. The only perspective we know is "me." Thus, what happens in between is "everything."

I came late to this thread but just couldn't let this go without comment:

First, Shevek, let me extend my condolences on the death of your friend.  Whether the loss is near or far makes no difference, it is a loss nonetheless.

Second, this is one of the most succinct and pithy comments I have read on the state of human beings.  You bring the vastness of existence to a single bright point and put all the responsibility on the individual, where it belongs.  At the end of the day, no one can make you happy or sad or angry or giddy.  The choice is yours and yours alone.  Make it the right one, for you.

Thanks for making an otherwise ordinary day very thoughtful.

Malaclypse

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\"Look, if I went round saying I was Emperor just because some moistened bint had lobbed a scimitar at me, they'd put me away!\"
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